I desperately need a roll around tool cart. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    To echo others - go vertical. The first step is a riser on a cart, that allows you to put the small delicate items above the fray, and to work on the main level, while increasing the cubic storage without increasing the footprint.
    Attachment 330583
    I stumbled onto these Basnik carts at auction and liked them so much I bought more new ones. I have all manner of carts built and bought used, these are the only ones I've liked enough to buy new. In effect these can become 'Where things get put away" and a workspace cart at the same time. This one is mostly workspace.
    Note the fast food trays on the bottom shelf, they are great for gathering up a bunch of clutter and moving it, then rapidly bringing it back when the space crisis is over. Also keeps ballscrew balls from rolling away, etc.
    Attachment 330584

    This one is mostly storage. Full of chick vise stuff, it stays in one spot but can be easily moved to where needed, or just to access the machine behind it.

    Attachment 330586

    This one is both storage and workspace, the middle shelf is clear to receive WIP and raw material/bar stock and it is easily moved when needed to access the machine behind it for attention (cleaning or service).The rest of the stuff there is waiting for permanent space to be made somewhere, in the meantime it's not in the way and can easily be moved en masse when needed

    Attachment 330585

    These carts are terrific for a place to put "in process" tools for temp storage, they combine the storage space of shelves and the utility of rolling carts. There's no wall space left here for shelves, this allows the 'shelves' to be placed where you couldn't put permanent shelves, allows you to bring the shelves to the work, and lets the rolling cart BE the 'place to put things away'.

    I've also seen custom racks built for them to hold long items vertical, hooks for hose belts and cables, tubs for liquids, etc.
    I have several of these carts in different configurations, some with posts for hoses and one for clamps.

    Here’s a couple examples, I know there’s more than one manufacture of these?

    McMaster-Carr

    Kevin

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    I buy cheap 4 drawer . . .

    smt
    Forget the gray 4-drawer storage cabinet in the foreground, Stephen. Tell us about the red one with the big casters in the background . . .

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  5. #23
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    TR,
    I have only one roll around cart in my wood shop, but my shop is rather large. I use that cart for wood parts mostly and occasionally as moveable storage for tools/misc items. I just took a normal 4 wheel dolly and made an all wood open structure above. You can sort of see it in the background of the first photo. It is just four posts and some plywood, so quick to build and strong enough for quite a load of wood parts. I have raised the posts for keeping the parts on the top shelf and then a set of cross shelves below that, then an open space for long parts the same direction as the top shelf and then more cross shelves below.

    With a bit better design you could have a lot more storage on the bottom shelf. I like storing wood on wood rather than steel and find steel in the wood shop does not sit well plus it is too slippery. I also have three lumber carts that I use for larger material but those don't work well for tools etc as they have the "tippy" aspect of the Lineberry cart design but they are fabulous lumber carts.
    Another helper I have is a decent sized low bench with a solid wood top, maybe 20" wide by 60" long, possibly longer I would have to check. It is very handy for working on jobs and handy for tools when working on large tables that take up my whole bench. It does slide around fairly easily but also sits where you put it and cannot be knocked over and you would have to bump it pretty hard to knock tools off. Sawhorses and plywood work but as temp storage they can be hazardous.

    I copied my wood cart design for the metal shop and made two carts for the metal shop out of 1.5" aluminum with almost the exact same design but a bit smaller which works very well. I just found a photo of the AL cart so you can see that design. I like the wood tops in the metal shop as it is again not slippery for the metal parts. I can fill these up so they are hard to roll around as the casters are not very heavy duty. I really like these carts and they are in constant use for parts, tools and many other tasks. I should really build two more of these for the wood shop as they are so good and the size is perfect. Too large of a cart becomes a liability and you end up parking it in one spot. These are small and agile so they get used and are easy to use.

    Also a pic of my low bench being used for chair assembly. This bench migrates around the shop constantly and it would be really fun to have a stop motion video of it moving around for a year or so, just pics of the bench every two days so you can see what it does but who has time for that! I actually have two of these benches but you can see the second one in the background was used to make another taller bench. On the left is my largest and tallest bench at 36" tall. Then the middle bench at 34" tall and the low bench is 24" tall. I have fold up saw horses that are also 24" tall and use them occasionally with the low bench as required.

    To respond to earlier comments about flat surfaces, I agree they are magnets for stuff. My tools do not get used for "stuff" and remain clear to be used at any time. It does take some effort to keep them clean at all times but the convenience when needing the tool is worth the effort and reduced aggravation. I can't imagine having to clean off my sliding saw every time I want to use it, it would be too aggravating. I have seen shops where that is the norm with bench spaces being the worst of all with nary a spot to put down a screwdriver.

    I am happy to provide dimensions if anyone is interested.


    cart.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails lowbench.jpg   alcart.jpg  

  6. #24
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    When I stood up this shop building I had drawn up what I though was a decent shop space and it had a bench running pretty much right around the whole shop with storage cabinets below and the center out feed table/bench.
    Over the years the perimeter benches have been slowly but surely torn right out till all I have is the center table.
    I have one 40" long bit of bench left which has the heavy sewing machine on it- that's it..

    screen-shot-2021-10-03-5.48.45-am.jpg

    The shop did spiral out of control for a bit there- I remember at its worse it has two walls just packed with debris about four feet deep.
    Remarkable really thinking back- I cleared it out when I expanded the shop and was amazed how much more room I had even before I moved the walls out lol.
    I found odd things I never remembered stashing away like a larger Dickerson diesel bulkhead heater buried in the mess..

    Now the shop is honestly in pretty good shape but I am still finding I need just a bit of space nearby to where I am doing work.
    For the metal lathe I don't have a tray top so set out a stool by the lathe and set the calipers etc on that.
    My the mill I set out things on the tooling cabinet beside it.
    By the pattern makers mill I am now staging on the ribbon sanders table beside it.

    The worse offender is the middle table- I work with the metal lathe and two band saws behind me- they all become staging areas for the stuff I need to get off the table.

    I am getting there but I really need to tweak ready tool storage just a bit at work stations.
    "Go vertical"- good advice among others.

    In immediate plans is a tooling rack behind the lathe and a tooling cabinet behind the pattern mill.
    And... two carts.
    The shop is a work in progress even after all these years..

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsg View Post
    I have several of these carts in different configurations, some with posts for hoses and one for clamps.

    Here’s a couple examples, I know there’s more than one manufacture of these?

    McMaster-Carr

    Kevin

    Those do look like the Basnik carts, the spindles look like some I have. I have seen others that look the same but are just enough different to not interchange parts, like being 2" wider for example.

    There are other choices for vertical carts that TR might find locally used, like Bakery carts or the wire racks sold at Costco, if high weight capacity is not needed.
    It's SO handy to be able to just dump some stuff onto another surface when needed and reclaim when needed. My vertical bandsaw is right behind the operator of one engine lathe, the table becomes a work surface when running the lathe. If the bandsaw becomes needed, you just sweep all the mics and such onto a fast food tray or 2, plop that onto a rolling cart shelf temporarily, then bring it back when done with the saw. It's real handy to have chest height shelves nearby when working on a machine, roll it near, reach behind you to park multimeters and tools in it, roll it away if room is needed, roll it back when the tools are needed.


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