Electrical help for Goodway 1640
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  1. #1
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    Default Electrical help for Goodway 1640

    I have a Goodway Taiwan 16 inch lathe with a destroyed electrical system. I got it with the intention of changing out the motor, as I only have single phase power. I pulled the motor, and have no idea whether it works or not.
    I am not an electric-oriented person.
    Here is the plate from the motor:
    motor.jpg
    Here is the electric panel, the reason the lathe was scrapped:
    panel.jpg
    Anyway, I appreciate that I am way behind the knowledge curve here, but figured that somehow, I should be able to get a motor rigged with the original pulley system and get the otherwise functional lathe to run. Even if the HP and speed do not match original specs.

    Anyway, I guess I am asking generally where do you suggest I start? I assume there are test procedures for the motor, and if it functions, I need to decide if it is better to try to modify my electric system, or just go for a whole new motor, with simplified wiring.

  2. #2
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    Don't disconnect any of the wires. Trace all the wiring and make a detailed drawing. Then understand what it does. Then do a reconstruction on the box. I didn't know that they used Taiwanese lathes in Syria.

  3. #3
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    Most or all of the wires are labeled. However, I have been putting additional labels on the wires and each component as I disassemble them. Of course, some of the components are completely destroyed.
    At this point, the damaged panel has been removed. The wires to all the switches, indicators, and components on the body of the lathe are in place and fairly self explanatory.
    When I say I am not electric oriented, that really means I don't know much about wiring these sorts of motors.
    I am able to make sense of most of what was in the panel. I can at least understand the fuses, motor overload relays, and a transformer, which looks to function to supply 110v to the coolant pump and some of the switches. There are a number of contactors or relays. Those things all make sense to me.
    My issue is really the main motor. I am not sure how to test it, as I do not have three phase power. If it is functional, I am not sure whether to try to use a phase converter, which I also know nothing about, or if I would be better off finding a single phase motor.
    I am not committed to the idea of the lathe running exactly to original specs. I accept the possibility of putting a tach on it, and compiling new speed tables for the various gearing. As long as I am not running it in ways that could damage the machine.

  4. #4
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    Take the motor to a motor shop and have it tested ! If good 3 new contactors with control coil voltage to match what you have [probably the 110 on the transformer] . A basic rotary converter that is twice the lathe motor HP and you are good.

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    If you change out the motor to single phase you most likely will get a single speed motor which will only give you half the speeds the lathe has now. If the motor checks out good you could look at building a phase converter and redoing the control box for high and low speeds.There are plenty of wiring diagrams on line that will cover a 2 speed 2 hp rated motors.i think you would end up for a lot more low end grunt for heavy turning and drilling.With a standard 1750 rpm motor you would not have the slow speeds available.I think you would need 5 contactors as 3 required to switch from low to high and then for forward reverse you need 2 more.

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    Would an affordable phase converter run the 3 phase motor at low speed? What about static ones? The low range of the motor is 3hp, the high is 7hp. I don't really need to run the lathe at the top end. With the lathe gearing, there is a large overlap in spindle speeds with the two motor speeds. Low gives me a lower low end, and high would give me a higher high end spindle speed.
    I am halfway into figuring out how to get a DC motor to run the lathe, but that is turning into a very complicated project as well.
    I am just confused at this point.
    Also, I am not 100% sure that the three phase motor is good. The resistance and continuity checks are good, and it turns smoothly. I took it into town, and the motor guy told me he has a $150.00 minimum charge just to look at it, so that was not happening.
    Good advice needed badly.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadboy65 View Post
    Also, I am not 100% sure that the three phase motor is good. The resistance and continuity checks are good, and it turns smoothly. I took it into town, and the motor guy told me he has a $150.00 minimum charge just to look at it, so that was not happening.
    Good advice needed badly.
    Usually, these induction motors are pretty robust.
    I'd recommend to check resistance between all phases and also between phases and the stator housing to check if there is a short circuit to the housing.

    Max

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    I performed those tests, and it passed. I cannot remember what the resistance was, but it matched what the motor guy said to look for.
    (advice from him was free, but if he touched a motor, the charges started at $150.00)

  9. #9
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    I also have an Asian built lathe with a two speed, six wire Dahlander winding motor and have done a fair bit of internet searching on it and these motors in general.
    There are at least three different arrangements for the powering and interconnection of the six wires at the motor control relays and switches - one for constant torque, one for variable torque, and one for constant horsepower. Your motor appears to be constant torque as the horsepower drops 50% when the RPMs drop 50%. To the best of my knowledge, only one of these wiring arrangements will work correctly for a given motor. If I were in your position I would contact TECO to try to get the correct information for your motor and try to get the operators manual and parts manual for your lathe in hopes of getting the full wiring diagram for the lathe. Short of these steps, I would feel very uncomfortable trying to safely and correctly wire the motor controls.
    Good luck,
    Monoblanco

  10. #10
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    A single phase motor is very likely to be much larger in size, if the motor is in the base this could be a problem. Also reversing a 3 phase motor is easier.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  11. #11
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    I am waiting to hear back from Teco, the motor manufacturer. One thing is certain, searching for the motor type (AECPXX) on the net or the manufacturer's website is pointless.
    Reading the available Teco literature, motor wiring is pretty much ignored, while details such as the pitch of the assembly screw threads are described and illustrated very carefully.

  12. #12
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    Factorymation
    Has great Teco tech help. It is best if you buy from them. just act like you have an idea that you are thinking about doing / buying a drive.


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