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  1. #21
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    I don't know if anyone mentioned it, but you should always use stranded wire for anything the can vibrate like a machine tool. Solid wire is much more likely to break or crack from vibration.

    This is also why you should avoid soldering terminals where possible. A good crimp is plenty strong, and excellent conductor, and less likely to get brittle and crack than a solder.

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  3. #22
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    I like to strip the wire and solder the strands of wire before crimping.
    That machine tool isn't going to vibrate. Heck, on my lathe I can stand a dime on end while it is running.

  4. #23
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    Make no mistake, I take no offense to any of the input provided- I appreciate it. I will tidy up the wiring sooner or later. The good news is that there is no issues with interference currently, it works as designed. I will tidy up the boxes to make it look better and perhaps help with any interference that could exist.

    The 10conductor cable is numbered and the numbers correspond with their locations on the VFD. I will likely add labels to the DIN terminals in the future.

    It's kind of annoying that TECO put the output terminals directly next to the digital terminals (on the bottom of hte VFD) but I'm sure I can work with it. Here's the major reason why I have a spaghetti mess right now: I am scared of cutting the wires short because I just hooked up the machine and it's not fully proofed out just yet. I want to make sure I have some wiggle room in case I need to change something. After a month or so of using the machine and making no changes, I'll up the pride-factor up a bit and route the wiring.

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneMachines View Post
    Where did you get the enclosure for the operator controls? How did you make/print the control markings on the front? The multi-coloured control blocks, are they just dumb terminals ?

    Thanks.
    The box is a hoffman enclosure off of ebay.

    I machined the panel from acrylic and back painted it using my CNC.

    The terminals are standard DIN terminals that I bought from McMaster.

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by xplodee View Post
    Make no mistake, I take no offense to any of the input provided- I appreciate it.
    You did get something wrong. In the field green indicates "stopped" and red indicates "running".
    You could fix it by using a bi-color led (red/green) and adapt the exisitng lamp socket.

    Or use push buttons with integral lamps.

    The Cutler-Hammer way

    dsc_0699.jpg

    The Allen Bradley way

    dsc_0700.jpg

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by xplodee View Post

    Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr
    Got a better way to do this.(no offense)

    Put the green lamp underneath the start button.

    Put a red lamp underneath the stop button.

    Relocate the speed pot to where the green lamp was.

    The Fwd.Rev switch is not very useful. You can find another
    way to get into reverse on those rare occasions.Like when
    turning a left-hand thread with the cutter upside down.

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    Got a better way to do this.(no offense)
    Cool! Lets see it. Im always eager to hear better ways.

  10. #28
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    I have only done this a couple of times before

    dsc_0702.jpg

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  12. #29
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    Nice. I modeled mine after my hardinge HLV-H: The green is the power indicator only.

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    xplodee,
    Have you ever seen those lamp stacks usually used at CNC stations.

    Commonly used colour codes for machine state conditions include:

    RED: Failure conditions such as an emergency stop or machine fault
    YELLOW: Warnings such as over-temperature or over-pressure conditions
    GREEN: Normal machine or process operation
    BLUE: External help request, where an operator might be requesting raw materials, scheduling or maintenance personnel assistance
    WHITE: User-defined conditions specific to a machine, often related to productivity monitoring
    Optionally an audible alarm buzzer, typically in the range of 70–105dB, may be added to alert machine operators to high priority conditions.

    I guess green is ok, but I think changing the green lens to clear and using a reg/green high output led is a good idea.

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by xplodee View Post

    Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr

    Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr
    Just finished a project using the same box. I went a little farther.

    Picture 1:
    I removed the two flat mounting plates from the back.

    Picture 2:
    I filed off the curled lip on the two edges of the door that are not used. On another project I ground off all three edges and installed a door lock. The picture shows that the curled edges are still there. They were ground off after the picture was taken.

    dsc_0027.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by xplodee View Post
    I machined the panel from acrylic and back painted it using my CNC.
    As a relative newbie, I'd love to see this process written up. I assume I'm reading this incorrectly "and back painted it using my CNC". You painted via CNC? I'm aware of CNC painting on large scale applications. (Robotic painting) Just curious if my inference is correct. If so, yeah, to me, that would be a cool write up.
    Great job, looks amazing. I'm jealous of the overall smoothness of the paint on the lathe. Body filler?

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    Very nice! Now make the wiring on the inside look as good as the outside!
    Last edited by Yan Wo; 07-22-2019 at 09:44 PM.

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  18. #34
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    With some good planning and some elbow grease you can make your wiring job look 'almost' professional...just like this.

    Stuart

    grizzenclosure.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by xplodee View Post

    Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr
    I would choose outside looks versus inside looks. But a DIN rail is already in the box. I would use a DIN rail wire to ribbon cable module. The ribbon cable would lie across the door hinge and connect to the same module. Something like:

    din rail wire to ribbon - Google Search

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I would choose outside looks versus inside looks. But a DIN rail is already in the box. I would use a DIN rail wire to ribbon cable module. The ribbon cable would lie across the door hinge and connect to the same module. Something like:

    din rail wire to ribbon - Google Search
    Interesting. Is ribbon cable internally shielded? Or, does one run power separately from the ribbon?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    Interesting. Is ribbon cable internally shielded? Or, does one run power separately from the ribbon?
    Depends. Inter-conductor grounds are common."Standard", even. Foil and mesh overlays also exist.

    Made sense for rackups of SCSI drives back when parallel was king.

    Foolish overkill for a ONE-OFF as is the case, here. Even the connectors run the cost off the map, nor are proper tools to reliably make them up exactly "free". DAMHIKT.

    Few cents worth of tie-wraps - because tape makes a mess, given time - DONE, and time to move-on to something more useful as is being ignored whilst this critter is being over-thunk to an OCD death to make a functional box "prettier".

    Then again... some folk would presume to re-engineer a healthy vagina - or try to replicate one from a warm start outta the parts-bin - 'stead of counting their blessings and runnin' what they got.

    Go figure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Made sense for rackups of SCSI drives back when parallel was king.
    Face palm, duh moment!! Circa 1998 I was chaining skuzzi drives as a LAN Admin for a small business. Never thought I'd see that world coalesce with this world. I appreciate the "AHA" moment. I KNEW I should have kept all that stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    Face palm, duh moment!! Circa 1998 I was chaining skuzzi drives as a LAN Admin for a small business. Never thought I'd see that world coalesce with this world. I appreciate the "AHA" moment. I KNEW I should have kept all that stuff.
    Mebbe I was wiser? I got RID of whole rolls of it - then SATA as well.

    Heavy-hitters - telco switches - were already running fibre within their guts by the dawn of the 1990's.

    Running solid-state "drives" now, with the odd USB3 and Blunderturd.

    Time moves-on... those are soon to go obsolescent, too.

    Meanwhile.. if/as/when a box cover even has to BE opened regularly? As this one may never?

    All one has EVER had to do is route a bundle of standard stranded wire across the length of the hinge-point and back.

    The twist is distributed very gently across the length between the bends, and it lives a VERY long time, given how much SHORTER the life of the system is than the wire before it is obsolete.

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  26. #40
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    Dang... Thermite has it right!

    The standard good way is to tie the wires in a bundle along the hinge. And to restrain them at the ends so that the twist does not put any force on the connections. They last essentially as long as your interest in that device does, when set up that way.

    ONE traverse of the hinge is good, but down and back is the real deal, and takes just about all the strain and "wear" off the wiring.

    Another pro-tip is to make the box hinge DOWN when possible, if it cannot hinge sideways. When hinged down, it cannot decide to flop down on you. Disadvantage is it is lower down, your choice.

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