WTB lathe conpound for use on mill table.
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    Default WTB lathe conpound for use on mill table.

    Lathe compound wanted, , something that would fit OK on a mill with a 9" wide table. Perhaps 12" to 16" in length. I want to use it to hold various tools, grinders etc.
    If in the Seattle-Bremerton area I could pick it up.
    Thanks, stoneaxe.

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    Nobody has a compound pulled off an old lathe? I figured these would be stacked deep and wide!

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    Quote Originally Posted by stoneaxe View Post
    Nobody has a compound pulled off an old lathe? I figured these would be stacked deep and wide!
    Have to catch them right close to part-out or scrap. Folks buy them up when they have a missing or damaged one.

    I'd just BORROW one of one of my own lathes, actually.
    Last edited by thermite; 11-22-2019 at 10:38 AM.

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    I have the cross slide and compound off of a south bend 9. PM me if interested.

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    My only lathe (is this a sin?) is a 1340 Taiwan and the compound looks a bit wimpy for the mill.
    The SB 9 may be a bit small also. Any scrapyards around the Puget sound that have old machinery, where one can poke around?

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    I need a compound for a 16" Leblond HD if anybody has one. Thanks. Rick 501-519-7425

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    Quote Originally Posted by stoneaxe View Post
    My only lathe (is this a sin?) is a 1340 Taiwan and the compound looks a bit wimpy for the mill.
    No, it ain't.

    It could manage a cutting-tool if you were truing that spindle ON that lathe.

    You sure as God made little green apples ain't going at anything CLOSE to "hogging".
    Just the merest skosh of clean-up.

    A grinder puts even less stress onto its mount.

    Providing YOU don't get overly careless and crash the silly bugger, of course.


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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by stoneaxe View Post
    Lathe compound wanted, , something that would fit OK on a mill with a 9" wide table. Perhaps 12" to 16" in length. I want to use it to hold various tools, grinders etc.
    If in the Seattle-Bremerton area I could pick it up.
    Thanks, stoneaxe.
    How much travel do you need ?

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    I don't know- maybe 3" ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stoneaxe View Post
    I don't know- maybe 3" ?
    I have the one in the picture...2 3/4” travel
    $90 plus $15 shipping
    Ted
    [email protected]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 284489b8-b21a-4bea-9fd9-d3329b6052e2.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by SBLatheman View Post
    I have the one in the picture...2 3/4” travel
    $90 plus $15 shipping
    Ted
    [email protected]
    Ah.. Ted? It would be $180 for TWO to cover the 3", then?



    One might suspect seeking bigger is as much for stout and stable as it is for travel?

    Not mentioned but last time I looked, SB had a disk with a dovetailed edge under their compound, retention by the tips of affixing/locking screws coming in from the sides?

    If so, those would need a mating socket to be amenable to attach, hold-onto, and adjust on the mill.

    Some larger lathes, compound is flat-bottomed, rotates about a pin, bolts down vertically through a flat skirt, bolt heads up-top, each side of the slide in easy reach.

    Could be waaay less hassle to set that type up onto a riser for the mill?

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Ah.. Ted? It would be $180 for TWO to cover the 3", then?



    One might suspect seeking bigger is as much for stout and stable as it is for travel?

    Not mentioned but last time I looked, SB had a disk with a dovetailed edge under their compound, retention by the tips of affixing/locking screws coming in from the sides?

    If so, those would need a mating socket to be amenable to attach, hold-onto, and adjust on the mill.

    Some larger lathes, compound is flat-bottomed, rotates about a pin, bolts down vertically through a flat skirt, bolt heads up-top, each side of the slide in easy reach.

    Could be waaay less hassle to set that type up onto a riser for the mill?
    Bill,
    The compound in the picture is not a South Bend. This one has two screws to attach it to the cross slide and just a pin in the center for the pivot, I don’t know the brand. The cross slide is in the picture too, and is included.
    FYI: not all South Bends have the dovetailed pilot you describe.
    Ted

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    I once had an old L&S lathe that had the compound removed. I sold it long ago but continued to watch for a suitable compound for it if only to help the new owner. In about 50 years I only recently stumbled onto a used one from a smaller import machine, and that happened to be on Craigslist, from a fellow that only had that one piece of that oddball lathe in his home shop. That doesn't make me think that they are easy to find out your way either.

    I suggest looking on ebay for 'dovetail slide' or 'linear slide'. There are lots of devices that fit that description that you could use for grinding that spindle, including the cutoff slide for a Hardinge lathe.. I have a lever operated slide made by Kurt that I use for grinding my own spindles with a toolpost grinder, one of those would be perfect, but they are really scarce used and no longer sold new AFAICT. Lever operated would be my choice over handwheel operated because the lever would eliminate the side to side force of turning the wheel by hand that makes a compound wiggle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SBLatheman View Post
    Bill,
    The compound in the picture is not a South Bend. This one has two screws to attach it to the cross slide and just a pin in the center for the pivot, I don’t know the brand. The cross slide is in the picture too, and is included.
    FYI: not all South Bends have the dovetailed pilot you describe.
    Ted
    OK, but I still class it a bit small, short, and light.

    The swivel, cross. and long-axis table off a Browne & Sharpe Universal mill I have is a tad over the top, buuuut.

    The one-tee-slot 13 inch table off a Burke # 4 or similar small mill might be easier to find than a truant cross-slide? Less-costly than anything "Hardinge" at all, too.

    Easier to use as well?



    Hopefully a middle ground shows up!

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    I have a Hardinge DSB available, need to dig it out of storage. Might be overkill for what you're doing.

    QB

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    Photo of the Kurt slide

    111.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    Photo of the Kurt slide

    111.jpg
    Well I just learned how to use a sine bar to set a taper grind angle!

    That is if the test bar is running concentric- but if it is, why is the spindle being ground? Or has the test bar been manipulated, shimmed, etc to run true for the sole purpose of establishing a angle?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stoneaxe View Post
    Well I just learned how to use a sine bar to set a taper grind angle!

    That is if the test bar is running concentric- but if it is, why is the spindle being ground? Or has the test bar been manipulated, shimmed, etc to run true for the sole purpose of establishing a angle?
    well, that is a whole different subject! (how to set the spindle up for regrinding the taper)maybe its been covered?

    back to the topic, perhaps for both availability and travel length, you might want to look for a different "doner animal", such as a cheap tabletop mill or an engraving table such as a "pear" brand, more robust, longer travel, more available. also, I think most lathe compounds are pretty trashed by the time the iron gets parted out, so most of what you will find IS junk.

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    I've got a few of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stoneaxe View Post
    Well I just learned how to use a sine bar to set a taper grind angle!

    That is if the test bar is running concentric- but if it is, why is the spindle being ground? Or has the test bar been manipulated, shimmed, etc to run true for the sole purpose of establishing a angle?

    We stoned the high spots out of the taper until the test bar ran true. We were grinding the horizontal spindle because it was dicked up from careless tool handling (big machine, hard to reach, sharp corners on the pull studs) and did the vertical spindle 'while we're at it". If the face of your spindle runs true you can work from there to get the angle, you can grind the face first if you need to.

    Edit - If all else fails, you could put a bar in the spindle and grind it true in 2 places like a lathe test bar and use that to set your angle from.


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