Delta 12/14 tablesaw stub arbor thread Cw or CCW
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  1. #1
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    Default Delta 12/14 tablesaw stub arbor thread Cw or CCW

    I would like to unscrew and replace the stub arbor on my Delta 12/14 tablesaw from the 1950's. I have tried unthreading it and got no movement. Before I break out the impact wrench I should ask if the threads are CW or CCW to remove. I assume they are left hand threads like the ones that hold on the blade nut.
    Bill D

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    Bill, it's been 40 years since I had mine out, can't remember. Seems like it should be a left hand thread, but if no one confirms it for you here, these guys would surely be able to help.

    Old Woodworking Machines - Old Woodworking Machines

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    Some of the 12/14 saws had non-removable arbors.

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    Bill,

    I don't know what or where the 'stub arbor' is located but any nut or thread associated with the blade would/should unscrew in the direction of blade rotation. This is standard for saw arbor nuts...don't know about your 'stub arbor' though. Popping it with the impact won't hurt a thing...if you're going the wrong direction nothing will happen..if you're going the right direction it will unscrew.

    Stuart

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    OP here: Got it out. it is 5/8 left hand thread. I had to make a pin wrench to fit. it uses 1/4" pins. Not on a standard two inch diameter but something like 1+7/8.
    Bill D.

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    Those arbors were close to $150 each back in the late 1960s.

    The standard arbor is a 1" short arbor for single blades. For dado blades there are long arbors, but they can interfere when tilting the blade.
    Delta offered arbors in 1", 1 1/8, and 1 1/4" short and long.

    Grizzly made a copy of the Delta 12/14 saw, the Grizzly G5959, they had arbors for sale, but I heard they have run out. They made a 5/8" arbor that Delta never did.

    I went ahead and made a 1" dado arbor, and a 5/8" arbor to use blades I already had, rather then buy from Grizzly.


    When installing the arbor, it does not need to be much more then finger tight, the nature of the mount requires the tapers to actually have to rotate before the fine thread can actually push the arbor out. If too tight, that can be very hard to do.
    In use, the arbor assembly heats up a little, if an arbor is removed hot, and replaced with a cold one, it can get severely stuck.

    Easy project to make,

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    How and when did you broach the hex in the end? I was thinking drill the 7/16 hole first and use it for a center hole. Then broach it last after all the lathe work is done. Can I really broach it with a impact allen socket wrench?
    Interesting to see you bring the taper out to the full 1.25 diameter even for the 5/8 arbor. I had been wondering about that.
    Bill D

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    The arbor has flats for an open end wrench, it appears that they did use an inside hex for an allen wrench sometime after my saw was made about 1968.
    This photo shows the saws original 1" short arbor, the flat a little bit visable on the end.
    I was just cutting the seating taper there, on the end of the 5/8" arbor, I finished with a short external 3/8" hex. I used a pre-hardened 4140.





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    It seems the taper is 30 degrees which is the same as used on some pipe reamers.
    Bill D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    It seems the taper is 30 degrees which is the same as used on some pipe reamers.
    Bill D.
    I went with 3/8 allen hex broach which is small enough it worked in the 5/8 arbor as well as the 1". Easier to keep it all the same size. I used. a cut off Allen wrench as a broach. Folks on this board thought 7/16 was too big to do with my limited equipment. it is difficult to find 7/16 wrenches as well. 3/8 only one store in town had.
    Bill D


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