I could use some ideals on how to chop down a trim ring.
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,366
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1933
    Likes (Received)
    2137

    Default I could use some ideals on how to chop down a trim ring.

    All- I am on a nice older large Swan which has badly eroded teak trim rings around the deck hatches.
    In the course of restoration the sand down cut through the lap joints in the corners exposing glue joints so the client wants a teak cap placed over to renew.

    Like this- the inner vertical band is veneer ply and cannot be touched:

    swan.jpg

    I made up a router guide to run on the vertical and mill down the trim:

    swan2.jpg

    This did not work- router too heavy to keep guide in line registered against vertical, depth not held as router rocks over etc etc:

    swan3.jpg


    Any ideals?
    The best I have is to redo the router fence ideal with a trim router so I can hold onto the thing.
    The fence has to be round as to run the radius of corners.
    I just need to cut down the existing ~3/8" and drop a new trim ring over (glued and screwed to boat).
    The interior cannot be touched- hatch bolts down on that plane....

    Any fast ideals short of chainsawing a deck section out and bringing into shop where I can bring real tools to bear??

    Thanks all

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    150
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    30

    Default

    Are you trying to get below deck level, or are you going to have a seam between the deck and hatch visible? My first thought is a plywood guide that would clamp over the hatch, and a coller on the router to follow the edge. I assume depth of cut is important on the outer edge and horizontal edge is less important on the inside because it will be under the hatch and won't be seen. If you are going below the deck surface the outer horizontal edge would also be critical.

  3. Likes Trboatworks, stephen thomas liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,366
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1933
    Likes (Received)
    2137

    Default

    Ah- of course!

    Not below deck plane- just need to cap existing ring maybe 1/2" of new stock or so.
    I will have to see if I can get some means to clamp down a ply guide template but you have got it-

    "Why the hell didn't I think of that".......



    Edit- I have a bunch of heavy lead pigs- I can just weigh the crap out of the ply to hold in place.
    Only problem is if I have clearance to deck hardware to lay the ply...

    Thanks!

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    150
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    30

    Default

    Clamp, wedge, cut, flip, and repeat.image.jpg

  6. Likes Trboatworks liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    Posts
    1,100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    801
    Likes (Received)
    423

    Default

    Other suggestion is to use your current fixture but add a long base to your router base so it bridges the hatch. Looks like you will have to trim the base to exactly the right length because of what ever that white thing is your picture.

  8. Likes Trboatworks liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,036
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4126
    Likes (Received)
    3859

    Default

    If the hatches are similar, or perhaps even if they are not, I would use kb's idea of top pattern, but also a 3/4" thick "plug" under it.
    IME, one would trace the "plug" to fit the opening and make it carefully. Screw another sheet of ply on top of that to make the working pattern, and use a collar to run the router around the plug and cut this top sheet to be the working pattern with your next collar and bit set up. Alternately, of course, you can make the working pattern "perfectly" first, and then rout the "plug" to it.

    Tamp it in the hole, if it is loose, have someone underneath put some shims around the edge. If too tight, well that is what rabbet planes or side planes are made for.

    One of these patterns also then becomes the pattern for the trim ring pattern. I love routers, collars, offset pins, shop made guides and a good master pattern!

    smt

  10. Likes Trboatworks liked this post
  11. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,366
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1933
    Likes (Received)
    2137

    Default

    Kudos to all- you saved my bacon and I was able to knock this out.
    Made me feel a bit dense but got me on the right track...


    Soooo.....

    I rolled with Pattnmakers plan- I had a number of various sized hatches to do and one setup allowed me to chop the fixture down as I did smaller hatches and clear deck hardware etc:

    hatch.jpg hatch2.jpg

    Not for the faint of heart... but it got the job done:

    hatch3.jpg hatch4.jpg

    The normal excitement of routing through hidden stainless screws and the like.
    A warning- kids don't try this at home-
    The guide post has stock captive between it and the router bit- a moment of inattention and things could get hairy real fast..

    All in all worked great though- I was trying to force it otherwise to get the guide pin to work as the only register and feeling like I was going to get chipped by the router horsing it like that.

    Thanks again all..

  12. Likes stephen thomas liked this post
  13. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    Posts
    1,100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    801
    Likes (Received)
    423

    Default

    Good to hear it worked out. We used to use long baseplates a lot. A rib on the top for to stiffen it up is often useful as well.

    Hope you priced a router bit or 2 into the job I often price a router bit or sawblate into the quote on rework for those hidden screws. nails, steel dowels etc.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •