Haas-Kamp conversion for Miller CP-300, and CP-302 200-230-460 - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    No, something is not connected right. It should be able to burn like the sun. Recheck connections one-by-one... and make sure you don't have a broken lead or terminal from the back of the terminal strip.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveKamp View Post
    No, something is not connected right. It should be able to burn like the sun. Recheck connections one-by-one... and make sure you don't have a broken lead or terminal from the back of the terminal strip.
    Okay, so I didn't find any obvious broken wires. I did check OCV, and the OCV when set to 22v is 15v. The feeder is getting 125v. At the contactor, I measured L1 - L2 at 63v, L2-L3 at 53v, and L1-L3 at 35V. This leads me to believe I DO have a problem on the L1-L3 phase, but I'm hoping you all can help me narrow down what connections to look at.

    Attached is the original diagram.
    img_20190706_214313.jpgimg_20190706_214313.jpg

  3. #23
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    Here's how I have it wired, with 132uF per leg. I still haven't run it with wire yet because the contactor is very loud (getting 120V to it, I cleaned it out, still no good, but no chatter at all when I push it in manually). With 132uF per leg, I am getting 260VAC at no load across the middle leg primary, which seems very high. Is anyone seeing this high of voltage across the middle primary? Both capacitor legs are showing 100VAC.
    cp-300-h-k-wiring.jpgimg_20190706_102411185.jpg
    Last edited by jjohn76; 07-07-2019 at 11:28 AM.

  4. #24
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    I don't know for sure, but I don't think 260vac across the middle primary with no load is too high - it will sag considerably under load.

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    B.Reilly, my feeder is still down, but I just checked my voltages at the contactor - at 22V on the crank, I see 15V on the meter, and the voltages measure 33V L1-L3, 33V L2-L3, 13V L1-L2. Not sure if this helps. I am using 132uF, measured on each leg. Also, the frame that supports my transformer gets hot- suspecting this is due to the change flux through the transformers.
    Updates - measuring VAC across the primary coils, I get 240VAC on the outside legs, and 260VAC on the middle leg. Both capacitor each capacitor bank has 100VAC across it. I guess what that tells me is I have quite a bit of phase shift.
    Last edited by jjohn76; 07-08-2019 at 09:38 AM.

  6. #26
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    Dave,

    One thing I noticed different between my machine and the diagram you originally modified, my machine is delta on the secondary, whereas yours is Y. Is that an issue?

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    If I understand it correctly, this version of the H-K conversion uses the Delta output because the primary coils are better matched to the input voltage with the green "400V" jumpers.

    Also, I have been manually actuating my contactor and when I hold it just right, it gives 28V OCV at the output when cranked to 22V.

  8. #28
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    Hey Dave, would it be possible to get a little more heat here by using 460v jumper and deleting the green jumpers?

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    B.reilly, the link below shows how to do the H-K on the 200/230/460V CPs using 460V jumpers and wye output. Mine was set up this way and welding well, but the contactor kept buzzing and getting worse. My contactor was only getting ~90VAC with the original H-K conversion, which is why I switched to the 400V jumpers and Delta output. When I pulled my contactor apart, it only had 20% surface contact across the armature and the contacts were beaten up, which I think is why I had the problems with the 460V jumper setup. The original conversion works well with 130uF across each leg. I haven't experimented with capacitor values to see which works well just yet, which is why I am concerned with 260VAC across the middle leg @ no load.

    Here is the link:
    Here is my machine. Please note the face plate specifications and the wiring diagram. | Miller CP300 Haas-Kamp Single Phase Conversion

  10. #30
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    Here are a few short beads on 2x2x1/4" scrap. The crank was set for 34VOCV, and it was showing around 24V and 160 amp. I still need to get the settings right, but didn't have any issues with beads stacking up.
    img_20190715_160407774.jpg img_20190715_160313106.jpg

  11. #31
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    Is anyone here located in or around Atlanta GA, who might be willing to help me with a CP300 conversion?
    I know this rewiring is PHYSICALLY easy to perform, but I just don't have the electrical knowledge to successfully do this conversion myself with any real amount of confidence.
    I truly appreciate anyone even willing to consider helping me out with this.

  12. #32
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    Paul, I wish I were closer. Every wire is labeled inside, so long as the welder is cleaned inside. Here is my machine. Please note the face plate specifications and the wiring diagram. | Miller CP300 Haas-Kamp Single Phase Conversion walks through it pretty well with pictures, if that site helps you. I was just running some .045 gas shielded flux core I had from a trade,and had the CP-300 near max (42V OCV on the crank orange tape), and it was "only" pushing 230 amps at 24Von 1/4" wall square tubing. The only reason for trying the .045 FCAW-G is because I have 66# of it. This is on the high inductance tap setting, and I am planning to try the low inductance tap setting.

    img_20190721_145519628.jpg

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    Looking further into the 24V, 230 amp output near max, I have not seen what these CP-300s do on three phase, but the graph below overlays the three phase outputs for the Miller CP-200, CP-250TS, and CP-300. I did this because the CP-200 and CP-300 only show flat slope outputs, which is off their low inductance tap. The CP-250TS 14-tap output inductor/reactor measures about the same as the high output inductor/reactor for the CP-300 at about 194mH. I didn't measure this across the amperage range, so it doesn't take into account any saturation effects, and the transformer plays a role in the inductance too, so this comparison isn't perfect. But looking at the CP-250TS chart, the 12-tap setting runs rights across that 230amp 24V output, so I think this CP-300 is doing close to what it should do on three phase. I don't have enough experience to know, but this beast definitely burns a deeper puddle than my old Hobart Ironman ever did.

    Update - I switched the work lead to the low inductance tap and didn't see too much difference, except a bit more spatter.

    cp-200-300-250ts-v-curves.jpg
    Last edited by jjohn76; 07-21-2019 at 11:08 PM.

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    jjohn, thanks for the link. I'll definitely check it out. One of my main questions is in regards to capacitors. I think oul filled, motor run are preferred. Over 370v AC and as far as mfd rating I'm not so sure what I should need to have on hand. Read many threads but still unsure.
    Secondly, can anyone tell me if there will be a different wiring setup for a CP302?. I plan on obtaining a 302 tomorrow as well possibly.

  15. #35
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    Paul, I used the oil filled ones rated for 370/440. An eBay search shows the ones I used 60/5 uf (there are three terminals on top,so I built a little jumper between the two positive terminals to get 65uF), and also have the 65uF CBB65A 450V oil filled run capacitors. The CBB65A are a little more expensive, but they're smaller and a little easier to fit, but both styles fit right below the fan in the back of the CP-300s. You need 4 total, or whatever adds up to about 130uF on each leg. It looks like the CP-302 is a little bigger, and I think it uses SCRs instead of a contactor to keep the electrode hot only when you press the mig trigger. Either way, you should be able to pull the serial number to get the manual (there should be a wiring diagram on the inside of the panel too). Hope this helps,
    Jon

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    After experimenting with both the low and high inductance taps, the max arc voltage I can get is ~25V, which is below the recommended spec for the FCAW-G wire I am using. It had no problem delivering 25V @ 280 amps on a 30 amp breaker for some tests, and I don't really think I need more power than that for the mig welding I plan to do (.045 solid wire). I might just try the wye output at the contactor (400V taps so I get the full 125V to the contactor and feeder) and keep it lower on the voltage scale for the rest of this FCAW-G wire. With the wye output, I should be able to get around 37V max working, which may sag a bit when I up the wire feed/amperage. This will limit the min OCV to 17V, but that should be good for any welding I could do. B.Reilly, did you try your machine with the wye output?

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjohn76 View Post
    After experimenting with both the low and high inductance taps, the max arc voltage I can get is ~25V, which is below the recommended spec for the FCAW-G wire I am using. It had no problem delivering 25V @ 280 amps on a 30 amp breaker for some tests, and I don't really think I need more power than that for the mig welding I plan to do (.045 solid wire). I might just try the wye output at the contactor (400V taps so I get the full 125V to the contactor and feeder) and keep it lower on the voltage scale for the rest of this FCAW-G wire. With the wye output, I should be able to get around 37V max working, which may sag a bit when I up the wire feed/amperage. This will limit the min OCV to 17V, but that should be good for any welding I could do. B.Reilly, did you try your machine with the wye output?
    I haven't yet tried the wye output, I'm sure I can crank the dial and get higher OCVs, but the whole idea behind this conversion is that it performs close to 3 phase output. I did run mine on 3 phase prior to converting, and actually have a second, nearly identical machine so I can run them side-by-side. For Wye-output, I need to switch the primary side all around as well, right?

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    I wasn't planning to switch the primary side back to the 460V settings because I would rather 125V get to the contactor and my feeder. The output voltage will be a bit higher at max settings (max OCV will be closer to 60V RMS compared to about ~51V RMS if you switched the primary), but that is still well below the 300V breakdown voltage of the rectifier (600V total).

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    Switched the output to wye and this beast runs much hotter. To recap, I am using 130UF across each leg, setup the primary with the 400V taps, then setup the secondary with wye. This gets full voltage to my feeder and contactor. Max OCV is just North of 70V at a crank voltage of 44V. I ran the .045 FCAW-G with the crank set at 33V OCV, and the panel read 305amps at 29V, which was way hot on the hand and way faster than I could move. Somehow I am not tripping the 30 amp breaker running a few 3" beads, but this machine is a beast!

    img_20190728_173401193.jpg img_20190728_173434344.jpg
    Last edited by jjohn76; 07-28-2019 at 10:17 PM.

  20. #40
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    Hi John,

    This is great! What kind of OCV are you getting with the dial set to what you were running in your test? Is it closer? Did you resolve your contactor issue? I'm going to be making a video of my conversion so that others can find this easier. I don't know about where you are, but here these welders are a dime a dozen because they are 3 phase. I bought 1 of my 2 for 23 dollars, the other for around 70 dollars.

    Thanks,

    Ben


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