Had an Accident *Graphic* (WTB: Old Craftsman Table Saw guard) - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 67 of 67
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    2,979
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2780
    Likes (Received)
    1413

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by henrya View Post
    You’re gonna hurt yourself.

    Please take that shit off the saw while your hands still work. Then fix the fence to blade relationship and put a smooth slick face on the fence. The fence as it is now is dangerous. Really.

    I am glad you are paying attention to safety, but that guard is not the answer. Anything that interferes with your work being fed through properly is not helping you be safe. A properly adjusted table saw used with correct technique is a very safe tool, but completely unforgiving. of foolishness.
    I'm not following how the sacrificial board makes the fence more dangerous. I'm in total agreement that the surface of the fence needs to be square with the blade. It was removed to confirm that the fence itself was straight. My next step was going to be plaining it and rechecking adjustment, but other than cleaning up the arcs from the blade, I don't see it being any further out of parallel than it was previously. I put it on the saw to illustrate what we normally do.

    As far as the guard goes, as I stated previously, it alone won't prevent kickbacks while good habits and respect for the tool will have a bigger influence. The guard provides a splitter (which likewise needs to be properly adjusted) and it prevents idiots from getting their fingers too close to the blade. That wasn't the accident that started this thread but it seems to be one of two most common table saw accidents (the other being kick-backs). Most of the finger cutting stories I've been told we less about grabbing a spinning blade and more about getting just a little too close. The guard gives more of a safe zone to mitigate that risk, as well as reducing the chance of someone swiping their hand across the blade between cuts.

    I'm not the only user of this saw and it's easier to have the guards in place and operators trained in safety than to hope against hope that they won't do something stupid. This guard has the advantage IMO of easy removal and replacement so it can be taken off when the task requires, but as most of the work on this saw is ripping long boards and plywood, I don't see it getting in the way.

    From what I've seen, what often happens in shops in general is people get in a rush and take a guard off rather than finding a way to work with it. That rush mentality is what causes most accidents as now you have an operator rushing into an unguarded machine. The idea that any guard makes something safe is a fallacy. It's not an electric fence between you and a tiger, it's a stanchion between you and a cliff.

  2. Likes henrya liked this post
  3. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    594
    Likes (Received)
    763

    Default

    Another way to increase safety is to use a power feeder on your saw. Especially for any sort of large repetitive job, where one tends to get bored and tired, and the attention can wander. Those are when accidents often happen.

    Ripping with a power feed can guarantee the work stays on the fence and down on the table. The feed rolls can straddle the blade, or if need be the blade can cut into them. It can also be useful to have an auxiliary fence that's lower that's just a bit lower than the work. While you're drilling and tapping for the feeder base, might as well as some bolt holes for holding shop made fences too.

    Anything that helps to get your hands away from the blade or reduce the amount of force you have to apply to the work makes you safer.

    And another vote for using the bandsaw as an alternative whenever possible. So much calmer and drama free!

  4. Likes Trboatworks, M.B. Naegle, henrya, Bob-J-H liked this post
  5. #63
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,781
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    532
    Likes (Received)
    404

    Default

    One of my saws has a formica rip fence surface, the other a well waxed piece of birch plywood. What I like about having all sliding surfaces slick, is that you pretty much only feel the drag of the blade cutting. Any rough or frictiony surface puts drag on the work and might overcome the feel of the blade cutting and might be just enough to cause a little bind. Any kind of hicky on the fence or table is a no-go for me. Its just a little flaw that might make something go badly wrong. When I push the part over toward the fence and through the blade and all I feel is just a “zing and its over” is the kind of saw operation I want.

  6. Likes M.B. Naegle liked this post
  7. #64
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,781
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    532
    Likes (Received)
    404

    Default

    Its kinda funny, not funny, but I have committed more dumbassery on a bandsaw than most tools. Last I blew up some pvc pipe like a bomb. Bad band tooth selection and dumbassery on my part.

    The scariest wood working machine I have is a router. There is no real reason for this but I feel like I am juggling a rattlesnake the whole time I’m using it. Always relieved when that’s over. And that’s not changed in about 40 years of using them.

  8. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    4,967
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2412
    Likes (Received)
    3093

    Default

    Most of my routing work has gone to a robust table setup with a commercial lift.
    I have pins in the plate to help with starting cuts, use a power feeder when lots of sticks of small profile need done.
    It still can get exciting when some small bit of stock needs a profile cut around it etc.
    I use the heel of hand on table and fingertips on stock technique- if the stock gets grabbed it just slips away and has no tendency to pull my hand or fingers nearer the cutter.

