Help converting a 1 HP 440 volt 3 phase Hardinge Lathe for home use ?
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  1. #1
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    Default Help converting a 1 HP 440 volt 3 phase Hardinge Lathe for home use ?

    Title says it all . I brought home a old HC125A Hardinge metal lathe and I am looking for advice on how to convert it to my home electrical . Your help is greatly appreciated .
    Please click on picture
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails hardinge-lathe-motor.jpg  
    Last edited by BartW; 04-03-2020 at 01:03 PM.

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    One option is to take your single phase 220v and convert it to 220v 3ph with a rotary phase converter then get a 3ph transformer to boost your now 220v 3ph to 440v 3ph. There are probably several threads explaining it in great detail.
    Regards Z

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    2 speed 480 volt motor, you dont have any good quick fixes, If it was mine I would use a 240/ 480 2kw transformer 1 phase and a 480 volt 3kw vfd to make 3 phase witch would also give you a veri speed...Phil

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    Thanks Z
    I have been looking for threads that match my needs with the exact parts used to remedy my situation .

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    No need for exact matches. The absolute best solution will be for you to replace that motor with a single speed version. There are only two things you need from that data plate to make it as painless as possible. 1) the RPM rating 2) the frame size. If you're worth you're salt the frame won't be much of an issue.

    A new motor will likely only be found in a dual voltage arrangement, i.e. 240/480. The diagram on the motor will tell you which leads to tie together and which to send power to.

    Get yourself an inverter/vfd with vector capabilities. If you plan to operate the motor below 30 Hz and/or heavily loaded at low speeds then get a small cooling fan and rig it to the end bell for additional cooling. An inverter rated motor will last longer, but if you get a new unit it will do the home machinist just fine without the rating.

    As mentioned, a transformer will work, but it tosses in efficiency issues and a loss of power output from your motor.

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    I agree it would be easier and probably cheaper to replace the motor. If you get the same frame size it will install with no mods necessary. Just bolt it in and go. Your motor plate list the frame size as 215. I looked it up. A 215 is normally a 5-10 HP motor, which is a big ass motor.

    I can't imagine it actually being that big. Here's a link to a chart that might help you determine exactly what frame size you need.

    https://www.surpluscenter.com/images/techhelp/nema2.pdf

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    Given that there are other motors on an HC and plenty of controls in the cabinet I wouldn't say replacing the spindle motor is the right solution unless you want to be reverse engineering and replacing a lot of other stuff. Maybe it's just me but I love the Hardinge 2 speed controls and wouldn't want to replace them or put in the effort to get them to work with a VFD.

    It's annoying but I would also recommend the phase converter to xformer solution. And yes, these motors are giant for their HP ratings!

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    Bart,

    I did this years ago for a friend of mine, don't remember if it was 2 speed. At the time a single phase 480v single phase input vfd was available. A single phase 120/240 or 240/480 power transformer wired as an auto transformer to provide 480v single phase to the VFD, VFD output directly to the 480v machine input. Possibly now use a 480v three phase input VFD downgraded by half for single phase input. Be sure, if the VFD has phase protection, you can turn it off. I think this is the same setup that Phil mentioned.

    Can't comment on the rotary setup since I've never done one.

    IMO In any case I wouldn't change the motor or controls from the original Hardinge.

    440 3ph at home from 220 1ph

    Good Luck,
    Joe


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