Best way to clean electric motor windings - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,010
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8686

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    twenty bucks says the local Ace Hardware store won't sell you a gallon of trichlor.

    Fair odds are that neither will anyone else!

    Sez he supposedly among those a 'dyin of MASSIVEe over-exposure to it.. and maybe I am?

    Recruiting Sergeant may have lied about joining the Army meaning you'd get to live forever?

    Sgt Major Chesnaky, 52d Artillery Bde, over-limit on years in-service off the back of a waiver signed by Maxwell Taylor hisself said it weren't so.

    It would only SEEM like it!


  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Temecula, Ca
    Posts
    2,960
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1312
    Likes (Received)
    3805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    twenty bucks says the local Ace Hardware store won't sell you a gallon of trichlor.

    actually, a couple years ago I was in an old mom and pop hardware store looking for some trichloroethane, when way in the back, covered in a few decades worth of dust was a pint can of trichloroethylene. I bought it and since used it on something or other, but in California it's probably a capital offense to have now.

  3. Likes Yan Wo liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    42
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    A particular "Best Way" is determined by the nature of the job and what one has to work with.

    Motors having excessive amounts of grease on the windings are washed using soap and water.
    It's typically accomplished in a cleaning booth devoted for the job.

    Before using a pressure washer, the bulk of the debris is physically removed.
    Care must be given to not literally BLAST the winding to a point of degrading the electrical insulation.
    In that respect, there is an element of knowledge and skill required.

    Shops having parts washing machines have the option of getting stators washed while
    working on other portions of the repair process.

    Ultra sonic cleaning is used on problematic repairs that require that approach.
    Another method used on heavily covered, difficult to remove winding debris is
    a process where the stator is submerged in a vat, tub, or barrel of water and a cleaning solution.
    With the motor completely submerged in the container, a controlled air line is run into the water
    to agitate the cleaning solution. From time-to-time, the air line is repositioned in different
    locations to reach all portions of the dirty item.

    Large pieces of equipment are sometimes cleaned with a process called "ice blasting".

    Obviously after all the washing, the item must be completely dried out.
    This is accomplished by placing the stator in a controlled temperature oven.
    Drying time can vary and is often determined by the size of the item.

    People working on stuff like this on their own can creatively come up with other
    cleaning methods... including taking the thing to a car wash spray booth.
    (Not suggesting to do it that way, I'm just mentioning it... because it does happen.)

    If you don't have an oven, you can position heat lamps or even light bulbs
    near the stator, and cover the set-up with some form of canopy enclosing the heat.

    After the stator has been proven to be "dry" and electrically "okay", it is either re-varnished
    or at least spray insulated using an aerosol can paint product.

    John

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    758
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    99

    Default

    It is a done deal guys.

    Light scrubbing with Simple Green and a soft chip brush.
    Hosed out with a 40 psi garden hose, did want to risk damage using my pressure washer.
    Parked by warm heat of my biomass, oxygen injected furnace, also known as the funky old wood shop stove for a day.
    JB Welded in the unneeded grease ports.
    Pressed on 2 new SKF sealed bearings, made in France.
    Squirted on some nice sort-of- close to Baldor gray tractor paint.
    Baked on the finish with my temperature controlled curing booth, also known as setting it near the funky old wood shop stove.

    Done, runs quiet w/o the grease stink when it warms up, and looks good too.

    Didn't have to start a motor repair biz, locate the last can of trichlor in the Continental USA or sneak it out the backdoor in a brown paper sack all the while fearing it was a EPA undercover sting operation.
    Nor harm any animals while sprucing up this motor.

    Thanks for the advise,,,, and the well,,,entertainment.

  6. Likes dalmatiangirl61, Steven-Canada liked this post
  7. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,010
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8686

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug W View Post
    Thanks for the advise,,,, and the well,,,entertainment.
    "Igualmente". Yah just now gave as good as yah got!



    Damned drear week the only thing can be found as springboard to takin' the piss is a few gobs of grease in an ignorant 1-P motor.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Brake cleaner in a spray can, available at any auto parts store. Buy whatever's on sale, several cans can come in handy. I use it for degreasing bullet molds, electrical, etc. Works really well but DON'T use it indoors!

    A can of that along with a soft bristle brush will degrease just about anything.

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    758
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    99

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3006guns View Post
    Brake cleaner in a spray can, available at any auto parts store.
    Brake cleaner eats paint, not sure what it would do on the lacquer/shellac/mystery coating on windings.

    Suspect it would eat it too.

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    bainbridge island
    Posts
    1,179
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    241
    Likes (Received)
    280

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug W View Post
    Brake cleaner eats paint, not sure what it would do on the lacquer/shellac/mystery coating on windings.

    Suspect it would eat it too.
    hot water and lots of dawn dish soap is good enough.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •