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    Go buy a dedicated generator/motor set. IC engines are made to run 'flat-out.' We throttle them for our vehicles. The generator and engine will be matched for each other to run as efficiently as possible. When you add a load to a generator, pressure-washer or lawn mower the engine 'bogs-down' and then 'tries' to revert to normal, they never speed-up under a sudden load. Like the bloke with a 1300 Golf trying to compete with a stock Ferrari, you will spend more time adjusting than you will running.

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    Quote Originally Posted by acme thread View Post
    Just because you have a Duramax /Allison 3500, Doesn't mean you have a gear in your transmission for a PTO. My 2013 Dura/Allison WORK TRUCK shows a optional PTO on my bill of sale, Pull the cover plate on the trans, and make sure there's a corresponding gear in there; The PTO drive assembly that bolts to the trans. case is quite expensive also. Dave [acme thread]
    A dealer could probably tell by your Vin.# If it has the option.
    Most of the transmission ptos are for aux. power only. Usually this means a small air compressor or hydraulic pump.

    You are asking to to run 75hp in a continuous duty application from a light duty (at best) power source. I have not seen an aux. pto housing that is even close to being adequate for transferring 75hp.

    Another big thing that has not been mentioned yet is what are you going to do for auxiliary cooling of the engine? The factory radiator will not be up to it.

    To put what you are attempting to do in perspective, transportation buses which have a refrigeration load of about 75hp, use a Vee drive transmission. This allows the refrigeration compressor to be powered directly. The refrigeration drive portion of the Vee drive is almost as large as the traction transmission. The buses also have a radiator and fan designed for full load cooling at a zero speed situation.

    Your existing truck has none of this. To do this, I see you spending a lot of money for a poor compromise in application performance. You will likely end up with a truck that will no longer be a good reliable daily driver nor a good steam cleaner service truck.

    It sounds to me that what you need is a steam cleaner that uses diesel fuel for the heat source instead of electric heating elements and a medium sized generator for the rest of the power requirements. This could then be doable. Any more than 20kva is going to be very problematic.

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    Guessing y'all niggas just have me on ignore, yes?
    Not that I fucking care.

    OP, it sounds like you should build a treadmill/dyno setup to drive the generator setup. Pull the truck up on it, and BOOM!!! Or, well, and I know this is weird, but...... buy a fucking generator. There, I said it. Someone had to.


    We now continue to whatever the fuck you clowns do on the regular.

    {I do not give hugs, nor do I give ice cream. I could give (less than) two fucking shits about your piss ant problems.}
    Here's where I should insert a pic of your wife, but who the fuck wants to see that?

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    Best would be to make the whole set-up in an enclosed trailer
    with the aforementioned genset.

    That way, when you trash your beloved 2013 duramax on a
    "dune thrashing" weekend, you can still go to work on monday
    by hitching the trailer to a rental "anything with a hitch".

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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsrider845 View Post
    Guessing y'all niggas just have me on ignore, yes?
    Not that I fucking care.

    OP, it sounds like you should build a treadmill/dyno setup to drive the generator setup. Pull the truck up on it, and BOOM!!! Or, well, and I know this is weird, but...... buy a fucking generator. There, I said it. Someone had to.


    We now continue to whatever the fuck you clowns do on the regular.

    {I do not give hugs, nor do I give ice cream. I could give (less than) two fucking shits about your piss ant problems.}
    Here's where I should insert a pic of your wife, but who the fuck wants to see that?
    Crack is a hell of a drug

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    Quote Originally Posted by acme thread View Post
    Just because you have a Duramax /Allison 3500, Doesn't mean you have a gear in your transmission for a PTO. My 2013 Dura/Allison WORK TRUCK shows a optional PTO on my bill of sale, Pull the cover plate on the trans, and make sure there's a corresponding gear in there; The PTO drive assembly that bolts to the trans. case is quite expensive also. Dave [acme thread]
    A dealer could probably tell by your Vin.# If it has the option.
    I don't have the PTO option, since my truck is a 2500HD. I was thinking that since G.M. offered PTO as an option on the 3500 Allison Duramax cab/chassis trucks, the same attachment should bolt up to the Allison on a 2500HD?

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Crack is a hell of a drug
    I'm Rick James, bitch !

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ziggy2 View Post
    Most of the transmission ptos are for aux. power only. Usually this means a small air compressor or hydraulic pump.

    You are asking to to run 75hp in a continuous duty application from a light duty (at best) power source. I have not seen an aux. pto housing that is even close to being adequate for transferring 75hp.

    Another big thing that has not been mentioned yet is what are you going to do for auxiliary cooling of the engine? The factory radiator will not be up to it.

    To put what you are attempting to do in perspective, transportation buses which have a refrigeration load of about 75hp, use a Vee drive transmission. This allows the refrigeration compressor to be powered directly. The refrigeration drive portion of the Vee drive is almost as large as the traction transmission. The buses also have a radiator and fan designed for full load cooling at a zero speed situation.

    Your existing truck has none of this. To do this, I see you spending a lot of money for a poor compromise in application performance. You will likely end up with a truck that will no longer be a good reliable daily driver nor a good steam cleaner service truck.

    It sounds to me that what you need is a steam cleaner that uses diesel fuel for the heat source instead of electric heating elements and a medium sized generator for the rest of the power requirements. This could then be doable. Any more than 20kva is going to be very problematic.
    I do have a steam cleaner that uses a small diesel engine to power the pump and diesel to heat the water. When I made the thread I didn't know it would be soo much more hassle to power the electric steam cleaners. So it looks like I would just use the diesel steamer for the prospective future business idea. The electric does have the benefit of being able to be located inside buildings.

    Leaving aside the steam cleaners, what kind of equipment can I run of an engine driven PTO ? Is it nothing special to find 1 ton Chevys/Ford/Ram work trucks running equipment under 20KW off the PTO?

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    In commercial trucks there are myriad uses for the PTO. A hydraulic pump is the most common. Tanker trucks often have specialized pumps for whatever substance they haul. Bulk tankers often use high volume blowers or vacuum pumps.

    It's less common now that we do things with hydraulics, but in the old days trucks would have winches, compressors, mechanical hoists, etc running from the PTO.

    One thing I would worry about with a PTO on an automatic is heat in the torque converter. I don't know if the transmission locks the converter during PTO operation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    I would never say you can't do something, because that's like asking for people to prove you wrong, but ...

    Generator diesels and vehicle diesels use different governors. The generator needs to run at a fixed rpm to produce a certain frequency. Usually that's 1200 or 1800 rpm for 60 hz.

    In a vehicle, you'd like to be able to change speeds

    The generator you are talking about would normally be about the size of a 4-71. That's not a small piece of equipment.

    This idea seems like way more trouble than it is worth ...
    Occasionally I have been following used gensets (at auctions) for a few years now. Lots of 60kw and 75kw gensets powered by just a 4 cylinder 3.9L or 4.4L diesel engine. So I pondered the feasibility of using a PTO driven off the Duramax as its power output is way more than the 4 cylinder diesels linked below.

    The below Cat genset has a max rating of 100ekw and uses a 4.4L 4 cylinder diesel.
    Cat | C4.4 Generator Set | 36kW - 100kW Generator | Caterpillar

    The below Onan uses a 3.9L Cummins , is rated 50KW
    50 kw Cummins / Onan Diesel Generator / Genset - 3.9L - 570 Hours - Load Tested | eBay

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    Spud, I owned a 2004 Duramax/Allison,and wanted to put a winch on it,Took it to Custom Clutch in Cleveland for an estimate. When they pulled the rectangular plate on the transmission,They showed me NO gear inside,I guess it's a cost saving thing. My 2013 3500 Duramax/Allison was ordered with the optional PTO option. I don't know if the gear can be installed in an existing Allison,But the Tranny would have to come apart. Dave [acme thread]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Occasionally I have been following used gensets (at auctions) for a few years now. Lots of 60kw and 75kw gensets powered by just a 4 cylinder 3.9L or 4.4L diesel engine. So I pondered the feasibility of using a PTO driven off the Duramax as its power output is way more than the 4 cylinder diesels linked below.

    The below Cat genset has a max rating of 100ekw and uses a 4.4L 4 cylinder diesel.
    Cat | C4.4 Generator Set | 36kW - 100kW Generator | Caterpillar

    The below Onan uses a 3.9L Cummins , is rated 50KW
    50 kw Cummins / Onan Diesel Generator / Genset - 3.9L - 570 Hours - Load Tested | eBay
    Yes, that is the size generator you need. No, you cannot pull the gen end off one of those and drive it thru a PTO. Here is a way to make it work, you get the gen head, mount it on front bumper with shaft closely aligned with crank pulley. You will need a custom radiator and intercooler with a hole in them for a driveshaft. A good hydraulic clutch on gen head, and connect driveshaft to crank pulley. Figure out some way to hold engine at 1800 rpm, maybe some new front suspension, and voilla your in business.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Occasionally I have been following used gensets (at auctions) for a few years now. Lots of 60kw and 75kw gensets powered by just a 4 cylinder 3.9L or 4.4L diesel engine. So I pondered the feasibility of using a PTO driven off the Duramax as its power output is way more than the 4 cylinder diesels linked below.

    The below Cat genset has a max rating of 100ekw and uses a 4.4L 4 cylinder diesel.
    Cat | C4.4 Generator Set | 36kW - 100kW Generator | Caterpillar

    The below Onan uses a 3.9L Cummins , is rated 50KW
    50 kw Cummins / Onan Diesel Generator / Genset - 3.9L - 570 Hours - Load Tested | eBay
    The duramax doesn't have "way more power" than those. For a general idea (w/o looking up specs) just look at displacement. Your duramax is a 6.6L, and those are 4.4L & 3.9L (the 3.9L isn't large enough to power your loads). That right there should give you an idea that to power what you want, you're pushing your Duramax up against the upper end of it's power capacity. Except it's not made to run there continuously like a generator is. The support systems, as already mentioned, are not designed to sustain near max HP for continuous operation. Even on the longest, nastiest hill-climb in the country, towing the max-rated payload of the truck, you would only be pushing the engine to that extreme for 15 minutes or maybe 30 minutes. What typically comes after a long hill-climb? A descend where the engine then gets a chance to cool back down.

    What you're proposing is certainly possible (running a generator off of your truck engine) but it simply isn't as simple as you think it is. Things I can think of that you'll need for certain in order to do it:
    #1 Oversize radiator, larger fans, and aux cooling (probably ~$1500 cost)
    #2 A specialized governor that will permit you to lock in the engine RPM you need to maintain frequency of the generator, and then still permit normal driving when you want to drive it. (If this exists I'm guessing $1000 cost)
    #3 75kw gen-head ($5k on the cheap end)
    #4 A means of direct coupling the engine to the generator that allows easy switch-over back to driving Special gear-box? I don't know the solutions but you can expect the cost to be inversely proportional to the convenience. You have to decide if you want to connect that before the transmission or after. If after there are additional things needed. Cost of such a beast to go before the trans, I'm guessing $15k. After the transmission gives more options, including the aforementioned disconnect the driveshaft and connect it to the generator every time you want to run it. Costs: $1k-10k
    #5 If you're powering through the trans then you need oversized trans-cooler and additional fans, as well as you may as well budget for more frequent trans rebuilds now. Cost: $8k

    So by my estimates, sure, what you want to do is possible, you're looking at $17k-25k costs to do so. You're going to have a LOT of research to do, and quite a bit of engineering to have a lot of custom-made solutions developed to do this.

    IMHO, it all seems silly when used industrial generators can be had on the cheap if you're patient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CountryBoy19 View Post
    What you're proposing is certainly possible ...
    Okay, if we're gonna play Rube Goldberg ...

    Mount the generator head on a flatbed. Cut a slot in the bed. Put a toothed belt pulley on the drive shaft. Put a pair of air-powered jack stands by the rear wheels. Maybe some sort of clutch on the genny end, or you could just use it as a giant alternator when driving if you want.

