J.A. Fay & Co #1 bandsaw
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  1. #1
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    Default J.A. Fay & Co #1 bandsaw

    Hi All!

    Just posting pix of the J.A. Fay #1 bandsaw I've rescued:
    20190825_124041.jpg20190825_135310.jpg
    Blasting off the loose paint... and there was a bunch. Many layers.

    Before anyone asks...
    I purposely chose NOT to strip this old gal bare. Why? Because there's original paint under all that. If I strip it bare, then when someone comes to do a proper historical restoration, they'll have no link to how it was originally finished.

    I'm just restoring it to a working, preserved machine. It will be returned to use, albeit occasional and avocational, not daily commercial/professional... rather than retired and relegated to the great crucible in the sky, I'm it's home and protector, it'll get a non-particular coat of primer and color, so that it's iron is protected from environmental attack.

  2. #2
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    Default Under the layers...

    Under the layers, are patent dates and manufacturer's name:
    20190825_153209.jpg20190825_153213.jpg

    J.A. Fay & Co, Cin. O.

    and

    Pat. June 16 1868
    Sep. 19, 7 Nov. 14, 1871
    May 21 1872
    & May 19 1874
    Reissued Aug 25 1865

  3. #3
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    Default With primer on...

    Here's how it looks with a little protection...
    20190825_153222.jpg20190825_172947.jpg20190825_173000.jpg

    Notice the ornate wheel spoke detail and the iron finial?

  4. #4
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    Nice!

    Interesting that the upper and lower wheels are different....

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveKamp View Post
    Here's how it looks with a little protection...
    20190825_153222.jpg20190825_172947.jpg20190825_173000.jpg

    Notice the ornate wheel spoke detail and the iron finial?
    Beautiful, just beautiful.

    Paul

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    Hi All!

    Yes Neil- it is strange that the upper wheel is ornate, and the lower is plain. I've looked at photos of other #1s, and they're exactly the same. I'm certain there's a reason, but at this time, I can't even venture a guess as to why.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveKamp View Post
    Hi All!

    Yes Neil- it is strange that the upper wheel is ornate, and the lower is plain. I've looked at photos of other #1s, and they're exactly the same. I'm certain there's a reason, but at this time, I can't even venture a guess as to why.
    In that era designers would put details on things to please the eye as well as for practicality.

    RR station: https://stephentravelsdotcom.files.w...ior2.jpg?w=761

    Bridge: Redirect Notice

    Eiffel Tower: Fileetails of Eiffel Tower structure, south pillar.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

    Eiffel Bridge: Some Great Work of Well-known Civil Engineer GUSTAVE EIFFEL in Europe, #Post1 | mrleenote

    Locomotive: https://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/24101...ce_387_184.png

    Paul

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    What are the four round ...things on the table? That upper wheel is a thing of beauty.

  9. #9
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    Regarding the difference in wheels, this is not unheard of. It is thought that the designers of that time sometimes believed that the driven wheel should be lighter weight than the driver wheel.

    This model Fay band saw--of which I've seen catalog cuts, illustrations and photographs of examples--was one of the most ornate of the 1870's band saws.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RODELU View Post
    What are the four round ...things on the table?
    Hee hee... that's penetrating oil.

    Underneath the center of each one of those spots, is a threaded hole, where from beneath, bolts attach the table to it's gimbal base. I cleaned the holes out with a small round wire brush in a cordless drill, with some oil sprayed in... and what you see, is what was flung off the brush.

    I've made some more progress on this sweetheart, whilst also doing similar on a 1917 15" South Bend Model 34... both will be carefully secured to forkliftable pallets and moved into my pole barn for storage. To protect the sensitive surfaces, I've mixed up some beeswax/linseed oil/turpentine, and brushed it on hot, to put a nice protective cover on it. Prior to doing so, I scrubbed and lightly sanded the tabletop to cut off some welding spatter that got on it many years ago. Fortunately, there's no pitting to any of it. the wax has done a formidable job at keeping it nice, even with condensation appearing every morning, it just can't get to the metal. ;-)


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