How do I fix or replace this integral spindle/bearing/waterpump type saw arbor?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    USA NW
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default How do I fix or replace this integral spindle/bearing/waterpump type saw arbor?

    I'm rebuilding a cast iron topped table saw, I've successfully gotten everything down to bare steel and am prepping for powder coating. I'm stuck with this shaft, I assume I'm looking at a bushing with two bearings on a shaft, but I cannot for the life of me get it apart. If anyone has any ideas on technique or tool for the job, I'd be very happy. Here's pics:











    Where it was in the assembly:




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    41
    Likes (Received)
    4262

    Default

    I don't think you get it apart. It looks like the bearing and shaft is an un-repairable assembly intended to be replaced in lieu of repair. Take it apart and you'll probably mangle the ball separators.

    Automotive water pumps are made the same way. The inner races are ground into the shaft and the outer race is the stationary sleeve. Between are the two sets of balls spaced with a snap-in retainer. On one end is the pressed in cap, the other, the seal.

    How does it feel? The bearings OK? Does it feel lumpy? Does it growl when you spin it? Does it leak grease? Can you find a part number, a replacement? If so, I bet it aint cheap.

    Alternative? Mod the existing bore in the housing (If there is sufficient material) and make a new shaft using 200 series bearings.

  3. Likes JohnEvans, Paolo_MD, Newman109 liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Akron, Ohio
    Posts
    747
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    314
    Likes (Received)
    107

    Default

    It's an integral shaft bearing. It does not come apart.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cottage Grove, MN 55016
    Posts
    7,647
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4117
    Likes (Received)
    4563

    Default

    Probably have better luck asking this in the Woodworking forum. The end with the 2 holes looks like a frost plug. Try to pry that out and see if there is a snap ring or nut under it. After you remove the fastener, try to press it apart. Rich
    Last edited by Richard King; 07-30-2015 at 05:51 AM.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    near Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    5,538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    441
    Likes (Received)
    2070

    Default

    Look up cam follower bearings... May be something there...

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Western Nebraska USA
    Posts
    177
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    31
    Likes (Received)
    98

    Default

    it an assembly and it doesn't come apart. They're actually called "water pump bearings". Motion Ind. carries them and if you can find a number on it they can be ordered/cross referenced.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    93
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    48

    Default

    Why not order the OEM part. The machine does look very old.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,052
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4131
    Likes (Received)
    3869

    Default

    I think you have enough answers to proceed. Basically you need to research part numbers, and find what off the shelf water pump assembly was re-purposed for your machine; or bore the housing to fit a new one that is otherwise a close match for the purpose (has the same diameter and length shaft extension)

    If any part of that has failed, every other surface will be degraded so even if you can get it apart and replace with new loose balls, it will not likely eliminate all play, or last very long.

    So, your machine is reparable. But it will take anything from a parts swap, to a slight, to a major rework of the existing casting and systems. We can repair junk machines to better than new for twice the price because we are machinists.

    The title of this post is not really within the rules. (no clear explanation of the subject. Could be doll parts)
    The machine under consideration does not look like one that would meet the rules.

    I'm curious what you come up with, so not locking yet. Makita combo machines IMO are also junk, but the iron was fair, just really crap/less than home-owner quality drives; ostensibly marketed to "pros" (lol). So a good answer could help others. But you need to read and comply with the rules or take it to a hobbyist site.

    smt

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    USA NW
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    Here's the update, I'm including everything I've learned for the next guy. Consensus is that it's an integrated shaft bearing specifically a water pump bearing, though stud type cam follower bearings appear similar and more commonly don't have the shaft protruding out the back. Here's a nice cutaway I found of an integral shaft bearing:



    I did seek out OEM information unfortunately I ended up with this:



    Upon seeking part 176 you get this:


    I went to a local bearing supplier and $16.00 later I've got this matching water pump bearing as a starting point. I need to shorten the shaft on both sides, thread one end and cut the groove for the retaining ring.


  11. Likes Paolo_MD, sfriedberg, stephen thomas liked this post
  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,052
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4131
    Likes (Received)
    3869

    Default

    I think this could be useful to others with some "decent" Jaanese machines (marketed as high end and pro, though that is a stretch) with good iron such as the tables and castings. It could also help those of us who can'r resist incessant tinkering, modification, and out right builds of various machines and accessories.

    I changed the title to reflect the subject and possible future searches.

    smt


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •