Please help identify wood lathe
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Please help identify wood lathe

    I recently came across this Rockwell 11" wood lathe and caught my attention. I have since emailed owner to find out more about it.
    All he gave me was the Model: 4G140A/83 & Serial# GU554720
    However thats where it stops, I can't seem to find anything more about this particular one.
    Also, I know it's just a little lathe but how is it? is it worth the $250? Can it turn or will I be stuck taking painfully little cuts?
    Any information on this lathe would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Jeremiah

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jshields View Post
    I recently came across this Rockwell 11" wood lathe and caught my attention. I have since emailed owner to find out more about it.
    All he gave me was the Model: 4G140A/83 & Serial# GU554720
    However thats where it stops, I can't seem to find anything more about this particular one.
    Also, I know it's just a little lathe but how is it? is it worth the $250? Can it turn or will I be stuck taking painfully little cuts?
    Any information on this lathe would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Jeremiah
    UPDATE:
    I'm quite sure this model is a 46/140.
    who knows of these and their use, can anyone tell me if its worth while?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    10,996
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4119
    Likes (Received)
    3825

    Default

    Photo would help. Rockwell produced a number of lathes as continuation of companies they took over, such as Delta. (Which before that was Duro) and Walker Turner, not to mention Crescent. Some of the things Rockwell continued to produce were often as good as the originals for a while, or even small improvements. Over time they tended to cheapen up and lighten up.

    Does it look anything like this common (& lighter version) scion of the old Walker Turner's?

    Photo Index - Rockwell International Corp. - Wood Lathe/46-11L | VintageMachinery.org

    Or is it older and more heavily built?

    Also, what are your intentions for a lathe?

    smt

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    This is going to sound stupid but how do I post pic to forum (new here)? Or is it just links?
    It looks identical to the 46/140 or Beaver 3400. I know it's 3/4 hp which may not be enough, I'm looking to do mostly vases and bowls.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    also what are youre thoughts on a 12" craftsman lathe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    10,996
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4119
    Likes (Received)
    3825

    Default

    Craftsman mostly sold a lot of low quality, low end stuff, but plenty of people started with it.
    The Beaver you show is an adequate starter lathe and should work for the stuff you describe until you start making bigger pieces (bowls).
    The spindles are wimpy on all the lathes you've mentioned so far, which doe not factor much when the TS is used.
    For faceplate and chuck work, it becomes limiting.

    I continue to think Hardinge second ops are the best small wood lathes ever made, the split bed versions are usually cheap, and the tooling options for them are limitless. Chisel rests are not common, though, so you have to make your own for them.



    smt


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •