What The Heck Is An MSC27 Machine?
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    Mar 2005
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    Most readers will recall what the 2MSC Machine was. You know, the twin spindle CNC Chucker that we built in the Nashville plant, under liscense from EMAG in Germany!

    Many, however, will not recall what the MSC27 machine was, also of EMAG origin, and not, I believe, ever visualized to be built by us in this couuntry.

    Give up? It was an automatic center drive turning machine, that was available in several configurations. One was with a single medium capacity spindle through a centrally located headstock, and with a slide and one indexing turret at each end of the bed, to permit simultaneous cutting on both ends of a long part. Another configuration had the same centrally located headstock, but had two slides, each with an indexing turret, opposite each other, at each end of the bed for more complex operations.

    Perhaps the most interesting version of all, though, was the one with two headstocks on the same centerline with a slide on the outboard side of each head. This would handle the very long parts. All slides employed indexing square turrets.

    EMAG had developed a modular component structure, so that these machines were not really as "special" as they appeared to be.

    The types of workpieces considered prime for these machines were various Pipes for the oil industry, typical about 51" long and about 8" diameter, Hydraulic Cylinders around 17" long and 5" diameter, Couplings around 12" long and 5" diameter, Coal Mine Axles around 29" long and 3" diameter, and a Tie Rod that was around 43" long and 1.7" diameter. These were among the, actual high production jobs tooled up and run on the MSC27 in Europe.

    To the best of my knowledge, W/S quoted and sold only two of these Center Drive Machines, for an ordinance application. I do not know whether the machines ever got shipped or not.

    This will give you another example of W/S attempts to move ahead with progressive machine tool design, even though it was "borrowed" from a partner.


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