very old motor wiring
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  1. #1
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    Default very old motor wiring

    Hello All,
    I know this has been posted before, but this is a different motor, so I wanted to keep the replies separate, hence the new posting.

    I have a very old motor, and I believe from internet sleuthing (dslreports user drjim | DSLReports, ISP Information), a Repulsion start induction
    Single phase.

    There is no wiring diagram on this, but the badge says, Hendricks Magneto and Eelectric Co, Indianapolis, IN. From other posts and videos, I think this is probably about a hundred years old.

    Type: D20
    Volts: 40
    Amp: 20
    KW: 0.8
    RPM 1800.

    It has two massive brushes, no capacitor, and no wiring diagram, and the terminals aren't numbered in any way, so I'm just referring to the left to right. I bought it at a farm auction, and it had a single insulated wire (pictured) connected to one of the four terminals pictured here (the terminal on the right side). There was no plug on this wire--I'm not sure if this is 110V or 220V. For the four terminals, the first (large) is connected to the second (smaller) with a copper plate. The larger terminals (the first and fourth) are connected to the two brushes, and the smaller terminals go to the coil on the inside of the motor housing.

    I've pulled the rotor to clean it, and have one wire on the arbor end of the motor (away from the brushes) to re-insulate. I'm in the process of cleaning and re-packing the bearings, scrubbing the dirt off of the rotor, squirrel cage, and stator.

    My big question for you all is how to wire this up. I have a multi-meter, but am a complete novice at using it. I'm somewhat comfortable running a 12-3 wire to a switch and then to the motor, but that's about it. If possible, I'm looking for very clear instructions on what poles to connect to the black and white wires coming off of a switch, and if any poles should be tied together. I'll ground the motor directly to the frame.

    img-1685.jpgimg-1687.jpgimg-1693.jpgimg-1694.jpgimg-1690.jpg

  2. #2
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    [QUOTE=jordanirvin;3434023]--I'm not sure if this is 110V or 220V.

    Neither? This seems to be a 40 volt dc motor. I cannot tell if there is a centrifugal brush lifting mechanism
    but I suspect not. This means it is not repulsion start, induction run.

  3. #3
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    Yep, it just about has to be a standard shunt-wound DC motor (or generator).

    With 4 terminals, two for field, two for armature, which are the ones going to the brushes. The shorting bar would be standard when the supply voltage is used as-is for field.

    DC motors of this type will also generate, if they are spun, and have some remanent magnetic field in the iron. the field generates a bit, which produces field current, and so more magnetic field and so forth.. That feedback "builds up" to some volts/rpm value. It may well produce 40V if spun at 1800 RPM. The difference between a generator and a motor is not that much.

  4. #4
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    That's a very interesting piece of equipment you have there. A quick Internet search of the Indiana company reveals they were a manufacturer of Farm-Lighting generators.

    The attached screen shot from a magazine news release indicates your unit could be either shunt or compound wound.
    So it appears you have a nice little 40 volt generator.

    As mentioned, it could also be powered as a motor... but it's not likely a very efficient connected as a motor.

    John
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails farm-generator.jpg  

  5. #5
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    About seventy years ago when I was but 9, we stopped at some West Texas park facility that had 32v light bulbs in its lighting system

  6. #6
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    Guessing this is 40 volt so it can charge a bank of 32 volt lead acid batteries.


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