    Now, when you want to use the genny, pop the rear end up in the air on the jack stands, run up the genny to the correct rpm, set the cruise control, and away ya go.

    There's probaly other methods even wackier

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Okay, if we're gonna play Rube Goldberg ...

    Mount the generator head on a flatbed. Cut a slot in the bed. Put a toothed belt pulley on the drive shaft. Put a pair of air-powered jack stands by the rear wheels. Maybe some sort of clutch on the genny end, or you could just use it as a giant alternator when driving if you want.

    Now, when you want to use the genny, pop the rear end up in the air on the jack stands, run up the genny to the correct rpm, set the cruise control, and away ya go.

    There's probaly other methods even wackier
    Even better, put the generator in place of the transmission, and attach a motor to the differential.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strostkovy View Post
    Even better, put the generator in place of the transmission, and attach a motor to the differential.
    Someone is going to come out with that some day. It would make a heck of a good utility truck. Mount an air compressor inline with the engine as well. Now you got everything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Okay, if we're gonna play Rube Goldberg ...
    Rube Goldberg made thing intentionally ore difficult for tne engineering challenge/marvel. My post isn't Rube Goldberg at all, it's just the reality of what the OP is asking for. It's not a simple/cheap matter like he originally thought. I think he just didn't realize the power needed, which IMHO comes from a lack of understanding of electrical power. Many trucks can be had with heavy-duty alternators providing 200+ amps. Some hear that and think, "Wow, 200 amps, my house is on a 200 amp service so my alternator must be able to supply enough power to run a house." Which isn't true at all because the voltage component of the power equation. That failure of logic would lead one to believe they just gotta drop an oversize alternator in and bam, 50kw output (200 amp @ 240V is 48kw). I was simply pointing out that it's not as easy as dropping an alternator in (as other previously stated and the OP didn't seem to understand).
    Quote Originally Posted by Strostkovy View Post
    Even better, put the generator in place of the transmission, and attach a motor to the differential.
    That, IMHO, is the only proper way to do this if OP has to use the primary engine as the power source. Make a giant "hybrid" truck. There is absolutely no reason it won't work but you're still talking about massive expense. Motors, generators, controls, all get pricey...

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    I don't understand your dislike of putting the necessary equipment on a trailer.

    Your comment about being a student makes me think you are a young fellow. No matter how much you have your heart set on a certain path, life has a funny way of changing your situation. As a song says "If you want to hear God laugh, tell him your plans".

    The point to that paragraph is you need to remain flexible. If you buy discrete units and combine them into your system you have an exit strategy. I would expect you to be able to resell used standard equipment for 50%-75% of your purchase price. Trailer, generator unit, or steam cleaner. Plus, individual components can be upgraded as necessare.

    If you go to all the work of integrating a generator into a pickup, chances are great the only buyer will be a junk dealer. Not only will your pickup have lost most of its value, so will the generator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Crack is a hell of a drug
    Quit that shit after 11 years. I just huff the fumes of "humanity" now. Get's you higher than laughing gas, and you don't hide in a corner like crack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CountryBoy19 View Post
    That, IMHO, is the only proper way to do this if OP has to use the primary engine as the power source. Make a giant "hybrid" truck. There is absolutely no reason it won't work but you're still talking about massive expense. Motors, generators, controls, all get pricey...
    The obvious solution would be a series wound universal motor because they behave a lot like a regular motor on a CVT. Then just use SCRs to control it. Actually not too difficult.

    The fun way is to use a slip ring synchronous motor where the stator can be configured as two pole or four pole and the rotor can be six or twelve pole. Allowing DC injection to lock up one field allows for 600, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3000, 3600, 4200, 4800 and 5400 RPM at engine 1800 RPM. If you used a 24 pole rotor configured between 6 and 8 poles you could nearly double the amount of "gears".

    I imagine a hilariously complicated drum switch that constantly reconfigures 54 motor leads used to shift.

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