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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    I’ve bought a bunch of stuff from HGR.
    I bought a SB10L and it was worked to death and at best good for a few parts imo.
    I returned it on day 28 of the 30 day return window.
    They didn’t even come out to look it over, forklift guy was waiting for me when I walked out of the building and snatched it right up.
    I understand that it's easy to return. But to be honest, for what I paid for it I think I'd rather just part it out and take what I don't want to the scrap metal place down the road rather than drag it all the way back to HGR.


    That is nice to know about HGR though in the event that I should buy something more expensive and end up wanting to return it.

    They have a real nice South Bend lathe there that I would LOVE to have. It's $2,499. Which isn't a bad price IMHO if the lathe really is as good as it looks in the photos. Now that's an item I would return if it turned out not to be what I had hoped.

    In this case I can pretty much recoup the money from a trip to the scrap yard that's just around the corner from me. Scrap metal prices are low right now. I think it's 11 cent a hundred pound. But for a lathe that weights 3680 according to my calculations I could take it to the scrap yard right now and make $100 profit on it.

    So I would actually get more money taking it to the scrap yard than returning it to HGR.

    In fact, I guess I got it for LESS than scrap metal prices.

    In fact, they have another one there for $348. I should go get that one too and take it to the scrap yard after I scavenge it for parts. I'll make $50 in scrap metal on that one and get some spare parts to boot.

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweet Dreamer View Post
    Yes, I understand that I should be able to fire it up that way. I might try that just to test it out as you suggest.
    I wouldn’t hesitate! You should check all the oil and fluids (I have no idea what they be in your lathe) and once preflights are good then fire it up!

    Hope to hear of your Success

  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    I wouldn’t hesitate! You should check all the oil and fluids (I have no idea what they be in your lathe) and once preflights are good then fire it up!

    Hope to hear of your Success
    You'll need to be very patient with me if you're looking for quick success stories.

    Here's the scoop:

    1. I shouldn't even be buying this lathe as I already have too many projects, and no room for the lathe.

    2. This week I was working on repairing my roof when I decided to get the lathe (for a winter project).

    3. I stopped working on the roof to pick up the lathe. It took me three full days to get the lathe. One day to prepare the truck and trailer, one day to drive up and bring it home, and today I spent the entire day just making room to put it in the garage (still on the trailer). I put the whole shebang in the garage to be sure it doesn't get rained on.

    4. I really need to get back to the roofing work that I should have never abandoned in the first place.

    I also have a lot of other pressing fall maintenance projects that I need to finish before winter. I just grabbed this lathe right now because I like it and the price was right. I also didn't want to wait and have to pick one up in bad weather. So I kind of grabbed it now to work on later.

    I would love to get it all fired up and running ASAP myself. But I want to get the roof done while the weather is nice too.

    So shame on me for buying a lathe I NEVER should have bought.

    But let's NOT shame on me for not finishing my roof before bad weather. (hee hee)

    One shame at a time is all I can bear.

    So, yeah, I'll try to get to the lathe ASAP, but the roofing work comes first, as well as some much needed work on my winter heating system. Not to mention cutting firewood. I'll be quite busy. Anything I can squeak in on the lathe at this point will be a bonus.

    And like I say, I don't need to worry about the 30-day return because I'd make more money taking it in for scrap metal anyway. So that's where she goes if she turns out to be junk. I'm not taking it clear back to HGR. The scrap metal place is only a couple miles from me. Plus they'll pay me $100 more than I paid for it. So I'd be crazy to take it back to HGR and lose $100 in the process.

    So there's no need to rush to beat the 30-day return date.

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  6. #44
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    I completely understand!

    I have a sc300 Lexus NA-T in the garage for about 4 years now.
    A subpanel install that has a 0gauge aluminum conduit hanging out of my ceiling for about 4 months now,
    A compressor sitting waiting to pour my slab in the back and mount the compressor on.
    A 2ton central air handler in the garage waiting to be installed.
    A 2003 Subaru WRX in the drveway with the motor on a stand in my garage for about a year and half now.
    A RPC out back with a tire balancer hood sitting on top of it as a “temporary” shelter for bout a year.
    The wiring and controls for said RPC still nailed all over my garage wall as a “proof of concept” that worked so I just kinda left it.
    A concrete fire pit I started digging the hole for and kinda put that on the back burner.
    My hardwood floor that made it across the living room before I decided I was gonna delete a extra closet before finishing the hardwood floor.
    My bedroom has subfloors and a roll of carpet I was supposed to install 6months ago.
    My back bathroom that was “blank” when we moved in that I’m supposed to turn into a useable bathroom.
    My back deck that has a rotten beam that is getting sketchy.
    My bath vent fan that was supposed to run outside yet is just venting into the attic.


    More I’ve forgotten!

    I’m KING of leaving projects incomplete!

    Secretly it’s a way to make sure my girlfriend can’t easily replace me!

    “Who’s gonna fix the floor if I’m gone!?”

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  8. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    “Who’s gonna fix the floor if I’m gone!?”
    Possibly someone who might actually get around to doing it! Better watch out, you might not be as irreplaceable as you think.

    I could post my list of unfinished-ongoing projects too, but I didn't want to make the post too big.

    You mentioned flooring so I guess I should mention that I too am working on a flooring project in my bathroom. I'm putting in an oak floor. I cut the tree down last year. The tree was already dead when I cut it down so already part way cured even when on the sawmill. I cut the lumber specifically for this floor project. Then about a week later I planed down all the board. About a week after that I tongue and grooved them all. About a week after that I stained them all. Obviously I was doing a lot of other projects in the interim as it doesn't take a week to do each of these steps. But each step does cut into a major part of a day. In any case, I have the prepared flooring stacked up in the back room waiting for me to get around to tearing up the old flooring and installing the new. Not sure when that will happen. Currently the bathroom flooring is on a far lower priority level than roofing and heating system.

    You mentioned pouring concrete. I've been doing some of that this year too on my garage, and I have more to do. In fact, I'm planning on pouring a foundation for this lathe in the garage too. My garage doesn't have a concrete floor. In fact, all it currently has are oak planks just laying on dirt. And yes they are slowly rotting away. I replace bits and pieces every now and then. I have a sawmill and plenty of trees so it's easier to keep replacing rotten wood than to buy a lot of concrete.

    But it makes sense to pour a couple slabs for this lathe. So that's the current plan. I suppose I could even pour that in the winter since it's inside the garage. Hopefully I'll get to it before then. One problem is that I need to clear out the place where I'll be putting this lathe. So it's simply not readily accessible to just pour the concrete right now. A whole bunch of junk needs to find a new home, including a 1982 Yamaha Virago that's been sitting there waiting to be restored for about 10 years now. It's not currently road worthy. In fact, it pretty much needs a complete restoration. Although the motor itself should be ok. I filled the cylinder with oil years ago, and it was running great at that time. I imagine the carbs will need a complete rebuild by now though. I should probably put it on Craiglist. I'd have to almost give it away in its present condition though. This isn't something you can just tweak a few things and be on the road. It's going to need a complete restoration. A project that I have indeed put off for far too long. Had I done it 10 years ago it might not have been too bad.

    Anyway, I just came in from playing with the Warner & Swasey. I still can't figure out how to get the collet out. I took the cover off the collet holder. Do I need to now unbolt the collet holder to remove the collet? I don't see anything on the back of the lathe to release the collet. I also don't have an Allen Key large enough to remove the collet holder on the front of the spindle. I'll have to go out and buy some large wrenches to work on this thing. Looks like I'll need a 3/8" Allen key.

    I imagine this lathe should be all imperial right? Nothing should be metric on it.

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  10. #46
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    I would thing all imperial. No metric unless it got some chinesium bolts added later.

    I’ve found a surprising amount of imperial threaded bolts with metric heads on them over the years, mainly in the China junk I’ve bought.

    I’ve never messed with a W&S lathe so i may be useless to you there!

    And yep that’s why I left everything half completed and spend our saving! Can’t find a jack of all trades nor pay one either

    I have a 1979 xs400, kick start with spoke rims and drums front/rear, gonna hard tail it when I get the chance, mikes XS carbs and she runs SWEET!

    Also have a 81 xs650 kickstart but has mags and front disk,
    Plans are to PMA, springer from end (really want a sugar bear) DE-raked, hardtail. Etc.

    And I have a 96 gsxF600 that my little brother stood up and went 13 o-clock.

    Bent the tail up like a sissy bar, broke all the pegs off, both cases and handle bars, that’s been sitting for about 3 years with a parts bike that has mysteriously morphed into a giant bush!

    A 96 Polaris scrambler 400 2stroke that also turned into a bush and a go kart.

    That bush is getting really unruly..

    Man I commend your skills and efforts! I don’t have really anything to work tree Carcass with besides my basic stuff to flip apartments and run maintenance. I owned a chainsaw but kinda lost track of it LOL.

    My house is a post tensioned slab so I couldn’t drill into it to bolt the lathe down.

    I thought (and still do) about pouring a small slab onto of it to mount the lathe to.

    That beast of your weights more then my SB16! Whatever you do make sure she’s solid.

    I mounted a 10 inch chuck to a 14” face plate cause I’m a glutton for punishment, mid run the chuck slid to the edge of the faceplate and that big girl started dancing!

    Does your lathe have a compound rest? I didn’t see one

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Does your lathe have a compound rest? I didn’t see one.
    No, these types of production lathes don't come with one. So it's not like it's missing, it just never had one.

    I might add one to it at some point since I'm going to be treating it more like an engine lathe than a turret lathe. It doesn't have a threaded lead screw or a half-nut. I've been told that you can't do threading with it. At least not like can be done using an engine lathe. But I'm wondering if that's really true?

    If the table clutch doesn't slip I don't see why it couldn't be used to thread, other than the fact that you'd also need to change the lead screw gears, but it's my understanding that they can be changed. In fact, I just watched a video where a fellow made his own quick change gearbox. Although, his lathe has a threaded lead screw and half-nut. He just got tired of having to manually change the gears for threading.

    I'm looking forward to trying to thread with this lathe at some point just to do if it is indeed possible. Like I say, if the table clutch can be trusted to not slip I don't see why not. You just need to line it up with a dial indicator between each pass. I'll certainly discover whether or not it's doable because I'll definitely be giving that a shot at some point.

  12. #48
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    I've been told that you can't do threading with it. At least not like can be done using an engine lathe. But I'm wondering if that's really true?
    -Yes, it is.

    To start with, the feed rod gearing would not lend itself well to adding or even changing the gears. It's one of those things that I'm sure could be done, by someone with enough time, patience, skill and money, but it would be an incredibly involved project.

    Second, it's a feed rod, not a lead screw. There's no way to "index" the carriage position with the spindle. Sure, you could park the carriage at the same spot with a dial indicator, but when you engage the clutch, it's impossible to know that the workpiece is in the correct position. IE, it could easily be 180 degrees out, or 90, or 63-1/2, or 137 degrees, or whatever.

    That's the whole point of the threading dial on a conventional engine lathe. It keeps things in time to the rotation of the spindle, not just the left-right position.

    I won't say it's "impossible" to convert, stranger things have happened. But I can say that it'd likely take so much time and effort, and give such fiddly results, that you'd have been better off just buying a proper lathe.

    Now, all that said, I'm given to understand, through the W&S books, that there are in fact optional threading or chasing attachments. But, I'm also given to understand that these days, they're extremely rare, with most turret owners having never even seen one, let alone used one.

    I'm also not at all sure they fit the smaller machines- I believe they may only be for the bigger ones, but I may be wrong on that.

    Really, you'd be better off fitting a common hand-die head, or investing in a Geometric type die head.

    Doc.

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  14. #49
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    Doc is right, I can't imagine trying to work out a system to thread, in the way you would with an engine lathe.

    The price or condition actually doesn't worry me. I bet you a dollar its fundamentally sound, but probably needs minor repairs, maintenance etc.

    The price on all turret lathes are pretty low. For production work, a real shop will have cnc. For manual guys, they want engine or tool room lathes. They're practically giving turret lathes away.

    While I do think a regular engine lathe is preferable for a manual machine, I think that W and S can do great work even if not production. But you would want to play to it's strengths. Drilling and boring with power fed turret. Longitudinal cuts on main carriage.

    It may not sound sexy, but a great deal of work, including restorations, is cleaning up or cutting down shafts, and boring their respective bores, adding sleeves/bushings, then boring the bushings to fit shafts. That's all straight work, no fancy tricks. I think this lathe could do it very well.

    You mentioned you have projects on top of projects, so not sure how or when you'll get to it. If you go through the machine right, tearing it down all the way, It could take a year in your spare time. That's not necessarily terrible. It's fun in its own right, plus you'll know the machine inside and out by the end. You don't have to do that, but at the very least I would clean, lube, and change oil in everything before I put power to it. A phase convertor would not be on my mind, till that was done.

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    Hey Guys,
    Here's a link to a 'Swasey that went south' doing what Warner & Swasey turret lathes do.
    Warner & Swasey #3 Lathe work - YouTube
    Note that it is a bar machine ( or is that a chucker ? memory fails at times). Bout what Ya'll can expect as far coolant flinging just so you can get an idea of what to expect.. Also has both internal and external threading.
    What that strikes me as odd is the guy indexing the turret manually and in reverse order.. Also turning from the rear position on the cross slide and the cutoff tool in the 'front' position.. I always learn watching other folks setups..
    Stay safe
    Calvin B

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    Quote Originally Posted by calvin b View Post
    What that strikes me as odd is the guy indexing the turret manually and in reverse order.. Also turning from the rear position on the cross slide and the cutoff tool in the 'front' position.. I always learn watching other folks setups..
    It's a nicely made video, but take it with a grain of salt. Or a truckload?
    Don't learn "wrongness".

    He must be self-taught, trying to figure out how to make "some" use of it and "run what he has", because he's doing it all wrong as far as "normal" operations go.

    Dunno if they are "out there" on You Tube or not.

    But black & white 16 mm training and bragging films War Two - before - and shortly after, you'd see an ENTIRELY different concept of what a W&S, Gisholt, and a select few others DID do.

    "Shock and awe" are not an overstatement. Binloads of chips happen FAST!
    The vids showing an EMPTY machine's mechanicals still work just do not capture it.

    They DO show that hands and arms are NOT inside the work envelope. Everything had safely "external" controls, most of them powered.

    The vid you cited is barely even "kinda f**kin' around" class, and not even safe operation, compared to a machine hall at full gallop.

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    Thermite, Sir
    Yeah I feel your pain. It's always been hard for me to watch the ignorant run industrial cast offs after being around folks from back when safety procedures and techniques were taught and practiced.
    I've been in shops where there is a man assigned just to clear chips to the chip hopper ( think pre-chip conveyors times)of a line of swaseys.. They can move the chips when need be.
    I posted the video mainly for the threading aspect nothing more.. If, in your travels about the "net" you happen to run across a video or two of old school turret lathe operations I'd be much obliged if you would post them.
    Thanks in advance
    Stay safe
    Calvin B

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    Quote Originally Posted by calvin b View Post
    Thermite, Sir
    Yeah I feel your pain. It's always been hard for me to watch the ignorant run industrial cast offs after being around folks from back when safety procedures and techniques were taught and practiced.
    I've been in shops where there is a man assigned just to clear chips to the chip hopper ( think pre-chip conveyors times)of a line of swaseys.. They can move the chips when need be.
    I posted the video mainly for the threading aspect nothing more.. If, in your travels about the "net" you happen to run across a video or two of old school turret lathe operations I'd be much obliged if you would post them.
    Thanks in advance
    Stay safe
    Calvin B
    Don't "sir" me! I wore stripes before I wore bars, never forgot how to work for my tucker!



    I DID go looking. ALL I could find were dealers showing off that all the mechanicals still worked, one machine, one function at a time . or some hobbyist.

    There are STILL a few things these old beasts could do that CNC is no BETTER at, but CNC being more flexible and the hard stuff being done on a screen or a box-tick on a Purchase Order, instead of 100% in the metal, they are pretty much gone.

    Suburban Pittsburgh, 1950's early '60's, cold war and all.. we were still getting the 16mm major-industry films, so I know they "existed" at one time.

    Main difference from a modern CNC rig spewing coolant and chips in all directions is the turret-lathe "controllor" was a human, not a computer, and the CNC works inside a hooch so the s**t don't fly all over the next row in the machine-hall.

    The turret bangers took slower cuts than CNC, but they were heavier cuts, so not as many passes of them. Net thoughput wasn't all that different.

    They are not that "new", either. Before she met my G'Dad. my G'Mum had been engaged. Her fiancee fell in Battle of the Somme. She was upper-middle-class, not MEANT to be working in a factory, but got so pissed-off at the Germans she vanished from the family home and was recovered two weeks later.

    She had take a train to London, stayed with family, gotten a job - Woolwich Arsenal I think it was.

    All four-foot ten inches of slender English lass running... ta da .. a turret lathe.

    That made, as she proudly put it half a century later:

    "those little pointy things that go on the end"

    ... of heavy artillery projectiles!

    Turret lathe was TOOLED and set-up by a SERIOUS "master" at the craft. The designers of them, even more so. "Wizard class" even.

    It was meant to be OPERATED by anyone who could stand in one place for ten to sixteen hours making the same dreary sequence of body motions one after another without losing track and screwing up. A meat and blood ROBOT, if you will.

