Komo Machine - Anyone here know their history ? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 35 of 35
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    51,310
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2799
    Likes (Received)
    5617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    It would break the bank to heat that place. At leas this winter has been mild here in MN. It was in the 50's yesterday. Normally it's closer to -20° this time of the year.
    Right, that's why I wonder what they do in that regard. Sometimes when folks rent spaces in large open buildings they put up a wall of tall chain link fence to keep renters from one space venturing into their space and then perhaps adding clear plastic for some heat retention....but if no other renters I'll bet these guys are doing nothing to heat the machine areas. Might be like HGR surplus, where it's often colder inside the building than it is outside !

    How far are you from them ? I'm dying of curiosity what it actually looks like in there....maybe you could go and see ?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pillager, MN
    Posts
    5,731
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1868
    Likes (Received)
    5226

    Default

    Well, I'm a hermit and don't venture out of my backyard shop very often. But if the stars align,I may be heading in that direction to look at a forlift soon(with the next week or so). Sauk Rapids is on the way. I'll let you know.

  3. #23
    rollmaker Guest

    Default

    You abviously found out they are still in business. I talked to the individual who worked at Gusmer's for years before they shut down. He said that Komo
    has about 25 employees and is involved with these machines and some foam
    spraying equipment. Knowing soe of what went on with Gusmer, I was
    suprised to hear that there was some activity.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    51,310
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2799
    Likes (Received)
    5617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    It would break the bank to heat that place. At leas this winter has been mild here in MN. It was in the 50's yesterday. Normally it's closer to -20° this time of the year.
    I got my router in yesterday and talked with the trucker who delivered it. When he picked it up at the old Komo building, was able to back all way in and load/tarp inside. He said there was no wall for their space and they (SNX) were heating the entire building... but only to 50 degrees or so. SNX is occupying the end the office space is at.

    The pleasant surprise is that I didn't get the 2008 machine they showed in photos but a newer demo manuf in Jan 2011 ! Even has Komo nameplate rather than expected SNX nameplate. Milltronics 7200 control still has the monitor protector plastic film in place. Not sure what to think about where it was actually made, as most electrical components, fittings, spindle motor, etc are European. However the linear ways are not the usual THK but some make I've never heard of in Taiwan. There is an 8 kva transformer at main power input made in China, but that's the only Chinese item I notice. I thought the tool change motor was Chinese at first due to some chicken scratch labels, but it is made in Japan by Panasonic. Axis motors are Yaskawa (Yasnac)

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    KOMO is a major player in aerospace, aviation, marine and construction industries. Over 3,000 installations in the U.S. with major aircraft companies like Boeing & Cessna and major Boat manufacturers using KOMO. Mostly high-end, high speed applications. Please don't compare Haas with KOMO. Two very different machines and therefore not competitors.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,497
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    115
    Likes (Received)
    840

    Default

    Not sure where Komo routers are made today but as of last year the major weldments were done by Park Industries. Northwood beat Komo to the stone industry by a mile and Komo never had a chance, produced very few stone CNC router machines. Park Industries is a major US manufacturer of stone sawing/routing/water jet machinery and prob agreed to do the weldments as long as Komo got out of the stone business. I know many of the Park people and that is where that info came from.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,497
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    115
    Likes (Received)
    840

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BA in Tampa View Post
    KOMO is a major player in aerospace, aviation, marine and construction industries. Over 3,000 installations in the U.S. with major aircraft companies like Boeing & Cessna and major Boat manufacturers using KOMO. Mostly high-end, high speed applications. Please don't compare Haas with KOMO. Two very different machines and therefore not competitors.
    About 10 years ago I talked with a Komo tech who installed several of those huge profilers in China. Story was when he got there the machines were outside and under tarps. There was also a huge forklift there that unloaded them. He told the plant people that the machines needed to be inside. The plant manager rounded up a huge mass of workers and a lot of heavy rope and they dragged the machines into the plant by manpower alone. He said it did not take long either.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,938
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    216
    Likes (Received)
    349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy887 View Post
    About 10 years ago I talked with a Komo tech who installed several of those huge profilers in China. Story was when he got there the machines were outside and under tarps. There was also a huge forklift there that unloaded them. He told the plant people that the machines needed to be inside. The plant manager rounded up a huge mass of workers and a lot of heavy rope and they dragged the machines into the plant by manpower alone. He said it did not take long either.
    Why didn't they use the forklift to lift and move or drag the machine

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,497
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    115
    Likes (Received)
    840

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Why didn't they use the forklift to lift and move or drag the machine
    That was what I was told. Tech said that did that to impress him. Did not want to waste fuel for forklift when their plant has a bazillion workers.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Park Industries no longer provides the weldments for the KOMO CNC Routers. Also, like many U.S. companies they have brought all their manufacturing back from China. All manufacturing is out-sourced in the U.S. and all the CNC controls are Fanuc.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,497
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    115
    Likes (Received)
    840

    Default

    Cool. I'll be seeing many of the Park people in Vegas late April.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pillager, MN
    Posts
    5,731
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1868
    Likes (Received)
    5226

    Default

    KOMO made nice routers, but horrid VMC's.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,684
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    187
    Likes (Received)
    466

    Default

    They made HUGE universal vertical mills. The biggest issue was the fast travel ballscrews they used from what I hear and the goofy Fanuc version...and maybe the toolchanger but other than that...lol.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    456
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Let me shed a little light on this subject, as I used to work for Gusmer when they closed down & moved ( of which we had to pack things up to lose our jobs) & I currently work for Komo in the same building. Phil Kamens is the sole owner of PMC (Pacific Manufacturing Corp). In the early 1990's I believe is when he bought Gusmer. I think he bought Komo around 2002 also. In late 2004 Graco bought Gusmer from Kamens, but just the business, not the real estate. Gusmer/Graco layed off about 125 employees in 2005 and said it was just getting lean and was staying in NJ, also gave us stocks. 1 month later said "no stocks for you" & was breaking up Gusmer & moving it to their other divisions. Some to Minneapolis, to North Dakota & most of manufacuring to the new plant being built in New Canton Ohio. 12/31/06 all the rest of us at Gusmer/Graco were laid off( except a handful -to close building, HR,etc). Meanwhile PMC hired ex-gusmer VP Mike Kolibus and PMC moved their spray division into the ex Gusmer building which was still owned by Kamens. Ironically they call this PMC also, but this stands for Polyurethane Machinery Corp (PolyMac for short). Real imaginative huh? In 2008 PMC moved Komo manufacturing to China. Big mistake as everything got screwed up-blueprints,parts,assembly,etc. In 2010 PMC moved everything into the same building with PMC (Polymac) in NJ (where Gusmer was). I just recently started with Komo but we are probably over 50 employees now and getting busier. They are hiring more. The pay is pretty low, but in NJ manufacturing sucks so there isnt alot to choose from. So Gusmer(now Graco) does not have any ties to Komo. Komo & PMC (PolyMac) are sister companies.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Mid-00's KOMO History

    Late to the party but I worked for Komo in the mid-00's. By the time I was hired, they were making machines in China and they told us these were for the Asian market. Word from people who had been to the Chinese plant was that the people working their were unskilled and cheap. To put it into perspective, the "nickels" or plugs for our vacuum bed tables were scrap stamped steel about 11 gauge that we bought at just above scrap prices. In China, they turned and cut these nickels from round bar stock and were doing it manually for cheaper than we were sourcing the stamped scrap! A delegation from China came through the plant in Sartell Minnnesota in 2007 and they had never seen the handheld deburring tools we were using, rather they were still using files or table mounted grinders, even on aluminum!

    Our president was also president of another company for our parent company and he was in Minnesota every other week. My understanding was there were concerns with the high initial investment in our machines versus the 3-7% profit margin, and the nearly a year lead time on machines. To make up for the surges in profit, KOMO was selling or leasing it's intellectual properties from automation and refrigeration to prop up our annual revenue. They were done making VMCs well before 2005 and had all of their eggs in CNC routers for Aerospace, plastics, and millwork, and opening up a line of CNC routers for cutting stone, in direct competition with Park Industries of Waite Park, MN, just a couple of miles from the Sartell plant. Both KOMO and Park Industries had employees who worked for the other at some point. The stone machines were not selling well. They were trying to compete in a niche market against an established stone machine company.

    KOMO was also experimenting in lighter automation that complimented the CNC routers, such as loading machines and specialty cutters for trusses. They were developing their Fusion line of CNC routers which were supposed to be able to be fitted into a transmodal container, presumably to ship overseas or have shipped from overseas. The Fusion machines had a fixed gantry base and fixed gantry that were supposed to be able to be attached to the table base at the machine's location. This was innovative and problematic because KOMO had been welding the fixed gantry base to the table base of the machines, milling the base, attaching the fixed gantry to the base and milling the X-axis square to the table base in a large 4 axis traveling gantry machine. They were holding about 0.005-0.010" accuracy over 24' of Y-axis before the precision rails were attached. The Fusion was proving problematic in holding the same accuracy during assembly. (They were machined to tighter tolerances but runout after assembly showed otherwise.) Our aerospace grade machines after final assembly and installation were 0.003" accuracy on the Y-axis (12-28' of travel) for fixed gantry style machines like the Mach II and Mach III. The Mach Is were traveling gantry machines aimed at the cabinet and millwork market. We made a large 3 section traveling gantry for Grumman Aircraft that had 40' of travel and was to be used for milling large panels.

    Another move KOMO made was to sub-contract the frame weldments and they got what they paid for.

    To further complicate things, KOMO was in the process of converting all of its hardware to metric to help it compete on a world platform. This proved problematic for many of the electrical panel components and things that bolted to the frame that were manufactured in the United States like components of positive pressure lubrication system. I don't know if this was ever completed or was just an initiative that died somewhere between engineering and whoever was ordering the components. It certainly seemed like they weren't involving each other in conversations.

    The Mach series of machines were being supplied with network capable GE Fanuc controllers, had HSK style collet system with a 4th axis for controlling specialty tools. They had phenolic tables meant for plastics, woods, and composites using nothing or air for coolant, and aluminum tables for any material. We had one traveling gantry CNC router with a steel table but in nearly 3 years working for KOMO I never saw a steel table manufactured. Cut plenty of electrical panels on light density fiber board resting over the aluminum table.

    Another revenue source for KOMO then was doing contract work for our customers. A lot of this was machining of the product parts they were going to use our machines for, at least until their machine(s) were installed. We also were contracted to make parts for our automation suites we had sold, especially for local firms.

    Until the 1990s, KOMO had a WWII era manual VMC that the whole frame weldment for a KOMO was rotated 90 degrees and hung on a special "wall" to be milled by the VMC with about 30' of Y-axis travel, 12-14' of X-axis (that was vertical) and 4' or so of Z axis, all using dials and gears, with a 4' deep chip pit running the length and width of the machine.

    In the 1990s KOMO partnered with Star machinery of Britain and installed one of their large traveling gantry milling machines. The machine had a 40' table level with the floor allowing KOMO weldments to be placed in from special trolleys, with large t-slots, 13.5' of X-axis, 12' of Z-axis, the operator rode on a platform attached to the gantry. The cutting head was a hybrid 4-5 axis, as it used the same spindle for cutting to articulate the cutting head along the C-axis. It could not be cutting while articulating about the c-axis. The partnership between Star Machines and KOMO didn't go anywhere as neither company was able to use the other's sales networks to get footholds in the respective countries.

    The Sextons who sold KOMO to PMC still owned the building and toured the plant quarterly in 2007. I don't know if they sold the building after, or just leased it, but a couple of years ago I noticed a welding firm, C4 Welding, operating out of the whole building permanently.

    That is a summary of what was going on in the mid-00s. I left when I saw the writing on the wall for manufacturing going over seas. The housing market crash did not help KOMO. China was cheap labor, but it was unskilled labor. No one trusted our parent company, at least until the middle of 2007 they were assuring us our jobs were safe. If anyone is still reading this in 2019 and has a question, I'll try to answer if I remember.
    Last edited by exKomoTime81; 09-30-2019 at 08:42 PM. Reason: Edited for clairty

  16. Likes macgyver liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •