What should I expect to pay for... - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 51 of 51
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Damascus, MD
    Posts
    1,485
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4288
    Likes (Received)
    849

    Default

    I'm really glad about the happy end: you got your thing fixed, learning a few things in the process and acquiring new tools that will help you getting a few other problems solved.

    Be careful: you've been infected with an incurable bug and you'll soon crave for more and better tools to solve even more problems yourself.

    Paolo

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    2,591
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    347
    Likes (Received)
    719

    Default

    Those are cast iron v blocks you have your shaft on- not a good idea to put huge loads on them as you just might get a sudden surprise
    when one lets go. Better to just check the shaft on v blocks and push on it with the shaft sitting on some steel blocks. glad you got er done though!!

  3. Likes HardRooster liked this post
  4. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    30
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    18
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan from Oakland View Post
    Those are cast iron v blocks you have your shaft on- not a good idea to put huge loads on them as you just might get a sudden surprise
    when one lets go. Better to just check the shaft on v blocks and push on it with the shaft sitting on some steel blocks. glad you got er done though!!
    Good to know, what should I consider a huge load, for future reference?

    (I'll add that it took surprisingly little effort to bend the shaft straight. Much more effort, and I mean MUCH more effort went into pressing that pulley off and on.)

  5. #44
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Interior British Columbia
    Posts
    2,403
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    247
    Likes (Received)
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan from Oakland View Post
    Those are cast iron v blocks you have your shaft on- not a good idea to put huge loads on them as you just might get a sudden surprise
    when one lets go. Better to just check the shaft on v blocks and push on it with the shaft sitting on some steel blocks. glad you got er done though!!
    Yep. there was a pretty good collection of broken parts of those style vee blocks, under and around the press in the shop I used to work in. Sorta OK if used along the solid section of the edge, but not so much when the force is spreading the vee.

    You know there was too much pressure, by the sound of your part rattling around on the floor at your feet, along with the pieces of the vee block...

    We had some solid off-cuts of aluminum with a couple grooves in them to keep the stuff from rolling around. If marring the work was a possibility, a bit of sheet aluminum between the end of the press ram and the part.

    Cheers
    Trev

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    N.W. Ark.
    Posts
    411
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    241
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    [QUOTE=HardRooster;2979218]Good to know, what should I consider a huge load, for future reference?

    (I'll add that it took surprisingly little effort to bend the shaft straight.

    lets hope that it doesn't take surprisingly little effort to re bend it ,keep us informed..

  7. #46
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    375
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    403
    Likes (Received)
    189

    Default

    Same issue with a bent jackshaft but in my case leading to complete failure. Jackshaft is in two pieces. User error- I lifted the chipper beyond the capacity of the pto shaft.

    I’m disassembling to weld it back together and Re-machine the shaft.

    Any idea how to remove the taper lock pulley assembly? There are no threaded removal holes.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    37

    Default

    HardRooster, nice job...

  9. Likes Greg White liked this post
  10. #48
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    375
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    403
    Likes (Received)
    189

    Default

    For those who may come later and wonder...I drilled and tapped two 1/2" 13 tpi holes 180 degrees apart in the flange portion of the taper hub. This allowed me to screw in two 1/2" bolts to use to force the taper lock apart. A little bit of heat with a propane torch (no more than 30 seconds directed at the outer hub) and a torqueing the jack screws separated the hub.

    I honestly don't think this taper lock would easily come apart without the screws. Not sure why they weren't originally manufactured into the hub.

    But success.

    Next step- Weld prep the two stubs of the shaft with vees on the lathe followed by TIG root and 7018 stick build-up to join the broken pieces.

    Advice welcome.

  11. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    37

    Default

    Had you unscrewed the taper-lok screws about a turn and tapped with a hammer and drift would/could it have separated the tapers?

    How were you going to align the two pieces prior to weld? Were you going to drill/bore a hole in each piece and align with a small pin, indicate it straight, tack, get it straight again weld a little more check straightness... TIG it up.

    I thought so...

  12. #50
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    375
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    403
    Likes (Received)
    189

    Default

    Anthony-

    Thanks for your questions.

    Unfortunately, tapping on the loosened taper lock didn't do it. Beat on it with a lead hammer and it didn't budge. Jack screws and heat made it easy.

    The two pieces had different diameters, so I turned a delrin bushing to a press-fit on the smaller portion of the shaft and an OD equal to the larger portion. That way the two pieces would register concentric in a long vee block. TIG welded the root to hold that alignment then followed with 7018 cover passes.

    Worked great, although as it stands right now there's a 0.055 bend in the shaft I'll need to get out. Basically I've arrived back at the same situation facing the OP. Will start with some flame straightening but it's mild steel and isn't shrinking back as much as I'd like. Will try refining my technique but then switch to hydraulic press or some other mechanical straightening solution if that doesn't work.

  13. #51
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    375
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    403
    Likes (Received)
    189

    Default

    First attempt at mechanical straightening coupled with flame straightening took about .015 of the bend out. Slow going and multiple applications were required. Eventually I think I'll get there...but slow.

    TO the OP (or others with this same problem)- just got off the phone with Woodmaxx. They do stock a replacement jackshaft for the reasonable price of $66 shipped. I'll be ordering that replacement and keeping my repaired shaft as a back-up.

  14. Likes Paolo_MD liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •