Turret Lathe for Hobby Use? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I have a wade 7 turret lathe, it takes up about the same footprint as a South Bend 9 or 10. Its good for bar stock up to 1" or so though I've not used it much over 3/4". I've found it very helpful for jobs with qty > 1 or 2, particularly when there are several ops. As an only machine it would be kind of clumsy but as a second its quite handy.

    But as others have mentioned you have to have to the tooling, thankfully ebay is a good source for cheap used tools (box tools, die heads, etc) though buyer beware. Basically when tooling the turret you need a few selections of box tools, drill holders etc so you can set up jobs. My Wade's prev owner liked small jacobs chucks and DIY drill collets, which do work well in combination; quite often the drill + chuck combo is too long for the work envelope so twist drills go into a collet that mounts in the turret, center drills in a small jacobs. Reamers also tend to be long, collets are handy for them too. I've added 6 or so different box tools of various mfr's to the mix, and a die head for threading. The lever cross slide is great for parting and form tools, the "0XA" size import aloris clone tooling is a good match. Setting up a job on a turret lathe to run efficiently is much like figuring out a puzzle.

    My most recent jobs thru the Wade were one run each of toggle switch handles and button caps for an old stereo amp.

  2. #22
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    stephen thomas said: "Brian - Is your hobby old steam locomotives and cable excavators, or is it watches?
     
    Richard King said: "I miss using a Turret lathe. They are fun to use."
     
    Hi Fellas,
    I think my hobby is fascination with the idea of using the machines. If I can think up any projects to make, I would like to get a used Lathe and a Miller. Or maybe get one in need of restoration for the purpose of doing only that and then trying to sell it on. But to only have them with no use for them seems a waste of a machine which could have gone to someone who would get some good out of it. So I will hold off on buying until I have some definite projects in mind. (And more money) Meanwhile, I am trying to learn all I can about the machines.

    And as Richard King said: Turret lathes are fun to use.
    I would like to restore that Hartness flat turret that is here on the forum somewhere looking for a good home.

    Brian

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    Some turret lathes have thread gears and so you can put in a tail center and run threads on one-ups and do most anything an engine lathe can run. and still run turret production..

    Others turret lathes with not a thread change (gears or QC) require a die set for every threads so not very good for one-ups.

    example of both worlds:
    Clausing Lathe 15 x 48 - tools - by dealer - sale

    Here a nice Logan example but think it does have thread change.
    Clausing Lathe 15 x 48 - tools - by dealer - sale
    Need a one time use 1 1/2 thread can be very expensive.

    I know way far form Oregon.

    Perhaps make a list of thing you might make or turn and add up the features you may need...

  4. #24
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    Some can thread
    20180327_143456.jpg
    Craigslist 700$ delivered
    Pretty worn out though

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hbjj View Post
    Some can thread
    20180327_143456.jpg
    Craigslist 700$ delivered
    Pretty worn out though
    ow cool is that! Is that a kickout mechanism at the bottom? How does it operate?
    H

  6. #26
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    20180328_092107.jpg
    The bottom rod is the threading controls fwd/neutral/rev
    The lowest handle on right side
    20180328_092231.jpg
    Half nut
    20180328_092254.jpg
    Fwd/neutral/rev cam
    20180328_092251.jpg

    So without a threading dial you leave halfnut closed and run back and forth on the leadscrew there is a moveable stop on the rod to set your end
    Feed straight in but I normally do that anyway
    It doesn't like to thread past 250rpm it bangs pretty hard

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    I worked for a crowd called Crane Brass,and their turret lathes had 1/8" of wear in the beds..and relied entirely on the overhead guide bar for guidance.The multi spindle autos were worn worse.Yet they turned out fancy bathroom fittings.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Albin View Post
     
    Richard King said: "I miss using a Turret lathe. They are fun to use."
    Well... he must never have had to earn his crust at it for a full shift, then.

    "Fun" my aching back. Buggers were NOT "CNC'ed"!

    The rapid cycle time / high parts spit-out involves physical WORK for an operator, and not just small rations OF it. Worse, it is mind-numbing repetitious work to boot.

    One gets sore tired, and Real Soon Now, brain as well as back, just keeping up with a serious turret or capstan lathe.

