3 Million dollar grant for cleaning up The Warner & Swasey Co. plant
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    Default 3 Million dollar grant for cleaning up The Warner & Swasey Co. plant

    The Plain Dealer – Business C1 – September 11, 2011



    Northeast Ohio

    “Cleveland awarded $3 million grant for cleanup”



    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded a $3 million grant to the city of Cleveland for the environmental cleanup at the Warner & Swasey complex on Carnegie Avenue. Hemingway Development, Streetsboro, Ohio, hopes to restore the buildings with offices, labs, and warehouse space in the city’s Health-Tech Corridor.







    The Plain Dealer – Business – May 27, 2010



    “Cleveland's abandoned Warner & Swasey complex could become a tech center”
    By: Michelle Jarboe [email protected]

    COURTESY OF THE GEIS COS. Hemingway Development hopes to revive the former Warner & Swasey Co. complex at East 55th Street and Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland. This image shows a restored version of the main building, which is dilapidated, with boarded-up and bricked-over windows. The city of Cleveland owns the property, a former machine-tool shop that has been vacant since 1985.
    CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A local developer could revive the former Warner & Swasey Co. facility, a dilapidated and boarded-up complex that looms over East 55th Street and Carnegie Avenue.

    The city of Cleveland, which owns the property, is working on a deal with Hemingway Development and HzW Environmental Consultants LLC. Hemingway, a division of the Geis Cos. of Streetsboro, wants to restore the 130-year-old buildings for offices, labs and warehousing or manufacturing space -- uses that fit with an effort to brand and promote the Midtown area of Cleveland as a health and technology corridor.

    The city's economic development department plans to apply for up to $3 million through the Clean Ohio Fund, a state program that provides grants for environmental assessments, demolition and cleanup on potentially contaminated land. Cleveland's City Council could vote early next month to make way for the Clean Ohio application and a development agreement and purchase option with Hemingway.

    The Warner & Swasey buildings, at 5701 Carnegie Ave., have been vacant since 1985. They housed a machine-tool shop, where thousands of Warner & Swasey Co. workers made lathes used to produce tanks, guns, ships and airplanes during World War II. The workers also built telescopes, a passion of company co-founder Worcester Warner.

    Cleveland acquired the property in 1991. The windows are covered with bricks and boards, and the buildings are a favorite haunt of urban explorers who sneak in to document the decay.

    "It's terrible," said Fred Geis, a principal with Hemingway. "The roof is gone, the copper's been stolen, people broke out all the windows and stole all the aluminum. Anything that's not attached to the concrete has been stolen."

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    COURTESY OF THE GEIS COS. The complex housed the Warner & Swasey Co., a manufacturer of machine tools. During World War II, the company employed 7,000 people making lathes used to produce tanks, guns, ships and airplanes. The workers also built telescopes.



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    By the end of this year, Hemingway and HzW, an environmental consultant in Mentor, hope to study the property, collect soil and water samples and determine how much cleaning is necessary. The cleanup could take 18 to 24 months, and Hemingway hopes to reopen most of the building within three years.

    Without knowing the cleaning costs, it's impossible to estimate the cost of a redevelopment. Hemingway hopes to create 180,000 square feet for offices, labs and warehouses or manufacturing -- space Geis would like to lease at low rates, of less than $8 to $10 per square foot. The project also would include parking in an area now occupied by a building with a saw-toothed roof.

    Hemingway's designs complement plans for the Cleveland Health-Tech Corridor, a business- and real estate-development effort being shepherded by Mid-Town Cleveland Inc. and BioEnterprise Inc., a University Circle nonprofit that cultivates biomedical companies. Corridor partners aim to nurture new businesses, relocate suppliers for institutions including the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals, fill vacant buildings and assemble property for redevelopment.

    "Right now in Cleveland we have seven incubators, the most recent being the Global Cardiovascular Innovation Center, and when that opened it was 75 percent occupied," said Tracey Nichols, the city's economic development director. "We have very little space available. So we are looking for more properties that are ready to go, especially where companies need an entire building and not just a piece of the building."

    The city would sell the Warner & Swasey property to Hemingway for $1 and would put $35,000 toward the environmental survey and plan. Cleveland would not provide additional money or tax abatement. If Hemingway does not complete the project within three years of buying the facility, the city would take the property back.

    Geis, his brother Greg and the Coyne family also hope to build a technology center at Euclid Avenue and East 69th Street, in the heart of the Cleveland Health-Tech Corridor. The partners shared updated drawings of that project with city design officials last week. The Euclid Tech Center would target biotechnology and health care companies.





