200 Volt - 3 Phase Motors - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Very helpful post. Thank you,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jraef View Post
    There are two "Classes" of voltages un the US: Distribution Voltage and Utilization Voltage. Distribution is what the utilities deliver: 480, 240, 208 etc. utilization is what the equipment, i.e. motor, manufacturers design to, which allows for a certain amount of expected voltage drop between the distribution connection and the motor termination. The Utilization Voltage is always lower. So for 480V, it is 460V, for 240V it is 230V, and for 208V it is 200V. That's what you have.

    Because of the volume of 208V 3 phase distribution systems in commercial installations, many motor mfrs sell a motor rated for anywhere from 200-240V. It's really a compromise, but they don't say that. you would get better motor life on a 208V system using a motor nameplated at 200V.

    PS, as others have said, there is nothing about the voltage rating that would make it not work on a 240V 3 phase system (although it would run hot and not last long). So if it failed to start, it was something else.

  2. #22
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    I just experienced my first 200 volt three phase motor. In a 70's Rockwell HD shaper. It's a two horse motor that says on the nameplate it was built by Baldor. I called Delta technical help about this and he told me Baldor still makes 200 volt motors. Rockwell had them available for special order. They were used in places, especially rural areas, that could not get full 230 volt power at that distance. He said it could be run anywhere between 180 and 220 volts. Main thing was that it did not draw any more amps than the motor faceplate shows. My three phase measures 226 volts so no go for me. Tom

  3. #23
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    Just to reiterate, it has nothing to do with "rural areas". 200V is the OFFICIAL utilization voltage rating for a motor designed to function on a 208V 3 phase system, VERY COMMON in the US for light industrial and commercial 3 phase installations.

    The fact that a LOT of people just go ahead and use a 230V rated motor on a 208V supply is just the real world meeting the official world. Distributors don't like to stock motors that can only be sold in one specific area. So many of the motor mfrs released motors with nameplates that say something like "208/230V" and provide two values of FLA, one for 208V, one for 230V. What those are however is a compromise design, basically a 220V winding that is designed to allow for a wider voltage tolerance.

    The standard NEMA design spec is +-10%, so a motor designed for 230V is good for 207 to 253V without appreciable loss of performance or life. However, Utility standards allow for a +-5% voltage tolerance, and then that is just to the Service Entrance. By the time the voltage gets through all the wires to the motor, it often drops another 5% or more. So on a 208V service from the utility, they are allowed to deliver you 197.6V, then by the time that gets out to the motor, it might be 187V. So for a true 230V motor design, you are another 10% below the allowable 10% of it's range and the motor will fry. On the "dual rated" motors, they use a 220V winding basis, then use a little more iron to allow a wider acceptable range of +-15%, making it good for 187 to 253V. But that costs more, so OEMs, who have to watch every penny, buy the 200V motors when they know the end user has 208V.

    What you do with it after it get there is your own business.

    But as the others have said, if it didn't work on your RPC, it's because there is something else wrong with it, not because it is a 200V design. It should have started and run, but would have run hot.

  4. #24
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    So if I have 3ph 230v power, I can run a Japanese 3ph 200v with no issues?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sky View Post
    So if I have 3ph 230v power, I can run a Japanese 3ph 200v with no issues?
    200v 50hz motors work just fine on 230v 60hz.

    if you have a 200v 60hz motor then you will need to monitor the motor's temperature if you intend to just plug it in and see if you can get away with it.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by johansen View Post
    200v 50hz motors work just fine on 230v 60hz.

    if you have a 200v 60hz motor then you will need to monitor the motor's temperature if you intend to just plug it in and see if you can get away with it.

    Would a 200v, 60hz, 3 phase motor work as an idler motor on a phase converter?

  7. #27
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    In a place I worked we had quite a few of those motors, 200VAC single voltage motors. What I didn't see was the complete wiring diagram in the photo. The motors we had were fan motors on heating units using hot water. A good many didn't run. Pulling the motor they had a thermal switch that I found to be bad, bypassing the switch the motor operated. Some of the motors were bad, windings were cooked. I can't remember how the thermal switch was wired. Local motor supplier was able to get replacements for the bad ones and supply thermal switches for those that needed them. If I recall correctly the switch shorted the commons together on a Wye connection.

  8. #28
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    I'd bought a used motor and a used VFD and hooked up and couldn't get it to run. ...my first VFD attempt ever

    The motor is a baldor which spins fine by hand is clean and appears fine. Ohm meter testing shows 2 Ohms between any 2 leads(expected more resistance but I don't know much about this stuff). It's a 3 lead motor with no wiring diagram on the plate. This motor is 200v as well.

    I bought a brand new VFD to eliminate the possibility of a bad used VFD -but before I hook it up I wanted to get some advice so I don't ruin the vfd.

    Here's a pic of the motor plate

    And the new vfd is good for 2hp single phase in 220v 7AMP

    20190409_165339.jpg

    Is there any traps awaiting me in this connection or is it pretty simple set up? There's only 3 wires coming out of the motor access box.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dizzolve View Post
    I'd bought a used motor and a used VFD and hooked up and couldn't get it to run. ...my first VFD attempt ever


    Is there any traps awaiting me in this connection or is it pretty simple set up?
    program the vfd for 200v/60hz. as for why it didn't work i don't know.

  10. #30
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    Just a word on forum etiquette: tagging onto a 5 year old thread is a great way to get ignored... You should start a new thread with a new issue, reference the old thread if you see relevance.

    If the VFD + motor combination didn't work, chances are about 90% that its an issue in the VFD, not the motor. An old used VFD that has sat un-powered for years will potentially become a boat anchor as soon as you power it up if you do not perform what's called a "capacitor reforming procedure". That's what I would suspect first off.

    If the VFD was only recently (as in less than a year) taken out of service and it doesn't work, it might be due to erroneous programming. I always suggest that with any used VFD, you always start off first with a "Reset to factory defaults" before doing anything else, that way you get rid of any weird programming that the previous user was doing.

  11. Likes TDegenhart, dizzolve liked this post

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