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    Yeah,thats exactly what i was thinking,too.Especially a big un,turret movements take real effort.Biggest I ever worked was a FORD from WW2,they also had a "Southern Cross",nearly as big.The factory was the site of a WW2 armaments factory,and it seems the machines came with the building.Ten ton plus,I reckon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Yeah,thats exactly what i was thinking,too.Especially a big un,turret movements take real effort.Biggest I ever worked was a FORD from WW2,they also had a "Southern Cross",nearly as big.The factory was the site of a WW2 armaments factory,and it seems the machines came with the building.Ten ton plus,I reckon.
    Oh, everything was power assisted well-enough. One just had to stay in-tune with the orchestra all shift at actuating one thing after another exactly the same way, proper time, over and over, and over, and.....

    FWIW-not-much, I had done much the same on Hardinge, prior Day-Job. Same issue.

    Mindless repetition all-shift just isn't my bag. Grew to hate it.

    Loved the never more than one or few job shop, mining and rail REPAIR, mostly, instead.

    Each item had its own challenges, needed brain work to even choose the proper machine and set it up, next item not the same, etc.

  12. #31
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    "Fun" wrt running a high part count job on a turret lathe is not precisely the word I would use. Just to add to the experience its also generally the case that the turret lathes are located in the hot humid part of the shop (with all the coolant) or the cold as f*@k part where you get wet from the splashing to go with the freezing fingers. As far as a paying job I would rather do most anything other than turret lathe production work, but its a privilege as a volunteer.

    OTOH the turret lathes are a sure win because to do a high part count job on a manual lathe goes thorough the mind-numbing PITA and out the other side into the endless and rarefied realms of madness.

    But the W&S machines are great, sure are a treat to use. I think they're all are pleasant to run when you finally get the smallish job set up, run the parts and clean up, well-aware of how much time and cranking and fiddling and scrap it just saved you compared to running them on the regular lathe.

  13. #32
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    Another thought on having a TL around as a 2nd or 3rd or 4th etc machine is the eventuall possibility of a retro to cnc. Turnkey kits are available now ,one doesnt have to be a mad scientist /electronics genius to cnc a manual lathe. And here is the kicker, a turret lathe , with a long full length TEE slotted crossslide is perfect for a gang tooling setup, as the Haas toolroom lathe uses.
    I have two WS #3's in addition to two manual lathes. Converting my 29X160 victor manual to CNC control, taught me how advantagous that long tee slot would be. I daydream of having a BIG WS, perhaps somthing like a 4A with a 6 or 9" hole.

    Regards
    Dave Lawrence

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    Where I live they still allow (amazingly), people in the big scrap yard in towne, its still $.25 a pound . I try to buy good quantitys when i go so they will see money folowing in from this activity....last week I hauled out 660 pounds, most of that was new structural steel.


    Of course Its a golden opportunity pick up tooling of all kinds. Toward this end I have built several sliding drawyers into my truck toolbox, one needs lots of tools for effective harvesting.

    there is a constant parade of old WS lathes right now there is a 2A wlth 4" spindle hole there , I just keep going back to look at..

    There is a nice monarch tailstock there now, I am going back and measure it more carefully, am considering putting it on my squair head WS #3 .

    I just love the way the WS lathes are built.....

  15. #34
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    I'm with thermite on this one! Just looking at the pics of those old W&S makes my left arm/shoulder ache thinking of that collet clamping lever pulled over, and over and over...
    Yeah, put one in production and the romance will wear off before your first break.

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  17. #35
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    I did three months on Turret and Capstan lathes as an apprentice. It was enough.

    Regards Tyrone.

  18. #36
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    I have a South Bend 10K. It originally had a second tailstock with lever feed and 6 position turret. That turret was rather loose so I bought a used Hardinge bed turret and adapted it to the South Bend. I spent a lot of time measuring and working out the required dimensions in CAD. I expected it to fit up dead nuts. It didn't and I spent many hours indicating and shimming. Now I have a South Bend turret lathe. There was a 4 position carriage stop and a turret tool toolpost. When using it as a turret lathe I remove the compound and mount the toolpost on an adapter that fits into the cross slide. It works quite well.

  19. #37
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    ^I have done the same with my heavy 10. I used a Hardinge indexing tailstock. The compound I replaced with a dovetailed table set up for front and back tooling.

    Tom


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