    Cost of tooling and OPERATING at today's skills and wages, the CNC rig is prolly able to deliver for about 20 percent of what the turrets would cost.

    And the operator no longer needs to be bugf**k nuts or become that way out of boredom! Even on a tiny Hardinge second-op, it was brain-numbing work. to be that "meat robot".

    That stark a difference. I do not miss them. Let a CNC computer get bored.

    Now.. converting all that durable and powerful goodness to a general purpose lathe?

    That I can see, actually.

    It just isn't at all hard to add a compound. The cross was BUILT with tee-slots to take all sorts of tooling, fore and aft.

    One COULD even make it a CNC servo-ed compound......

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    That's the whole point of the threading dial on a conventional engine lathe. It keeps things in time to the rotation of the spindle, not just the left-right position.
    I understand. I currently have a lathe with a lead screw and threading gears (no quick change gearbox). It also doesn't have a threading dial. The instructions simple tell you to leave the lathe engaged. Stop it at the end of the thread and simple run it in reverse to get back to the starting position. Since it was never disengaged from the lead screw and the half-nut was never opened it's stays in the original alignment.

    It's a bit of a pain to use it this way. First, the lathe has no brake and it's lowest RPM is 150. It coasts pretty far when shut off. This means that you either need to have a huge thread clearance groove at the end of the thread, or you need to stop before you get to the end and turn the chuck by hand to finish the last couple threads.

    I actually bought a threading dial for the lathe so I can disengage the half-nut when threading. In fact, it's currently in the mail and I'm waiting for it to arrive.

    In the interim I found a video where a fellow explains how to disengage the half-nut without using a threading dial. It's a little involved. You need to mark the spindle position and the lead screw position when you start your cut. You can actually make a couple dials for that so you can just read the dials. When you finish your first cut you disengage the half-nut, shut the lathe off, return the carriage to the precise starting position, which can be done either by using a carriage stop or a dial indicator. Then you need to manually turn the chuck until both the chuck and the lead screw are at the starting positions.

    This might seem like a lot of work, but it's actually not so bad. It allows me to disengage the half-nut lever and be sure to reengage it in the proper synchronization. It works. But of course, a thread dial will be easier to use so I'll install that when it comes too.

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    I won't say it's "impossible" to convert, stranger things have happened. But I can say that it'd likely take so much time and effort, and give such fiddly results, that you'd have been better off just buying a proper lathe.
    Well, this Warner & Swasey has a brake. So I should be able to stop it quickly. I could either leave the table engaged and just return to the start position by running in reverse (which is how my lathe was designed to be used). Or I could use the trick of indexing the positions of the spindle, lead screw (or feed rod), and the table. Just like I've been doing on my lathe without a threading dial.

    So as long as I can trust the table clutch not to slip it should be doable.

    Obviously making the proper threading gears for the feed rod would be an extra project, but also one that is doable. In fact this S&W lathe has easily changeable feed rod gears. They offer a second set of gears to double the speed of the feed rod. So the option to make gears for a specific thread rate is clearly there.

    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    Really, you'd be better off fitting a common hand-die head, or investing in a Geometric type die head.
    I'd love to get one of those too. But those are only good for short threads. I'd like to be able to use this lathe to cut long acme thread lead screws. That won't even need to be that accurate. I won't be using them on machines. In fact, I actually want to make them for vices on woodworking benches. So they won't need to be accurate, just usable.

    So yeah, I'll definitely be looking into the possibility of using this lathe for this purpose, at least in part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    The price on all turret lathes are pretty low. For production work, a real shop will have cnc. For manual guys, they want engine or tool room lathes. They're practically giving turret lathes away.
    EXACTLY! I got this lathe for less than scrap metal prices. In fact, I could take it to the scrap metal place right now and make $100 profit from what I paid for it.

    Where am I going to find a GOOD engine lathe this size at this price?

    I did have my eye on a beautiful South Bend engine lathe complete with a taper attachment. But they are asking $2,500 for it. And they'll probably get it because, as you point out, Engine lathes are in demand. Everybody wants one including me!

    I just don't have $2,500 to invest in a lathe right now. So I have to make do with what I can afford to pick up. This lathe seems to be in pretty nice condition thus far. I've seen cheaper engine lathes, but they are often missing major important parts, or are in really bad condition. Or they may simple be a model or type that I just don't like. Most other people probably don't like them either and that's why they are cheap.


    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    While I do think a regular engine lathe is preferable for a manual machine, I think that W and S can do great work even if not production. But you would want to play to it's strengths. Drilling and boring with power fed turret. Longitudinal cuts on main carriage.
    EXACTLY! About the only thing I can't easily do with it is threading long rods. But even that may actually be doable, we'll see about that. So this lathe will work for me quite well on just about everything but threading.


    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    You mentioned you have projects on top of projects, so not sure how or when you'll get to it. If you go through the machine right, tearing it down all the way, It could take a year in your spare time. That's not necessarily terrible. It's fun in its own right, plus you'll know the machine inside and out by the end. You don't have to do that, but at the very least I would clean, lube, and change oil in everything before I put power to it. A phase convertor would not be on my mind, till that was done.
    I'm not in any rush and I love to restore old machines. In fact, I already figured that I'll probably be improving this lathe and restoring it over a long period of time. Although, I'm hoping that I can also be using it in the interim. I'll just restore pieces of it at a time. So it won't be down for the entire restoration period.

    In fact, HGR has another one almost identical that they are asking $348 for. Strangely it doesn't appear to be in as good of shape as the one I got at a lower price. In any case, if I could, I would pick that one up to for spare parts. But this one is still on the trailer. So I couldn't even get the other one if I wanted to. Besides, I really can't afford to buy two of these in a row right now. This one is already stretching my budget as cheap as it was. I probably should have taken it straight to the scrap yard and just made a quick $100. Nah, I couldn't do that!

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    By the way. If anyone knows where I can buy a good Engine Lathe in good condition for less than scrap metal prices please do let me know. I'll be right over to grab it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweet Dreamer View Post
    By the way. If anyone knows where I can buy a good Engine Lathe in good condition for less than scrap metal prices please do let me know. I'll be right over to grab it.
    LOL! "In good condition"? Got a golden spoon hanging out of yer arse? Mrs. God's high-heeled shoes budget?

    Less than scrap Platinum prices, maybe?

    Why should you have all the luck when the rest of us have had to take what we can afford!


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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Why should you have all the luck when the rest of us have had to take what we can afford!

    Before you put me in a group I don't belong in please recall that I too bought what I could afford!

    As I've pointed out elsewhere in the thread there was a beautiful South Bend lathe at HGR that I would love to have. Plus it was actually "reasonably priced" at $2,500 as far as I'm concerned, assuming that it was in as good condition as the photos suggest.

    The problem is that I can't afford to spend $2,500 on a lathe right now. Trust me, if I could I would have bought that one in a heartbeat! I think it's worth the money, I just don't have that kind of cash right now.

    My congratulations to anyone who can afford it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweet Dreamer View Post
    Before you put me in a group I don't belong in please recall that I too bought what I could afford!

    As I've pointed out elsewhere in the thread there was a beautiful South Bend lathe at HGR that I would love to have. Plus it was actually "reasonably priced" at $2,500 as far as I'm concerned, assuming that it was in as good condition as the photos suggest.

    The problem is that I can't afford to spend $2,500 on a lathe right now. Trust me, if I could I would have bought that one in a heartbeat! I think it's worth the money, I just don't have that kind of cash right now.

    My congratulations to anyone who can afford it.
    LOL! The only thing as ever left South Bend Indiana as was worth $2,500 or more had four wheels and rubber tires under it!

    The first 10EE was about half that. $1,200 or so?

    It was in running order, too, but the PO had a NICER 10EE, so it didn't even have a dead center with it.

    The Cazeneuve is weird, but I like it! THERE's a machine with low wear!

    Semetimes you find the best condition in UNCOMMON brand names, yah?

    Or maybe a turret lathe, that nobody thinks will work for general-purpose use?

    Well it surely CAN do! It's just a bit like going shopping for a Big Gulp and a bag of Doritos in a steam locomotive.

    Yah simply have to get used to it needing a bigger place to park, and you have your snacks.

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    I have a special attraction to this South Bend lathe. I learned on one just like it in high school, and then I actually bought one and had it for a while before having to give it up due to moving.

    This one at HGR is pretty much identical to the one I used to have. So this model has a special place in my heart.

    Check it out on HGR, it's a real sweetie if you like South Bend lathes. Inventory number:0720-179-0001

    It frustrating not to have the cash to grab it. Although I wouldn't say this is a steal. I'm pretty sure you can pick these up for $2,500 or less on a regular basis. In fact, I've seen them going to more like $1,500 on Craigslist, or even less if you lucky. But this one has the taper attachment which I also like. If I had the cash I'd probably go for this one. It looks to be in pretty good shape.


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