Building sawmills
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  1. #1
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    Default Building sawmills

    Hi I've just registard here. I have been building band saws and wood machinery
    I now want to build a saw Mill and need advice constructing the ride and fall machanism.and the type of wheels and rail . I figure to cut lumber up to 2foot dia
    I would appreciate an knowlage
    Thanks

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    Go to YouTube and search for Matt Cremona. He has series of videos on how he built a large band saw mill. Lots of videos of him using it, also.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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    Check out the forestry forum. I have built 2 sawmills and a lot of other woodworking machines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    Hi I've just registard here. I have been building band saws and wood machinery
    I now want to build a saw Mill and need advice constructing the ride and fall machanism.and the type of wheels and rail . I figure to cut lumber up to 2foot dia
    I would appreciate an knowlage
    Thanks
    .
    the technical knowledge and experience is considerable. some web site offer tools and some help. usually better to buy a turnkey setup. somebody designs, builds, tests equipment proving its working and turns the key over and gets paid for it.
    TKT Engineering

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    Nothing like a Frick carriage shoving a log thru a sharp
    6' dia. blade with a screaming deetroit behind it....Yeah !

    Governor picks it up just as the blade touches the log, no slowing down.

  6. Likes Ray Behner, Winterfalke liked this post
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Nothing like a Frick carriage shoving a log thru a sharp
    6' dia. blade with a screaming deetroit behind it....Yeah !

    Governor picks it up just as the blade touches the log, no slowing down.
    Boy, have you got that right! I had a Sinker-Davis mill with a cast iron husk that wouldn't quit. Even thought the power was gas it still sounded great.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Behner View Post
    Boy, have you got that right! I had a Sinker-Davis mill with a cast iron husk that wouldn't quit. Even thought the power was gas it still sounded great.
    Pioneer steam & gas is a show every summer in nearby Saegertown pa.
    Pioneer Steam & Gas Engine Society of Northwestern Pennsylvania, Inc.

    They have a steam powered sawmill, the engine is quiet enough you can hear the blade cutting, the steam engine just knocks a little when it picks up the load.

  9. #8
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    We have a great steam powered saw mill here in Northern California- it's a blast to watch it run!!! Most folks don't even know its there.
    Home

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    You don't say what level of funk, er, cost and speed of construction you'd like.

    I'm fond of the DIY car tire units, myself, though I'd never build one, having a friend with Woodmizer....

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    I'm fond of the DIY car tire units,
    I'm not.
    As a machine designer, I have had qty (2) friends come to me with grandiose ideas, because they bought
    "the book", actually a small hand pamphlet describing how one person cobbled together the one with car wheels. Very lacking on actual "plans" or those pesky leetle "details"

    The car wheels don't/won't strain the blade enough.

    And the supporting structure ? This is also way too light to properly strain the blade.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I'm not....The car wheels don't/won't strain the blade enough.... the supporting structure .... is also way too light to properly strain the blade.
    To each his own.

    There's more than one way to build a support structure. Using automotive/truck spindles to hold the wheels/tires, steering mechanisms for tracking adjustments and tire inflation to set blade strain is pretty damn cheap, available and ingenious, IMO. And could be very appropriate if the "pesky leetle details" were attended to.

    There's a variety of 'em on YT.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    To each his own.

    There's more than one way to build a support structure. Using automotive/truck spindles to hold the wheels/tires, steering mechanisms for tracking adjustments and tire inflation to set blade strain is pretty damn cheap, available and ingenious, IMO. And could be very appropriate if the "pesky leetle details" were attended to.

    There's a variety of 'em on YT.
    Yes, there is, but they don't tell you about fighting constant problems with tracking, wandering cuts, etc.
    Having to baby each and every cut, instead of getting on with the job at hand, that is cutting lumber.

    Doo you know what Lennox advises for proper strain ?

    You'll never hit anywhere near that number with rubber tires.

  14. #13
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    doug is right, the amount of tension recommended for band saw blades, around 25K psi, is far more than most realize. I have a tension gauge, and to properly tension a 1/2" blade on my 20" Powermatic 81 and 87 saws I have to bottom out the springs, and then crank WAY further!

  15. #14
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    I knew that number at one time.

    I've had discussions with Lenox applications folks about it when learning more about their blade tensioning gauge. The number varies, according to them, depending on the many variables in any application. Best, in their opinion, was an empirical approach: high enough to yield an acceptable cut, low enough to avoid fatigue problems in the gullet.

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    I was watching this one yesterday and found it particularly gratifying:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DHM_ztAUqVc

    And a more pro video of the same mill.
    The Phillips Mill which must be well known to you folk:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zAvurSjBVW8


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