    Source: Bill McNamara. Chapter 2, The Warner & Swasey Company – “The Gradall A Story of American Ingenuity” ca 1958



    Jim Grant, September 18, 2011

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    They better run a geiger counter over the place before committing.

    I have an article from "machinery" back in the early 1950's showing
    how W&S had used radiactive carbide to test tooling life.

    My Hazmat friend looked at the pix, and the descriptions of the "pre-cautions"
    that W&S used, commented that it was woefully in-adequate.

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    Default Still going

    Well, I spent four years at the plant as a apprentice and have also had my body cell count change at a nuke plant, but at 69+ I am still going strong and sometimes paly a mean game of golf.

    TPR

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    That plant has been closed for about as long as about a third of all americans have been alive.
    Vacant since 85. Thats amazing.
    Out here on the West Coast, most building like that are gone in six months, and a new shopping mall or condo complex is built in a year.

    I am also amazed they can do much more than sweep the driveway for $3 million.

    Unless they are just flydumping the debris on some other abandoned factory grounds.

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    Of course, NOTHING the new owners do will be machine tool or manufacturing related...

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    No, because the NEW machine tool factories are all getting built in California.

    Haas is now up to 1 Million square feet in Oxnard- (The largest in the USA) -even thought the taxes, real estate prices, and wages are all much higher than they are in Cleveland.

    Mori is building their new 200,000 sq ft , $50 Million factory in Davis, outside of Sacramento.
    http://www.dmgmoriseikiusa.com/msm

    The water jet cutting industry, which was invented in the USA, and is a huge machine tool industry that is dominated by american companies, is in Seattle.

    Why, exactly, this is, is open to debate, but new investment in machine tool factories seems to be in areas far from the old rust belt.

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    Are there pics, new or old, inside or out, online anywhere? I have never seen the place and wouldn't mind seeing plant regardless of condition.

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    Here are some pictures, you have to wonder what it looked like in its prime!

    Great Lakes Urban-Ex | Cleveland, Ohio - Urban Exploration

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    During 1980 I was working for a shop that had used W&S machines since their founding. It was recognized that the time had come for the CNC technology to be added to the mix of W&S turret lathes, bar machines and chuckers and $400K had been allocated to the change. After extensive discussions with W&S sales a meeting was scheduled where I intended to close the deal.

    We flew to Cleveland and called from the airport expecting they would send somebody to pick us up. The reply was, "We don't do that - if you can afford to buy one of our machines you should be able to afford cab fare... click".

    It got worse. We had explained how important to us that W&S was an American company with production in the US and no connections to Japan - were the boss had had some unfortunate experiences during WW2. At no time during the discussion did they bother to tell us that was exactly where the quoted machines would be built. We found out only when one of us spotted a newspaper clipping during the plant tour.

    That was the end of my employers long association with W&S. I am sorry they are gone but certainly no surprise.

    johnhb

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    No, because the NEW machine tool factories are all getting built in California.

    Haas is now up to 1 Million square feet in Oxnard- (The largest in the USA) -even thought the taxes, real estate prices, and wages are all much higher than they are in Cleveland.

    Mori is building their new 200,000 sq ft , $50 Million factory in Davis, outside of Sacramento.
    Breaking New Ground And Building Opportunity | DMG Mori Seiki

    The water jet cutting industry, which was invented in the USA, and is a huge machine tool industry that is dominated by american companies, is in Seattle.

    Why, exactly, this is, is open to debate, but new investment in machine tool factories seems to be in areas far from the old rust belt.
    I think its because the smart motivated people GTFO of the rust belt and live the rest of their lives enjoying the ocean and sunshine while the idiots trudge through snow and ice, just an idiot from Minnesota's opinion

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    This was after the great white horse purchased W&S, which turned into a BLACK/BAD horse ( BUYER). I can guarantee you that W&S was a first class company and took care of its customers.
    Tom Richardson


    Quote Originally Posted by John Buscher View Post
    During 1980 I was working for a shop that had used W&S machines since their founding. It was recognized that the time had come for the CNC technology to be added to the mix of W&S turret lathes, bar machines and chuckers and $400K had been allocated to the change. After extensive discussions with W&S sales a meeting was scheduled where I intended to close the deal.

    We flew to Cleveland and called from the airport expecting they would send somebody to pick us up. The reply was, "We don't do that - if you can afford to buy one of our machines you should be able to afford cab fare... click".

    It got worse. We had explained how important to us that W&S was an American company with production in the US and no connections to Japan - were the boss had had some unfortunate experiences during WW2. At no time during the discussion did they bother to tell us that was exactly where the quoted machines would be built. We found out only when one of us spotted a newspaper clipping during the plant tour.

    That was the end of my employers long association with W&S. I am sorry they are gone but certainly no surprise.

    johnhb


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