I made some wooden thresholds out of Ipe and it was a pain
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  1. #1
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    Default I made some wooden thresholds out of Ipe and it was a pain

    3/4" Ipe on edge on the table saw at 10 degrees sorta like a panel raising cut, of course i burnt the hell out of it, there has to be a better way. I do not want to do it by hand, and i do not have a shaper. The router route is not an option either, 3 HP router to swing a 4" bit does not seem like fun. The cut is quite deep about 2 and 7/8 and to hold the board in place one needs feather boards on bow ends which tend to pinch things....source of smoke.

    Would it be better to use a stack dado? it seems to be a lot stiffer than a ripping clade, but it also would take more power to run. I have a 3 HP Unisaw. Good thing is that i have enough for now, but if i need to make it again...i want a better way.

    dee
    ;-D

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    Maybe use an angled sled that can be run through a planer that has carbide knives(carbide absolutely necessary). The stock is clamped into a receptacle on the sled which holds it at the right angle and presents it to the cutter.

    Slower speed knives so less/no burning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtaylor View Post
    Maybe use an angled sled that can be run through a planer that has carbide knives(carbide absolutely necessary). The stock is clamped into a receptacle on the sled which holds it at the right angle and presents it to the cutter.

    Slower speed knives so less/no burning.
    Duh. I could even make some moulder knives i have a planer moulder, not a stellar one it is a Jet . but works. Did not think of that.

    dee
    ;-D

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    just a shim under the work get's the lions share off in the planer. Double stick tape is your friend!
    If you need a "step", that takes a saw or a moulding operation.

    I just ran an 8 degree thresh in oak through the planer today. piece of cake

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    If I were doing that on my saw, I would use my 10 tooth rip blade. Less tendency to burn than any other blade I have.

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    You can make a u-shaped "sled" out of plywood that fits over the sides and top of the rip fence, the stock is clamped to this rip-fence sled, and the sled+clamped stock fed thru the blade. The inboard vertical board of the sled may be made higher for easier clamping and better stability. In emergencies you can also screw stock to the fence or various auxiliary blocks, and if doing a lot of parts, toggle clamps can be added. This is also much safer than feeding the stock by hand, will pull out mild cups in the stock, etc. A good quality thick (not a thin-kerf blade that are so popular) coarse tooth combination blade or rip blade is best--thick for stability (if you were doing all 4 sides like a raised panel, the combination blade is best since that is a ripping/crosscutting type of cut). I keep chunks of paraffin lying around to lubricate such fixtures, table/fence, blade and stock. Cheers.

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    thanks for everyone's reply. made a sled, cleaned up the saw marks in the planer. Life is good.

    dee
    ;-D

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    I know you've got it sorted now, but for the "next times", a scarfing jig and a router will do it, too. Used in boatbuilding for long tapers to join lapstrake and conventional planks, and other elements longer than available stock. Googleable.

    Chip

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    When I made some thresholds out of oak, I used a router with the appropriate bit and made repeated passes exposing a little more cutter with each pass. Worked like a champ.

    Rick


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