Anyone have a Sawstop in the shop? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    Over the years I have heard that they are 'good saws'

    I have often wondered, why not a regular EM brake? Why destructive?
    The issue is time. I'm no engineer, but the time to slow down the blade needs to be fairly fast (SawStop reportedly claims to keep the contact to 1-2 teeth of the saw when using a 10" saw). A non-destructive braking system would likely need to be so big/industrial that it would price it out of the prosumer market. But that's one man's opinion.

    If I ever got a table saw (which I don't think I ever will), I would absolutely buy the saw stop because the cost of the cartridge and saw blades are much much much cheaper than the cost of loosing a finger/thumb. I would think of it as insurance.

  2. #22
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    I had a hand injury this summer... I would pay far more than the price of a cartridge and blade to not go through that. The ordeal cost me $6000 out of pocket (I had insurance) and one of my fingers doesn't even work correctly. Penny wise bitching about a sub $200 cost over serious injury.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizingkid View Post
    I had a hand injury this summer... I would pay far more than the price of a cartridge and blade to not go through that. The ordeal cost me $6000 out of pocket (I had insurance) and one of my fingers doesn't even work correctly. Penny wise bitching about a sub $200 cost over serious injury.
    Seconded. I damn near took the tip off one finger with a bandsaw, clipped the nerve, and it never will work right again. A few hundred for a cart and blade? Chump change, and glad to pay it.

    I've used them in school situations, as well as the original Tech-Shop in Menlo Park. (the big original cabinet saw)
    Yeah, they blew on a pretty regular basis, but there were reasons why. Largely due to operator headspace errors. (Cutting carbon fiber sheets being one of them. (It's conductive....)) But if you understand what's going to trip it, you can go years without ever blowing a cart. I've never blown one, and none of my people has either.
    I can also say that I have personally chopped right through a medium sized nail with one, and had no problem. (Accidentally.)
    The problem comes if the nail is touching you (or something conductive that *is* touching you). Then it blows.

    My understanding of it is that there's a sort of carried potential on living skin, and if the sensor on the saw picks up that signal, it blows the cart. Just metal won't do it, it has to be metal touching living skin. (it's sort of like the old touch switch lamps, as I understand it. (dimly))
    As far as why it's a destructive stop, the issue is speed. As I recall from the demos, the blade is dead stopped and physically below the table in about 5 milliseconds. Damned quick, in other words. They use the momentum of the blade to snap it down below the table, and get it out of contact *right f---king now*.
    There are videos of it on youtube. You really should watch, the engineering is elegant. (The politics suck, but the engineering is elegant, and well worth respect.)

    As far as kickback, they've got a really nice riving knife on them, and seem to be pretty immune to it barring the aggressively stupid.

    I'm actually selling my 3 phase, 2 speed unisaw, mostly just to trade for a sawstop, if that tells you anything. (anybody want one in Santa Cruz? It's got a Bessymer fence on it, and all sorts of goodies...including a mist coolant system.... (it was rigged for cutting carbon fiber & composites before I got it.))

    One final note: half a lifetime ago, I watched a good friend of mine put her hand through a dado head. I looked over, saw something looked funny, realized what she was about to do, and just couldn't get my mouth moving fast enough. Half a lifetime later, I still have screaming nightmares about that. I'd pay a whole lot more than $150 or so not to have that memory. So yeah, it costs. A whole lot less than the alternative.

    Regards,
    Brian

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by medsar View Post
    The issue is time. I'm no engineer, but the time to slow down the blade needs to be fairly fast (SawStop reportedly claims to keep the contact to 1-2 teeth of the saw when using a 10" saw). A non-destructive braking system would likely need to be so big/industrial that it would price it out of the prosumer market. But that's one man's opinion.

    If I ever got a table saw (which I don't think I ever will), I would absolutely buy the saw stop because the cost of the cartridge and saw blades are much much much cheaper than the cost of loosing a finger/thumb. I would think of it as insurance.
    You are probably correct, but I think it could be made to work adequately in a non destructive fashion. Reading up on it, the Bosch system of dropping the blade is probably just as effective.

    The sensing technology was really the breakthrough, the implementation, meh.

  6. #25
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    I had an “industrial” finger amputation. Dr. was able to reimplamt the digit but the middle joint is fused. My medical bill total was over $100.000 by the time workmans comp finalized the rehab. Sawstop, yeah I’d own one.
    I agree that the principal played hardball and ruffled a lot of feathers. He did however push through and market the saw. Which is what he should have done from square one IMHO.
    Joe

  7. #26
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    Agree with all of the above- the cost of cartridge and blade doesn’t concern me in the least, even accounting for nuisance trips.
    I would really not appreciate a saw that faults out for unknown reason however and will not power up.
    From what I am gathering, this sort of issue is not occurring in shops with the saw.

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  9. #27
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    If I had a cabinet saw, it would be a Sawstop.

    That said, I prefer Euro saws. Just ordered a Felder KF700SP saw/shaper. 12-16 weeks out, so now we play the waiting game.

  10. #28
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    The saw shaper combo is a useful tool- especially to back up another saw or shaper- it is always when a machine is carefully set up with a special jig or whatever that you end up needing to cut a shim or something, and would have to tear down the set up to do it. Instead, just pop the fence on the felder and go to it.

    I wish sawstop had a 12" version.


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