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  1. #21
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    You can't insult me Bob, I appreciate all the information. Lots of very good advice here, just the kind of comments I was hoping for.
    There's a lot more here than I've shown. I'm just been showing the exotic, (to me), industrial woodworking equipment.
    For example, I don't even know what these two machines are. In the first picture the front machine has lots of pneumatic lines on it. Maybe a copying machine of some sort? Maybe the woodworking version of an automatic screw machine? The second picture is a side shot of that machine.
    Back to the first picture, the long green machine behind the pneumatic has at least 5 or 6 electric motors on it. The gray cabinet at the far left is the electric control box just for that machine. It has a lot of wood stacked in front of it and I couldn't get a good picture of it.
    I need to investigate that more.

    Again, thanks for the suggestions and I'll update this post when I know more.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_4508.jpg   img_4550.jpg  

  2. #22
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    I can also reflect on the market for some of this equipment.
    I recently picked up a LASM combination edge sander.
    The machine is still in production and retails for about 18k.
    I found one for $1200 which had seen little use and was thrilled to find it.
    I was the only guy interested it seemed though and the seller was happy that I showed up.
    A 1200lb three phase sander is just not a hot item for the vast majority of home and small shops.

    There is lots of value in the smaller items- clamps etc but it all takes time to sell.
    Maine is a bit off the beaten track as well so that is working against the family.
    Around DC a decent announcement and home shop guys would descend like locusts and carry off the small gear in a weekend.
    Up there.. I’m not so sure.

  3. #23
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    From the photos posted, this is not even close to home shop stuff! This is serious commercial and industrial equipment, plus some specialized stair building gear. I'd be wanting to talk to people who are familiar with that world. Contacting IRS seems like a good idea, altho I don't know if they are trustworthy. Interestingly, at some of their auctions stuff goes for peanuts (like the one smt is watching) but others bring much higher prices. Not sure if its the condition of the machines or the geographic location. You might also take a look at woodweb, lots of stuff listed in their machinery exchange section Woodworking Machinery Exchange at WOODWEB

  4. #24
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    You are talking to the man who paid $6000 for a broken Buss planer, and now can't get $3000.00 for it, after it has been rebuilt. Bob
    Bob, we all go there despite or maybe because of our best efforts.
    I don't want to remember how much $ & effort are in my Diehl lumber jointer.

    Any way you look at it though, most of these machines are a steal even at higher prices if you need the asset.
    Sometimes discouraging finding the next guy who really needs it, not too far away, when the time comes to sell.

    smt

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  6. #25
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    IRS Auctions - Lot Listing


    3ea 36" bandsaws brought about what i expected.

    2 ccomplete Oakley edge sanders multiple x what i would have imagined - sell yours quick!
    Even the Oakley missing parts also sold repectably.

    Pin router, about par for the course. Sometimes they go higher. Can also fetch more if dealing with a person who can vouch for it - bearings, pneumatics, belt, etc.

    smt

  7. #26
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    Thanks for the link Stephen.

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    Those machines look like they are all nice and well maintained. If you have time to post them on various woodworking sites and Craigslist, you should be able to do better than the IRS auctions, even a lot better. But it takes time unless someone is looking.

    Good luck.
    smt

  9. #28
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    So far the comments on pricing look reasonable. Regional differences can account for a lot.
    Those are very fine heavy industrial machines in pretty good condition even with the rust.
    The previous owner had very good taste in machines.

    I would think the pin router would go for close to scrap if that, kind of like a metal shaper, old technology and not something a serious shop would buy, easier to go with a cnc machine. Price it low and sell to the first interested party!

    The tilting spindle should get $3000 every day of the week with the power feeder included. More if there are drawers of tooling too.

    I have never seen a 14" wide vertical belt sander like that one, very cool and desirable. I would have it any day over a large disc sander. Way longer belt life and equal material removal rate across the belt width and easy to change belts.

    The clamps that are with the stair jig are from a large rotary clamp carrier, Buck Bros, Taylor or some such brand. They are excellent clamps but not worth a lot of money each, $10-15.

    The custom made stair jigs are not worth much except in a rare case of good luck but you never know.

    I agree with the comment on a video of the machines running, very useful sales tool. Hopefully there is power still connected in the shop?

    I would definitely start advertising these machines on CL across the whole state and word will get out quickly. Decide on prices for everything, write them down and do not negotiate unless the machine has been sitting with no interest for xx days or weeks.

    I would never use a large re-seller of machines, nothing in it for the owners. With all the online places to sell it is not that much work to reach a large audience. You could even email pics to all the local wood shops.

    Lifting and moving the machines is always a concern for a buyer. If you don't have a way to lift the machines then you could suggest to buyers that they all get together and pay a rigger on a certain day to come and move and load machines and split the cost? Might work?

    Good luck,

    ps, I have that exact same shelf unit with all the little drawers, holds a lot of stuff and I use it every day.

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    Thanks MM for more great information.
    And thanks to everyone else that has posted, it's much appreciated.

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    Ex Factory prices are high. IRS auctions used to low but not so much now when you include the premium and a rigging charge. The SCMI 16WA is in the 2500-4000 range if running and has the outrigger and overhead guard and scoring. The edge sander can have a wide range. If in good condition 2500-3500, if unknown, 1000 as they are a pain to rehab. Pin routers and mortisers go cheap. I agree with the Griggio at 2500-3500 including feeder. If it has a tenoning table, a little more. There was a Stenner on Woodweb some time ago and there is a Robinson now which might give you an idea. Prices for heavy stuff can range 1000 depending on location of buyer. I factor shipping in my offers unless I really want something. Dave

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    Is that a weinig or wadkin moulder behind the double miter saw? Thing with all the air lines, as you said?

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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    Ok, it's a Weinig moulder, what model?
    The resaw is nice, shaper is nice, nice mortiser, waterfall sander.

    Tooling with a machine is key.
    I pay a lot less when I am only able to be told it was running, yeah everything was running at somepoint...

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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    Well a few months have gone by now. The owner is thinking about going with a machinery reseller.
    Does anyone have any thoughts about Machinery Associates in Hudson New Hampshire?
    Again thanks much.

    Woodworking Machinery For Sale, Used and New.

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    There's a lot of valuable equipment in those photos and in the background. You're just on the wrong forum/website. Woodweb is a good place to list equipment if you want to sell things one at a time. That's how you'll realize the best value, but you'll have to do some work. If you have the time, sell one piece at a time. If you don't, Ex-Factory and IRS both deal in Woodworking machinery liquidations. You pay for their expertise, though.
    This equipment is fairly late model and well maintained commercial machinery. It is far from being a candidate for scrap. If you need a quick value for legal purposes you could try looking at the insurance policy that covered it. Somebody at one point assigned a value to the entire shop no doubt. That has nothing to do with the actual market value, but it is a number that may be useful.
    If you aren't greedy, there are plenty of potential buyers out there. The question is how much effort you are willing to devote to selling by yourself vs working with an auctioneer/broker.

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    If there is a Weinig molder there in the background, I have a friend in the market right now. Please post a photo if you can. There are probably nameplates on all the motors, but if you can find a nameplate for the machine with the model, year, etc. that would tell us what you have.

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    The machine in front is a "pickle machine", a common name given to a stair stringer trencher. They were first made by John Pickles Company long ago, and the name stuck. It is a specialized stair building equipment that automatically mills out the side stringers to accept the stair treads and risers.
    From what I can see in the photos, this shop did more than just make stairs. The stair equipment is very specialized, but much of what is pictured is solid wood processing equipment of very high quality, and in demand by medium size commercial custom millwork companies.

  18. #37
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    Thanks for your input WPVT. I'm not sure yet about the Weinig. If we don't go with the dealer in my link I'll definitely let you know.


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