    Yeah- band saws are sleepers for injuries and have their own set of risks even if they don't toss stock back at you.
    I keep a Lenox Trimester in the big saw and that blade scares me a bit as I figure any touch and it will snag you and....
    On the small bandsaw I have one of the 14tpi die-master blades on it and it is much more relaxing to use when the blade has to be exposed.

  9. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    594
    Likes (Received)
    763

    Default

    IMHO a big shaper is the all time scariest tool out there!

    I like to grind my own knives, use lock edge collars, but still observe all loose knife cautions - nut finger tight at first to ensure knives are well gripped, then tighten seriously, double nuts. Everyone on the floor for startup in case something is amiss. I even have a 1/2" cdx apron, made for shaping brass & aluminum, those chips are like shrapnel. Gotta make really good fixtures, so work is held well, and hands away from knives. Starting pins to ease into cuts, as mentioned above Again, powerfeeder is really usefull, way safer and much better cut. I use a vfd on mine to slow down feed for highly figured hard maple and such. Could go on and on, but that would be another thread.

    BTW, the worst injury I've suffered was from some 6" x 8" x 5' pine veneer press cauls leaning up against the wall. Had one slide off the wall and crush my thumb against the one I was holding. Wow, did that hurt, but then when I looked found it had torn the meat wide open! Holy shit! Midnight of course, lesson there! Emergency room doc sewed me up, stiches right thru the thumbnail. Healed, but big pad of scar tissue right where I hit the 5th string of the banjo, lost any subtlety I had with my playing.

    There was some humor to the event. I didn't want to drive myself to the ED, so I called my daughter who lived close by. She couldn't leave her kids alone, so I called my girlfriend, lived 25 min away. Meanwhile daughter called my ex-wife who was also close by. She comes and takes me to ED. Girlfriend shows up 20 min later, asking for me, nurse gets horrified look on face - I'm in there with "the another woman" - knife fight! Not uncommon in urban hospitals. Girlfriend (now wife) laughs and re-assures her. All's well, except for thumb. Oh, and then later I go to see eminent hand surgeon, named Dr. Mitten. You can't make this shit up!

    Bottom line - you work with wood machinery & tools, somethings gonna happen at some point. But knowledge, experience, intelligence and quality machinery he.lp with the odds

  10. Likes Trboatworks, henrya, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  11. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    10

    Default

    Followed this thread closely, as I have 15-plus years experience as a professional woodworker, AND ALSO experience using "garage tools" to get the job done.

    All the advice about flat smooth table & fence surfaces is excellent.

    The plywood push stick is a great design, similar to my typical one.

    I would also always argue that the fence SHOULD NOT be parallel to the blade (you never want to engage the "far side" teeth coming up out of the table) --- on a 3' long fence, the outfeed side should be ~1/64" - 1/32" further from the blade than a perfect parallel line. ::Edited to add:: This slight deviation from perfect parallelism in relation from the blade has effectively zero effect on squareness or accuracy of cuts, even when using the Wadkin mentioned below at the full 4" cut capacity, checked against Starrett squares.

    With these three "safety" features (plus a robust Rube Goldberg linkage that allowed foot, knee, hip, or hand access to the emergency off switch), and good training, but ZERO guards, myself and all the crew stayed safe for 12 years using (among others) a 1950's Wadkin direct-drive table saw ----- 18" blade, 3/16" kerf. That thing was a beast! and very intimidating at first, but all the advice about tuned up machines, smooth surfaces, etc., made using it totally non-dramatic.

    On the other hand! My Father-in-law's old Craftsman garage saw, at 1/10th the HP, was always terrifying. Noisy, full of vibration, terrible tolerances, big gap between blade and table. However he knew no better, having never used anything resembling a cabinet saw. After using it reluctantly for a few projects, I convinced him to go halves on a Unisaw. At first, he thought we should safety up and add whatever guards we could to this much bigger more powerful machine ---- but after one use he saw the light ---- the quieter, heavier, more powerful saw is actually far safer as it allows a calmer approach, and as others have mentioned, you are more able to pick out "wrong sounds."

    Stay safe out there!
    Last edited by AckshunW; 07-28-2021 at 02:00 PM.

  12. Likes richard newman, henrya liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •