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    Default Can anyone help me find a cover for an old enclosure?

    I've been working on an old W&S turret lathe, and the contactor enclosure that came with it, probably original, lost its front cover at some point back in the mists of history.



    I would like to either find a cover that fits, if possible, or a replacement enclosure. Doesn't have to be "original", this isn't a Barrett-Jackson restoration.

    The existing enclosure is approximately 9-1/2" x 13-1/2" at the lip of the opening. A cover would need to be roughly a least 3/4" taller than the lip, to clear the contactors and reset buttons inside.

    A replacement enclosure would have to be absolute minimum 13"x 9" inside, and even that's getting a little tight. And no more than about 4" deep.

    I have some wiggle room for wider/taller, but not a lot.

    Any good leads or suggestions welcomed.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    I've been working on an old W&S turret lathe, and the contactor enclosure that came with it, probably original, lost its front cover at some point back in the mists of history.



    I would like to either find a cover that fits, if possible, or a replacement enclosure. Doesn't have to be "original", this isn't a Barrett-Jackson restoration.

    The existing enclosure is approximately 9-1/2" x 13-1/2" at the lip of the opening. A cover would need to be roughly a least 3/4" taller than the lip, to clear the contactors and reset buttons inside.

    A replacement enclosure would have to be absolute minimum 13"x 9" inside, and even that's getting a little tight. And no more than about 4" deep.

    I have some wiggle room for wider/taller, but not a lot.

    Any good leads or suggestions welcomed.

    Doc.
    Match it to a stock NEMA size. Have a look at hinged covers sold separately, or salvage a cover from a recycle any of many brands that overlap, if not fit exactly and you may be able to leave it as-is, just add a hinge.

    Or DIY something other than the stock keyhole screws for the flat plate included with a close one from the hundreds of sizes Grainger/Zorro carry:

    Sample only. Not your specific size.

    Wiegmann SC101004NK $19.97 NEMA 1 10.0 in H x 10.0 in W x 4.0 in D Wall Mount Enclosure | Zoro.com

    I use the "NK" suffix to the SKU, which come smooth, No Knockouts and holesaw ONLY those needed and where wanted for a cleaner finished item.

    Ebay might actually display more to the page for faster selection.

    My last four for DIY electricals have arrived in 2 to 4 days from online order, lower 48.

    Decently made & painted. Lower cost than Hoffman.

    You want to sex it up, or save a buck, grab a ribbed cast aluminum "BBQ" stovetop grill from the poor-lady store or Good Will, ignorant aluminium angle to adjust size and stand-off/above depth, add a hinge or fasteners.

    Those make nice anti-roll-off tool trays, too. Shot of truck bed liner optional. The "no stick" coating or "Copper" usually wear-off in the kichen before I grab them for around the shop as more durable than plastic tool task trays.

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    I've bought starters just to get the enclosure. the rounded ones are older and much more difficult to source. what is the starter? A reversing starter of the same type is a good investment for parts anyway. Dave

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    Make a replacement out of plastic sheet stock. All you need is to protect you from getting a shock or getting chips in it. The odds of finding an exact replacement is small to none.

    Tom

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    It would not take much of a tin bender to make one...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    Make a replacement out of plastic sheet stock. All you need is to protect you from getting a shock or getting chips in it. The odds of finding an exact replacement is small to none.

    Tom
    Plastic? That shit cracks, crazes, melts, burns, and aint' even cheap in sections thick enough to trust.

    Steel or 'loominum are cheaper.

    It aint' but sheet metal.

    Working that from flat sheet if a store-bught fit or a baking pan won't do can be a Helluva lot faster and easier that digging a from-scratch shaft out of where it is hiding in a length of HRS bar stock.



    No box and pan brake? How wide yer largest vise? Ten-incher on the Alzmetall DP here.

    ADD, if need be.. a coupla rails of ignorant steel bar or angle to extend it only and inch or few each side? Poor man's brake takes shape. A "Long Island" 90-minute steel fire door has made a decent brake for thinner 'loominum when I needed wider.

    Drop the sides as far as yah like for a cover to rise-up and clear the goods inside.

    Or bend nada and rivet on DIY aluminium angle and/or U-channel to plain-jane flat plate to hit yer edge fit and provide the rise.

    Curved corner? Stop short, inside corner. Overhang with square, outside corner. Keeps cucarachas and mice outta making a nest is all.

    Dunno about Alaska. It does have its supply-chain challenges.

    But I can't be bothered HERE when Zorro can drop a NEMA-spec box on the doorstep for under thirty bucks that I don't really even have to PAINT, inside or out.

    Not as if I had yah have to fit a new one but onct every 60 year or so, is it?

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    Is that made by Allen Bradley?

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    Default W & S Controls

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    I've been working on an old W&S turret lathe, and the contactor enclosure that came with it, probably original, lost its front cover at some point back in the mists of history.



    I would like to either find a cover that fits, if possible, or a replacement enclosure. Doesn't have to be "original", this isn't a Barrett-Jackson restoration.

    The existing enclosure is approximately 9-1/2" x 13-1/2" at the lip of the opening. A cover would need to be roughly a least 3/4" taller than the lip, to clear the contactors and reset buttons inside.

    A replacement enclosure would have to be absolute minimum 13"x 9" inside, and even that's getting a little tight. And no more than about 4" deep.

    I have some wiggle room for wider/taller, but not a lot.

    Any good leads or suggestions welcomed.

    Doc.
    All that love you showed the W & S, but no attention to the motor or controls, hurts my eyes.
    You could likely replace the entire controller easier than finding a cover or making one for that obsolete starter. From your pictures it looks as though it has a problem already, and finding parts for it will be futile. It looks to be an old Westinghouse or Square D controller.



    From the pictures it appears as a two speed starter, due to the fact that it has two separate overload relays. If you just wanted an enclosure of the approximate size, you could look on ebay for reversing starters with enclosures the sizes will be very similar. Samples below.
    Allen Bradley 705 AAAB Size 0 Type 1 Reversing Switch Contactor Starter Ser. 705 | eBay
    CUTLER HAMMER SIZE 1 REVERSING MOTOR STARTER 120 VAC COIL 600 VAC 10 HP A50CN0 | eBay
    WESTINGHOUSE A210 REVERSING STARTER 220V 5HP 18A SIZE 1 | eBay

    If it were me, I would opt for a NEMA 3R (rain-tite) enclosure and mount your existing controls in there.
    Hoffman 18" x 18" x 6" Type 3R Screw Cover Box, Galvanized Steel | eBay

    Even better would be a used combination reversing starter, such as this one, oiltight enclosure with disconnect and fusing and room for two modern style starters.
    Square D Combination Motor Starter Reversing Size 1 Fusible 3R 8738 SCA24 | eBay
    s-l400.jpg

    Two speed starters are a bit more rare today, but they can be found with a bit of pecking.
    An ideal one would be a combination type factory mounted in it's enclosure with a disconnect. Here is an example of one that may be suitable for you for a fair price with current model starters.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/SQUARE-D-TW...AAAOSw0odbq9cj

    s-l800.jpg

    And a bare two speed starter for comparison.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Square-D-Co...QAAOSwKqBbSPU5

    I made some assumptions based on experience, but to pick something correct you really need some data on your motor. HP, motor tag info, voltage, winding type. I assume that yours is a two independent winding type winding, based on your starters and pusbutton station.

    Just some food for thought, or you could pound out a cover for your obsolete controls and hope for the best.

    SAF Ω

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAF View Post
    All that love you showed the W & S, but no attention to the motor or controls, hurts my eyes.
    -Apologies. Electrics aren't my strong suit. They're not even an old hand-me-down suit in the back of the closet I haven't worn in twelve years.

    Yes, I'm admittedly taking a bit of a risk with the original contactors- they DID work when I tested it, and I'm kind of hoping that the issue with the resets is due to being fed a 'dead leg' from a cheap static converter. Or the one broken wire in there. Or both.

    I've since upgraded to a better rotary/

    You could likely replace the entire controller easier than finding a cover or making one for that obsolete starter.
    -This isn't the only place I've asked around on, and unsurprisingly, no one's had a lead. I really wasn't expecting it to still be in production, but I did kind of hope I'd find somebody who had a stash of old parts out back.

    Anyway, I've since ordered an entire new enclosure, slightly larger, from McMaster.

    From your pictures it looks as though it has a problem already, and finding parts for it will be futile.
    -Fully agreed. If one or both of these fail, or still don't work even when properly wired and fed proper 3-phase, then yes, I'll be more than happy to replace them.

    From the pictures it appears as a two speed starter, due to the fact that it has two separate overload relays.
    -Yes, it's a two-speed motor. 2-1/2HP/700 RPM and 5HP/1400 RPM. I'm told it's an either/or system, one winding OR the other, but not both. There's a sort of "balance bar" in there at the bottom, that prevents one contactor from operating if the other is already engaged.

    Hoffman 18" x 18" x 6" Type 3R Screw Cover Box, Galvanized Steel
    -On issue is that I'm kind of tight on space. By necessity, I have to put the machine in the corner and up against a wall. Much larger than the original size will start causing issues, so I tried to get one as close as possible. The McMaster one is 2" taller and 2-1/2" wider, which is pretty much the best I could find.

    Two speed starters are a bit more rare today, but they can be found with a bit of pecking.
    An ideal one would be a combination type factory mounted in it's enclosure with a disconnect. Here is an example of one that may be suitable for you for a fair price with current model starters.
    -I may very well end up needing that. Assuming it will work with my setup. Apart from the info above, it's 230V, and I think a max of 13-point-something amps at high speed.

    [edit] And no, I don't need electrical reversing. Reverse is handled in the headstock gearing.

    I made some assumptions based on experience, but to pick something correct you really need some data on your motor. HP, motor tag info, voltage, winding type. I assume that yours is a two independent winding type winding, based on your starters and pusbutton station.
    -Yes, that's what I'm given to understand. I would not mind a bit replacing these, it's not like I need to keep it Concours original. This is very much going to be a working machine, so having reliable power is important.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil in Montana View Post
    It would not take much of a tin bender to make one...Phil
    -That was my backup plan. Earlier this spring, I made a set of four drawers for the fabricated cabinet stand of my Sheldon lathe:



    The problem is, my current workload and to-do list is packed. Right now, if I could get a ready-to-go enclosure for $60, that's worth not having to spend the time making my own. (Plus TIG welding up the half-dozen superfluous holes in the old box, assuming I didn't want to just snap a bunch of plugs in there.)

    Doc.

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    I would buy a chunk of aluminium and mill a custom cover. Get it thick enough so that you can bevel the exposed sides and corners.

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    The only way to find a replacement cover would be to find a vintage Allen-Bradley starter like it & rob the cover, the quickest and cheapest way is buy a new enclosure and install it, a NEMA type 12 dust tight, oil tight would be ideal if a used one could be found.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I would buy a chunk of aluminium and mill a custom cover. Get it thick enough so that you can bevel the exposed sides and corners.
    Yah, surely! May as well mill a clevis in it to mount the fast assault-boat launching davit hoist or the belt-fed Maxim gun while yer at it? Just in case of rioters or truant Orca's roaming the area?



    ISTR you had nothing more pressing to do, so actually DID TiG in hole fillers, bondo and paint?

    Probably for a high multiple of the cost I simply ordered brand-new "NK" without ANY holes, drilled four to bolt it on and two for the conduits.

    Averaging about twenty five bucks, each, and the holes go where I need them to be.

    Doc has more energy than I. Also far more s**t to do.

    And less "spare" time.

    "Get real!"

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    Default 2 Speed Motors and Magnetic Controls

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    Yes, that's what I'm given to understand. I would not mind a bit replacing these, it's not like I need to keep it Concours original. This is very much going to be a working machine, so having reliable power is important.
    Doc.
    A few more thoughts before you get too far along, don't want to see you waste time unnecessarily for things your unfamiliar with.

    Before you mount and wire your existing controls in a new enclosure and mount it, I suggest the following. Test the controls and motor first with your new RPC first. My guess is that your existing overload relays are toast, and irreplaceable as mentioned earlier.

    The reason I say that is, proper three phase should not affect the overload relay section. They are simple 1 pole thermal thermal switches with a mechanical re-settable latch mechanism. If they won't reset now, 3Φ power applied won't help them.

    My thought is they are damaged from running the machine on 1Φ power by the previous owner. That's what a static converter does, gets it started, then runs it on 1Φ. While doing so, the 1Φ legs then draw more current, 1.732 x more current or more. Repeated operation like this will cause thermal damage to the heater elements and the overload relay. Eventually enough heat damage occurs that it will no longer reset. That's where it seems to be when it got passed onto you. That 2 speed motor would be expensive to rewind or replace, so running without overload protection could prove expensive in the future.

    After reviewing your control setup a bit more, it appears certain to me that my original assumption on your motor type was incorrect. Your starter has 5 poles on one contactor and 3 poles on the other. That indicates that your 2 speed motor is a one winding two speed configuration, not a two independent winding two speed as thought earlier, due to the two sets of overloads. More commonly known ad a Two-speed, consequent pole motor in the US or a Dahlander in Europe. So therefore the magnetic starters shown earlier were the incorrect type, they were for a two winding two speed, a different but similar animal.

    Since I believe your going to need a new starter to replace your damaged overload relays, I will present some different information for you and the forum for when you get around to it.

    Just like the different naming conventions here in the US and Europe, the actual starters are configured differently as well. US (NEMA) versions use 2 contactors one with 5 poles and the other with 3, both having overload relays. The European style (IEC) uses 3 contactors with 3 poles each, 2 with overload relays and one without. For a given motor size and current ratings the NEMA styles usually take up less panel space. One less contactor, with two extra power poles added onto the high speed contactor.

    Here is a couple examples of the most popular and well supported NEMA versions. For your 5/2.5 HP motor running at 230V you will need a Size 1 unit. Also would require 2 sets of the proper heater elements, and most likely a control transformer as usually they come with 120V coils, something to check for and not take for granted before a purchase. Your existing coils are 230V since you have no control transformer.

    One more thing is the drawings show two motor types and connections. A variable torque type usually used for pumps and fans and a constant torque type used on machine tools and conveyors. The starters are the same but the connections at the motor are different,constant torque is the type you should have on the lathe.

    Allen Bradley. Diagram, Sample Picture, Used Equipment Links
    ab-2spd-1wnd-520-starter.jpg
    ab-520f-2spd-1wnd-starter.jpg
    Allen Bradley 520F-BOD 2 Speed Size 1 Motor Starter 25HP 600v 45 Amp 120v Coil | eBay
    Allen Bradley 520F-B0D Size 1 Reversing Motor Starter with 120V Coil | eBay
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...in+520+starter

    Next up is the Square D (Detroit) model, now called Schnider, sold off to the Germans.
    sqd-2spd-1wnd8810-typs-starter.jpg
    sq-d-8810sco2v06-ac-two-speed-1-wnd-magnetic-starter-nema-size-1.jpg
    https://stevenengineering.com/pdf/45NEMAMC_8810.pdf
    New Square D 8810SCO2V06 AC Two Speed Magnetic Starter Nema Size 1 | eBay
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Square-D-88...oAAOSwFxNevuEA
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...ype+S&_sacat=0

    And if your head is still not spinning with information overload I'll offer some additional reading material for future reference for you and other readers of the forum. Hopefully you have a control sparky handy that can help you with the diagrams and parts selection? The gray haired type, like in your RPC photos?

    http://www.industrial-electronics.co...trol_6-32.html

    https://pdhonline.com/courses/e106/e106_new.htm

    https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=con...e+motor&ia=web

    https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=con...ages&ia=images

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=dahlander+motor&t=ffab&ia=web

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=dahlander+...ages&ia=images

    SAF Ω

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAF View Post
    A few more thoughts before you get too far along, don't want to see you waste time unnecessarily for things your unfamiliar with.

    [
    Lovely work!

    Minor nits. Antoine Schneider and hs Dad were born in Lorraine. French, not German, though several business-brilliant and high-energy Schneiders I have know personally also happened to be of European Jewish ancestry. Which had to be hidden for many, certain countries and eras.

    Regardless, son Joseph Eugene Schneider was to become one of the most important industrial, economic, and political heavy lifters in France.

    Modern Groupe Schneider was, hopefully still IS, one of the most pragmatic and egalitarian of firms as a truly "pan global" employer of management talent, and "not only".

    ISTR Square-D was "mostly" HQ'd in the Nederlands for Europe, but it matters not.

    Schnieder - better, and for far longer, at the bizness of "success" than the average for France or ANYWHERE - also own, or HAVE owned, about half their competitors!

    Ergo Square-D was, and remains a "safe bet".

    Amazing what enterprising folks can cook up off a start in forges and their products:

    Le Creusot - Wikipedia

    A machinist can appreciate the kinship, yah?


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    Quite valuable information, sir. Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by SAF View Post
    Before you mount and wire your existing controls in a new enclosure and mount it, I suggest the following. Test the controls and motor first with your new RPC first.
    -I was leaning towards that. I probably should have done it a while ago, or better yet, before taking the machine apart, but I've had quite a few other things on my plate this summer.

    I'll see if I can't mock it up this coming week. Is there any other information I can get you?

    The reason I say that is, proper three phase should not affect the overload relay section. They are simple 1 pole thermal thermal switches with a mechanical re-settable latch mechanism. If they won't reset now, 3Φ power applied won't help them.
    -Are the "buttons" supposed to latch? (I'm not overly familiar with magnetic contactors- almost all my machines up to now have run on VFDs.)

    After reviewing your control setup a bit more, it appears certain to me that my original assumption on your motor type was incorrect. Your starter has 5 poles on one contactor and 3 poles on the other. That indicates that your 2 speed motor is a one winding two speed configuration, not a two independent winding two speed as thought earlier, due to the two sets of overloads.
    -If it would help, here's a higher-resolution image of the whole enclosure. The statric converter has been disconnected at this point, was was hooked to the three screw terminals at the upper right.

    Black wires heading up to the left are to the control buttons, and the white wires heading down to the left are to the motor.

    Since I believe your going to need a new starter to replace your damaged overload relays, I will present some different information for you and the forum for when you get around to it.
    -Fire away, sir. I've been kind of questioning the contactors since I got the machine, both for the issue of having to bypass the... resets? And the simple fact they're very likely eighty-plus years old, and have likely had many tens of thousands of cycles, if not hundreds of thousands.

    I did just order a replacement enclosure (just the box) a couple days ago, but that's no problem. I have alternate uses for that if it comes down to it.

    At this point, with the work I've put into the rest of the machine, I'd very much like to have an electrical system I can trust, as well. Can't say it's an expense I'm going to be happy to make, but one that likely needs to be done.

    For your 5/2.5 HP motor running at 230V you will need a Size 1 unit. Also would require 2 sets of the proper heater elements, and most likely a control transformer as usually they come with 120V coils, something to check for and not take for granted before a purchase. Your existing coils are 230V since you have no control transformer.
    -I'm afraid I'm somewhat out of my league here. If you wanted to spec something out from a reliable vendor for me, that might be for the best. Just let me know if you need any additional information about my setup. (Unfortunately I have no factory wiring diagrams- the manual doesn't contain any, and another fellow with a No.3 says his were in a pouch inside the enclosure.)

    Hopefully you have a control sparky handy that can help you with the diagrams and parts selection? The gray haired type, like in your RPC photos?
    -Diagrams, yes, not so sure on parts selection. That fellow is a retired IEBW type, and knows a thing or two about wiring, but from previous experience, he doesn't have a lot of experience with the actual machine contactors like this. He can help me wire, but won't be as much help at actual part selection.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    Quite valuable information, sir. Thank you!

    I'll see if I can't mock it up this coming week. Is there any other information I can get you?

    -Are the "buttons" supposed to latch? (I'm not overly familiar with magnetic contactors- almost all my machines up to now have run on VFDs.)

    -Fire away, sir. I've been kind of questioning the contactors since I got the machine, both for the issue of having to bypass the... resets? And the simple fact they're very likely eighty-plus years old, and have likely had many tens of thousands of cycles, if not hundreds of thousands.

    -I'm afraid I'm somewhat out of my league here. If you wanted to spec something out from a reliable vendor for me, that might be for the best. Just let me know if you need any additional information about my setup. (Unfortunately I have no factory wiring diagrams- the manual doesn't contain any, and another fellow with a No.3 says his were in a pouch inside the enclosure.)

    -Diagrams, yes, not so sure on parts selection. That fellow is a retired IEBW type, and knows a thing or two about wiring, but from previous experience, he doesn't have a lot of experience with the actual machine contactors like this. He can help me wire, but won't be as much help at actual part selection.

    Doc.
    Do your testing first to confirm that the overload relays are bad or good. In the marked up photo, the parts are called out. The reset button should reset(close) the lower overload contacts, you have 4 of them and they are wired in a series string. The small screws at the bottom of the overload relay, below the output terminals are where you should test for continuity. Remove one of the wires from each one and test each individually, the ones that read open (no continuity) are the bad ones.

    2spd-1win-starter-markup.jpg

    Sometimes you can get them to reset by pulling out the reset button gently, before trying to push in for the reset. Then measure the contact. If anyone of them are open, it will disable the starter coils from turning on.

    In order to help with part selection a picture of the motor tag or information is necessary.
    Can you read the number tags on the wires coming out of the motor windings?
    Is there a connection diagram on the motor or inside it's connection box?
    What are the numbers on the existing heater elements, there should be two sizes for two speeds.

    SAF Ω

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    Quote Originally Posted by SAF View Post
    Remove one of the wires from each one and test each individually, the ones that read open (no continuity) are the bad ones.
    -These connections, I'm assuming?



    (Yes, that wire was broken as-delivered.)

    If those are the ones, I have continuity between each pair of terminals on all four units. (With the wires removed.)

    The right-hand one on the left-hand contactor, however, looks like it got pretty badly overheated at some point.



    Still had continuity between the connections though. The screw was rather loose, and may have been the cause of that one overheating.

    In order to help with part selection a picture of the motor tag or information is necessary.
    -Ask and ye shall receive:



    Can you read the number tags on the wires coming out of the motor windings?
    -I will if I have to, but the entire wad coming out of the motor is a thoroughly taped lump.



    I'll open it if I have to, but at the moment I'd prefer to leave that alone if I could. The six large white wires are each tagged with "A" through "F". There's very little room inside the chassis- the motor pretty much takes up all the available volume.

    Is there a connection diagram on the motor or inside it's connection box?
    -No. Nothing of the sort anywhere on the machine, or in the service manual. I can try contacting Small Tools- the W&S service shop- and see if they have something, but that's about it.

    What are the numbers on the existing heater elements, there should be two sizes for two speeds.
    -These units?



    All four are stamped with both "81D" and "265". They're stamped with the same numbers, but not in the same style, suggesting at least some of them have been replaced at some point. (Might also explain why there's not two separate values.)

    Doc.

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    No joy on finding the specified GE connection diagram.

    Here is a(nother) Dahlander connection selector from Weg:

    https://www.wolfautomation.com/media...cs-catalog.pdf

    Pages 30 & 31.

    More than one way to wire those.

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    New pictures and data reveal more information.

    The motor tag and heater numbers reveal that the starter is also made by GE, an obsolete G3 model, back when GE was still producing their product out of Schenectady NY, just like the motor.

    Those heater numbers are obsolete and I have a cross reference for the newer model numbers. The ones on the high speed contactor are the correct size, but not so for the low speed. We can look up the required size for the low speed if the rest of the controls turn out OK.
    81D 265 heater element was replaced with a model CR123C151B which in that starter is rated for 12.9A to 13.2A

    The broken wire on the overload contact will definitely stop the control circuit from working properly. With it broken off I'm not sure how pushing the resets in with clamps gets it to come on anyway, it shouldn't without a complete path through all overload contacts. Connecting the wire should allow for a test, with all of the overload contacts having continuity.

    The contact that you say looks overheated and loose appears to me to be contaminated with old coolant or oil. The photos show the dried contaminates above the contact screw and all over the heater element and it's socket. Looks like it operated for a long time with the cover missing. The other contactor and wires appear to have the same dried drool.

    With your high resolution photo I see something else that looks troubling. The left five pole contactor appears to be hanging up on the right side of it. Notice that the movable contact carrier is stuck further up on the right side? and that the bakelite carrier is broken around the mounting screw? Something is mechanically binding and not allowing the movable contact carrier to drop fully down, as compared to the left side or the other contactor, this needs to be investigated, it should not be sticking up in the travel like that. That can cause the motor or control contacts to not open when they should.

    Push the contactor laminated metal armature upward and let it return downwards, to figure out why it's not fully returning all the way down. And did the binding cause the bakelite carrier to crack off. If you can resolve this issue, you may be able to use the existing starter.

    As to the motor lead numbering, as long as you made a map of where they were removed from, that shouldn't be a problem. Once you get things working correctly the leads could be relabeled with the standard numbers that are used on the conventional drawings, such as the Allen Bradley or Sq D given above. That way if you ever need to replace the starter, you will have the correct labels, to corresponding to a more modern drawing.

    Check those things first and we can proceed from there.

    SAF Ω


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