Using an Existing 220 for Another Machine.
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  1. #1
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    Default Using an Existing 220 for Another Machine.

    In order to run my a phase converter for my mill, I need 220. My breaker box is completely full, so I can't get 220 that way. My kitchen is near my garage, and my oven/range Runs on a 220 volt 50 amp receptacle. The stove part of the range runs on gas, and the oven isn't used too often, so I wanted to use that receptacle for my mill. However, the range is essentially built into the countertop, so I can't just unplug and plug when I need to use the mill. There is space on the other side of the wall for a second receptacle. Is it possible to tap into the 220 to create a second 220? Of course, only one appliance/machine run at a time. would it just be a matter of putting in a second receptacle, or would I need some switch to turn one receptacle off at a time?
    I am under the impression 50 amps is too much for the mill, so how could I go about making the receptacle a lower amperage too? I don't know if this is possible or allowed, so are there any other recommendations if this doesn't work?

    Thanks,
    Matthew

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    Yes you could do it, but it most likely is not up to code, and should something happen (ie FIRE!) if insurance inspector finds it, they will not pay.

    What amperage circuit feeds the shop? Maybe its time to upgrade service with a bigger box, or maybe get some compact breakers so you can get more circuits in existing box.

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    As I've mentioned in other threads breakers and fuses are intended to protect wiring! Not the item it's connected to. If you tap into the line you need to run the same size wire that should be #6 to your machine! You can buy boxes with a single breaker possibly 2 if the combined load does not exceed the wire feeding the garage panel which will blow the fuse/breaker it's connected to. You can add the additional panel anywhere as long as the wire feeding it is equal to what it being tapped into. Keeping in mind Fuse/Breaker is intended to protect the wire!

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    Mathew

    You could use the 220 volt 50 amp circuit for the range to feed a sub-panel "on the other side of the wall".

    Disconnect the range from that feeder wire. From that sub panel you could add breakers to feed the range receptacle or j-box (whichever you have). If the cook top is separate from the oven, you could also add a 120 volt 15 or 20 amp circuit/receptacle to feed the gas cook top. Then you could use the sub panel to also feed a 220 volt circuit for your mill.

    Check the power requirements on your range to size its breaker correctly in the sub-panel. 50 amps might be more than is required.

    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisw View Post
    Mathew

    You could use the 220 volt 50 amp circuit for the range to feed a sub-panel "on the other side of the wall".

    Disconnect the range from that feeder wire. From that sub panel you could add breakers to feed the range receptacle or j-box (whichever you have). If the cook top is separate from the oven, you could also add a 120 volt 15 or 20 amp circuit/receptacle to feed the gas cook top. Then you could use the sub panel to also feed a 220 volt circuit for your mill.

    Check the power requirements on your range to size its breaker correctly in the sub-panel. 50 amps might be more than is required.

    Chris
    Again the breaker is to protect the wire. A range don't have a 50 Amp rated plug for no reason. The range total amps include all the burners on and the oven or broiler on too, Plus any lights and outlets. However it's the wire that the breaker protects. If you don't protect the wire you have the risk of fire! A sub panel is fine, I recommended that you do it but keep in mind it's the wire your protecting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Froneck View Post
    Again the breaker is to protect the wire. A range don't have a 50 Amp rated plug for no reason. The range total amps include all the burners on and the oven or broiler on too, Plus any lights and outlets. However it's the wire that the breaker protects. If you don't protect the wire you have the risk of fire! A sub panel is fine, I recommended that you do it but keep in mind it's the wire your protecting!
    Yes...I agree with what you say, but in this case the burners are gas, not electric. I would venture to think that the oven would get by with maybe only a 40 amp circuit. And yes, size the breakers and wire correctly. That's a given.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisw View Post
    Yes...I agree with what you say, but in this case the burners are gas, not electric. I would venture to think that the oven would get by with maybe only a 40 amp circuit. And yes, size the breakers and wire correctly. That's a given.
    They are wired correctly yes I assumed that. What I'm saying if you want to connect to your 50Amp breaker you will need #6 wire not #12. Breaker protects the wire!!! Wire overload will get hot and cause fire. You can add a single breaker box near your 50Amp in the box which I assume has no unused openings, use a 20Amp breaker/fuse and #12 wire. Or if there is a junction box in the stove wire mount the single breaker/fuse box there. Or cut the stove cable rewire it thru the single breaker/fuse and tap it to connect the 20Amp breaker/fuse and continue to your machine with #12. Simply put taping the 50Amp protected oven #6 wire with any wire size below #6 is not correct unless protection for the smaller wire is provided. However if you do want to run #6 wire to your 15/20Amp motor that's OK, kinda expensive but that's your decision to make.


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