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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzleja View Post
    It looks like you've put a fair amount of work into this project. I also have a CV-400 that I would like to convert to single phase. I am interested in seeing your final solution. Thanks for going through the effort and sharing your findings with us all.
    Yeah, its been a fair amount of work. I still have only successfully converted one CV-400, and I don't understand why at this point.

    I'm still working on getting it "right", before I post the solution. I may have to just post the solution I have with a disclaimer.

    I have not had a lot if time lately to do any testing, so that's why I've been silent for a while...

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    Sorry I've totally missed the latter two-thirds of your experimentation... just too darned busy these days...

    But the reason why it's sensitive to capacitance, is because the capacitor size works in conjunction to the reactive characteristics of the transformer core, and those characteristics change based on LOAD.

    On the CP series, the output control is by virtue of a 'tapped' secondary... it is variable. On your machine, the output tapping is 'fixed' at one point, and 'throttled' by virtue of solid-state devices. This means it's attitude and loading play on a different shape ballfield. The switch idea is just fine, but as you noted, you're driving a nail with a wrecking ball- that horse wants to run. ;-)

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by CADman_KS View Post
    Yeah, its been a fair amount of work. I still have only successfully converted one CV-400, and I don't understand why at this point.

    I'm still working on getting it "right", before I post the solution. I may have to just post the solution I have with a disclaimer.

    I have not had a lot if time lately to do any testing, so that's why I've been silent for a while...
    I definitely understand how that goes. I have had my share of on-again off-again projects as well. (My CV400 has been collecting dust for the last 2 years or so in my barn as a side project.) I agree with the disclaimer... even if you get robust solution and have the math to back it up. These 400A welders are quite the hoss on 3ph, a company I worked for had a small fleet of these in our fab shop and they will flat-out melt some iron. I am interested to see how your switch setup works for "thick" and "thin" materials as well since I always had to do a fair amount of playing to weld anything thin with these welders.
    This project makes me think I should've paid a little more attention in Circuits.

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    Been trying to find the final schematics on this project so that I may do the same conversion. CAN ANYONE PLEASE HELP?!? TIA.

  5. #65
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    Default Final solution CV/DC 400...

    Quote Originally Posted by CADman_KS View Post
    ...

    I'm still working on getting it "right", before I post the solution. I may have to just post the solution I have with a disclaimer.

    ...
    My apologies to the group. I did not do my due diligence, and post up the final solution that I had, as I promised I would.

    First off, let me reiterate that the "solution" is only partly such. For DC400 machines, this solution works very well, and the machine is very stable thru almost all of the range. It will weld really well at lower amps, and at higher amps.

    For CV400 machines, however, the solution is the same, BUT, they don't tend to weld as well down lower in the amperage range. And, it's not like there's a cut-off point, that I can say, below X amps, it will not work. Sometimes it works at the lower amps, but is very unpredictable, and most of the time, the arc is very unstable at the lower amps. For my CV400, I typically don't use it on any steel less than 1/8", and that's pushing it. You weld really hot, and keep moving really quickly, and you'll be fine. Generally speaking, it likes 3/16" and above. When it's in the 3/8" range, it is a metal melting monster. For me, that's not an issue, since I have a Miller 170 which handles all of the "thin" stuff. So, to that end, I have not spent a lot of time trying to make the CV400 weld at lower amps. I have tried lowering the total capacitance for lower amperages, and it didn't really make a difference, and in fact, probably made it worse. So, I finally decided to just leave it a the stated value all the time, and weld hot and fast.

    I have attached what I used for the final solution on both the DC400 and CV400 machines.

    Good luck to anyone out there attempting to modify one of these beasts! They are definitely nice machines when they work, for sure!

    This is the final schematic that I used:
    final-cv400_dc400-schematic-240v.jpg

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    I think I may have deleted my last post. Rookie mistake. I apologize. This response is to CADman_KS. I also live in Kansas, Spring Hill to be exact. I do not have very much electrical experience, as I am just working on my metal fabrication degree. I was wondering if you may have the time or patience to help me convert this machine? I would be willing to pay for any help that I could get. I would really hate to damage this machine due to ignorance on my part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rik Powell View Post
    I think I may have deleted my last post. Rookie mistake. I apologize. This response is to CADman_KS. I also live in Kansas, Spring Hill to be exact. I do not have very much electrical experience, as I am just working on my metal fabrication degree. I was wondering if you may have the time or patience to help me convert this machine? I would be willing to pay for any help that I could get. I would really hate to damage this machine due to ignorance on my part.
    I sent you a PM...

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    Again, my sincere apologies to the community for not posting up the solution after I got it working.

    I put it all together in a PDF file, and here is the link to that:

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1iw...Bk63QoDcZDu2fS

    I have successfully converted both DC-400's and CV-400's. However, the CV-400's have never really worked as "good" as the DC-400's. I should qualify that: The CV-400's work GREAT when you're welding with high voltage and high wire speed. Meaning, you need to be welding something THICK, and you need to be moving FAST! The DC-400's don't seem to exhibit this same issue, and they will weld down at 19V with no issues. But, when the voltage on a CV-400 is 19-22V, not so good. It's very unpredictable at those voltages, and sometimes doesn't weld at all.

    But, recently I've discovered, sort of by accident, that if I do NOT use the LN-9 wire feeder controller to do the voltage adjustment, but rather do the voltage adjustment on the machine, it seems to weld a lot better at lower voltages. At least it CAN weld thinner stuff now. That was pretty much impossible before. I don't know if the CV-400 is just new enough that it's too smart for it's own good, or what it's issue is, but it does seem to work without the LN-9 controlling everything.

    Good luck with these conversions!!!

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    Can I just put the capacitor bank anywhere on the L2 line?

    I am converting a DC400 and after studying the final schematics it appears my welder is already wired the way it show with a single exception. Where you have double tapped the connection on L2 for the 1/7 & 8/2. I decided to pull a seperate split phase line for each hot line. This is to hopefully provide some load balancing in the load center.

    So as far as I can tell, the only thing that is really changed is that there is a capacitor bank on the L2 line. If so, I would MUCH prefer to mount it in its own box beside the disconnect.

    Thoughts?

    BTW SUPER BIG THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO HAS CONTRIBUTED ,HASS, KAMP, CADman AND PRACTICAL MACHINIST WEBSITE!!

    I would not be doing this at all if not for the information here.

  10. #70
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    Digging up a zombie thread. Hope this will be a good enough reason.

    This is concerning a Lincoln Idealarc R3S-325. Converting to single phase.
    Reading a lot of posts about doing the conversion and finding this utube vid

    Lincoln R3S-325 3ph To Single Phase Conversion w/capacitor - YouTube

    pointed me in the right direction. I have converted the machine " Well " It at least turns on, I haven't tried to weld anything yet.

    Hoping someone can explain my using an online calculator without understanding it's how and why's.

    Someone smarter or understands better. I have been playing around on online calculators, using different uf. 1st using a capacitor resistance calculator uf + 60Hz and " for the states" and 2nd inputting that resistance + 220v in the phase shift calculator. The different uf gives the same angle shift 45 ° and 155.56 voltage. But it does change the Currant/Amps, the larger the uf the more amps.

    45uf = 58.9463R = 2.64A
    50uf = 53.0516R = 2.93A
    70uf = 37.894R = 4.11A

    Please Wait... | Cloudflare

    RC-Series circuit, online calculator

  11. #71
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    Since this thread is on a totally different unit, you should, instead, start a new post with title appropriate for the make and model.

    In a 'general' sense, increasing capacitance will increase current flow, but based on reactive and resistance load levels, and your applied voltage, the indicated voltage will vary, and will be rather difficult to calculate with precision. Getting it 'in the range' will happen best by empirical (trial) process.

    Don't use 60hz as the calculation basis... when I first scratched out the idea, my original discussion with Peter included 60hz as the calculation point, I later realized that I'd overlooked (or rather, just taken-for-granted) that aspect, but in actuality, the conversion uses single-phase in a three-phase transformer to result in a 'pseudo-quadrature' operation... meaning, each incoming cycle resulted in circulation rate equivalent to 80hz in the transformer core... so if you're trying to generate a tight mathematical proof, use 80hz, rather than 60... you'll be much closer in POSSIBLE current...

    but what ACTUALLY flows, and the phase shift you'll ACTUALLY measure, is more dependant upon the welding voltage and current you're set to, the stickout distance, wire feed rate, and the quality of your ground clamp's return current flow capacity.

  12. #72
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    Thank you DaveKamp.

    Nice explanation on what is happening. It turned on a few light bulbs, to try a couple different ways of leveling out the available amp draw on the phantom leg.

    Measuring the individual amp draw of L1 & L2 while welding. Then matching the L3 capacitance to match L1 & L2.

    The welder will only draw the needed capacitance, not force whatever capacitance down it's throat.
    Last edited by minipower; 07-24-2021 at 01:47 PM.


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