Haas-Kamp conversion for Miller CP-300, and CP-302 200-230-460 - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 68 of 68
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    1,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    As for the inductance setting, I *think* its the factory setting (not sure if thats low or high?) But wires #25 and 26 are hooked to the middle and top tabs. The very bottom most tab is folded straight down and appears that its never been touched.
    Those sorry instructions in the manul are difficult at best to understand with regards to the inductance settings. It reads as if a chinese kindergarten student wrote them. I swear.
    Again, not sure which setting this actually is. (High/low)

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Paul, my three phase experience is with motors, and DC brushless motors at that, where proper phasing matters, so someone else will hopefully chime in on the phasing effects on the transformer. I don't think it matters, and think you will be set once you clean up all power connections. If it still doesn't work, then it may be worth exploring the phasing (I would put the ghost leg on L2 and don't think the orientation of the other two legs matters). And the more I think about it, the less I think the phasing matters for three phase transformers.
    Your feeder dial is most likely not in ipm. It looks like it goes from 70 (figure around 10 on the dial) to 750 ipm (figure around 100 on the dial). I figured 160 ipm because it takes about 100 amps to melt .035 wire at 160 ipm. What is your wire size? That wire feed speed seems a little low though. Were you getting a consistent 100 amps? You will either need to measure the wire feed speed for different dial settings, or figure out what amperage you want and play with the dial to get there. I use the Miller welder calculator on the Millerwelds.com resources tab to get close on amps, then voltage to get enough penetration without spatter, then tweak if I don't get enough penetration or if I burn through).

    The only reason why I asked about the inductance tap because it seems like your volts are sagging pretty low from the 25V OCV. If you're in the manual, Z tap is the low inductance setting (middle tab), Z end is the high inductance setting (bottom tab). The high inductance setting will give you flatter, more fluid welds, but will require a higher voltage on the dial to get the same working voltage (that's what I mean by it sagging more). For CO2/Argon and .035 @ 100 amps, volts are around 17-18V for a good bead with little spatter.
    Hope this helps.
    Jon

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    1,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Ok so yes I'm at low inductance setting, middle tab. Also using .035 wire, and 75/25 gas. I ran a nice bead this evening with the machine set to 25v and just under 50 on the wfs. Wish I could post pics from mobile on this forum. It was a nice bead.
    It seems most of my issues were with the feeder all along. I cleaned drive rolls and also noticed the "spring liner" out at the tip of the gun was down too far in the neck of the mig gun. Its been years, but as I recall, this spring liner is supposed to actually come up into the brass diffuser? (before the copper 035 tip) and secure via the tiny setscrew. I did this and 90% of my feeding problems vanished.
    I will have to think up an easy way to physically measure wire feed speed so as to make up a conversion chart/diagram. Not quite sure what I've got to meadure how fast the wire protrudes though.
    Anyhow, as for the 302, I will continue running it on the RPC and next will be an H/K conversion for the CP300 so as to compare performance of not only the machines, but their power sources. Still have to source the CP300 contactor and fan motor first. I saw the specs you posted on fan motor. Not sure if frame/mounting is generally the same on all motors that size but will do my best to find cheaper alternatives to Miller oem.
    Can't thank you enough John. I learn something from every post you've been so kind to make.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    1,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    FYI those settings above of 25v and almost 50 on the wfs with 035 wire and 75/25 mix were on 1/4" plate.
    Does this seem to be lagging/underpowered to you? I'm assuming ocv open current voltage is the analog dial reading when not welding?
    I don't have a current reading meter at thr moment and havent rigged up a way to test voltage (under load while physically welding) as I'm solo in the shop. I'll get a buddy over here or rig up a way to do it by myself soon though.
    Fluke 376FC is in my near future. I need capacitance and a clamp on ammeter like yesterday.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Paul, sounds like you have it running well. If you're getting a good bead with penetration, then you're probably over well over 100 amps and 18V. The Miller welding calculator recommends starting parameters around 180-190 amps (to get wire feed speed for .035 steel, multiply by 2, so about 360-380 ipm) and 21-22V, which makes sense with your feeder dial (50% of the max 700ipm is 375 ipm) and OCV of 25V. To measure wire speed, you can press the trigger for 6 seconds, measure how much wire came out in inches, and add a zero to the end of that measurement. I haven't messed around with the inductance tap too much, but think the high inductance setting should work better for the wire and metal thickness you're welding. Here's a link to a Miller article on welder settings, as well as a link to their welding calculator. The only thing I noticed on OEM fan motors is a longer shaft. The Miller 116190 fan is the newer version of the one you quoted, and Profax makes a replacement that is a bit cheaper.

    Also, I just go to the full site on my smart phone to post pics. I need to resize the web page everytime I open it, but get to post pics. I usually prop my smartphone near the panel meters and take a video while welding to figure out working voltages and amperages. I trust them enough to get close then adjust based on the bead.

    Congratulations!
    Jon

    Welding parameters MIG Welding: Setting the Correct Parameters | MillerWelds

    Welding calculator MIG Solid-Cored Weld Setting Calculator | MillerWelds

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    And just to throw out another plug for the older transformers, the Miller XMT 304 can be a major troubleshooting time sump if the main board starts to get dodgy and you don't want to pay the $800+ to get another one. On the one I am fixing now, the lift arc circuit makes a buzzing sound it isn't supposed to make, and I think I tracked it down to either the 15V power supply capacitor or a misbehaving opamp in an integrated circuit (a black "chip" on the board). To get there, I had to rebuild and reconfigure a pair of contactors (Miller is on at least it's third generation and the previous generations are obsolete, the current $300 ones cost more than the originals despite being Chinese components and have different spacing so they would need a new $500+ interconnect board), check specs and mounting torque for every power component, then work through the schematics to figure out what the test points mean and why the contactor control is causing the machine to buzz. Ultimately, it's because the machine is trying to supply 7V open circuit from the main transformer, which is like trying to fill a tea cup with water from a firehose...

    I enjoy the troubleshooting, but just saying...

    Jon

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    1,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Hey john, thanks so much. I will have more time to play with it later today. Honestly, I need to figure out how to wire in some run caps to balance the legs a little better. From what I read its just good practice. I built this RPC, but still unsure how to balance it (wire hookups I mean)
    I've passed on many $500-$1000 XMT power sources. Always seemed suspect to me, especially when seller states unknown working condition.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Yup, unknown working condition to me means no more than $200, if that. Of the dozen I rebuilt, this one is the only one that had board problems. The others are back in use with new friends who keep sending me other stuff to fix at hobby wages (parts + free labor). I am blown away by the repair shops that charge $100/hour. Gold plated welders...

    Good luck with the RPC. It seems like there is a lot of good RPC help on this side!

    Jon


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •