Precision tool case wood types - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    everything seems less stable these days...

    good to have you back Stephen.

  2. Likes neilho liked this post
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    I cannot blame this on the wood specifically, although using wood rather than metal or plastic contributed to the problem. 30 years ago I made a nice stand for router bits from a wide 4/4 mahogany board. I bandsawed about 1/8" off the face of the board, planed both bandsawn faces flat, then Forstner-drilled mostly 1/2" holes in the thicker section, and finally glued both sections back together. This held a large selection of router bits by their shanks quite nicely.

    However, in the early 90's, I stopped doing serious woodworking about the same time I moved to Oregon, and the router bits sat on a shelf in the garage. My furnace is in the garage, but the garage is unsealed, therefore damp in the wet season, and subject to enough temperature swings to cause condensation. After several years of neglect, I found I could no longer get most of the router bits out of their nice wooden stand because they had heavily rusted on just the portions in contact with the wood. The bit bodies and shank sections exposed to the air had not rusted noticeably at all.

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    It's not foolproof - but when i have made boards for bits and such (all my 32mm gang drill bits and chucks, or router bit boards screwed to the bottom of toolboxes for jobsite work, e.g.) I have usually saturated them with LPS #2. Decant the LPS#2 from the gallon can into a catchup-style squeeze bottle/glue bottle. Use that to fill the holes. Let it wick into the wood. Repeat.

    smt

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    They probably would have rusted in any type of case, wooden or otherwise. I tend to oil everything with light oil then wipe it clean when I need to use it. Not everything is used daily, since I am working by myself so it prevents damage from being idle.

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    A bit of a stretch here but Japanese magnolia (Obovata, ho or honoki) is used for some applications where interaction with steel is unthinkable. Not easily obtained but is grown stateside by some. Soft and easily cut but fairly close grained and doesn't leave "fuzzy" surfaces like some other softer woods when cut. I've always wondered if the domestic magnolia has similar properties.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    I cannot blame this on the wood specifically, although using wood rather than metal or plastic contributed to the problem. 30 years ago I made a nice stand for router bits from a wide 4/4 mahogany board. I bandsawed about 1/8" off the face of the board, planed both bandsawn faces flat, then Forstner-drilled mostly 1/2" holes in the thicker section, and finally glued both sections back together. This held a large selection of router bits by their shanks quite nicely.

    However, in the early 90's, I stopped doing serious woodworking about the same time I moved to Oregon, and the router bits sat on a shelf in the garage. My furnace is in the garage, but the garage is unsealed, therefore damp in the wet season, and subject to enough temperature swings to cause condensation. After several years of neglect, I found I could no longer get most of the router bits out of their nice wooden stand because they had heavily rusted on just the portions in contact with the wood. The bit bodies and shank sections exposed to the air had not rusted noticeably at all.
    FYI, I made a plywood case for a 12" cylindrical square a while back, and used felt on the support surfaces ( ~3" concave radius ribs to support the 6" diameter).
    Glued the felt down with standard Titebond on the support surfaces, and gave it a couple of days to cure. Put the square into the box and left it for a day or two, and pulled it out to find some faint rusting on the places where it was contacting the felt. I felt like an idiot. My conclusion was the wood glue still had some moisture in the joint with the felt, although the glue chemistry may have made it worse. In any case, i then u a polyethylene bag as a buffer for contact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    This one's for Stoneaxe,

    "how many toolboxes....."

    Attachment 275592


    Curly Koa floor i did minor repairs to before Christmas.

    smt
    Nice floor, damn nice railing work. I are a metalworker, after all.

    For tool box drawer liners, I like acrylic felt, occasionally spritzed with Fluidfilm (lanolin), also used to undercoat cars. It plays nicely with the contact cement the felt is glued in with.

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    For this kind of application you may want to try something like 3M spray adhesives.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    I cannot blame this on the wood specifically, although using wood rather than metal or plastic contributed to the problem. 30 years ago I made a nice stand for router bits from a wide 4/4 mahogany board. I bandsawed about 1/8" off the face of the board, planed both bandsawn faces flat, then Forstner-drilled mostly 1/2" holes in the thicker section, and finally glued both sections back together. This held a large selection of router bits by their shanks quite nicely.

    However, in the early 90's, I stopped doing serious woodworking about the same time I moved to Oregon, and the router bits sat on a shelf in the garage. My furnace is in the garage, but the garage is unsealed, therefore damp in the wet season, and subject to enough temperature swings to cause condensation. After several years of neglect, I found I could no longer get most of the router bits out of their nice wooden stand because they had heavily rusted on just the portions in contact with the wood. The bit bodies and shank sections exposed to the air had not rusted noticeably at all.
    Cheating is permitted.

    A length of thinwall copper plumbing (Type "M"), flare one end, countersink for it ... and you have yer inspirational wood, plus beaucoup liner tubes that even guide the shank and protect the wood from damage. Same again, many plastics.
    "pill" of felt in the bottom of each hole, saturated with preservative oil, or a spitball of VPI paper, and...

    I tend to just watch the local frugal-store for "Big Sale" on poly, Bamboo, or weird-Asian wood cutting boards, impregnate all Hell out of the the permeable ones with oil rather than water.

    VPI & cousins I snag a packet of pre-cuts, plus a small roll every year or three, put it under the mat, each "active" drawer, another sheet loose-laid, atop for seldom-used goods.

    Not as if I am wearing it 24 X 7 inside a gas mask, so... safe enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by specfab View Post
    FYI, I made a plywood case for a 12" cylindrical square a while back, and used felt on the support surfaces ( ~3" concave radius ribs to support the 6" diameter).
    Glued the felt down with standard Titebond on the support surfaces, and gave it a couple of days to cure. Put the square into the box and left it for a day or two, and pulled it out to find some faint rusting on the places where it was contacting the felt. I felt like an idiot. My conclusion was the wood glue still had some moisture in the joint with the felt, although the glue chemistry may have made it worse. In any case, i then u a polyethylene bag as a buffer for contact.
    Titebond 3 has something in it that rusts bare steel on contact. It makes a real mess of sash cramps unless they are waxed really well.

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    I have read that oak, walnut and mahogany are the worst woods for metal contact. They all have high acid content and moisture in the air will cause acid which will rust any metal in contact. I do not think this is a problem for stuff not touching the wood?
    For what it is worth cigar humidors are made of cedar.
    Bill D.

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    I think no need to stay away from other wood.If you want to use toolcase, then use Toolsbros instead of toolcase. It will be helpful for you.

  14. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I have read that oak, walnut and mahogany are the worst woods for metal contact. They all have high acid content and moisture in the air will cause acid which will rust any metal in contact. I do not think this is a problem for stuff not touching the wood?
    For what it is worth cigar humidors are made of cedar.
    Bill D.
    "For what it is worth".. probably several tens of millions of military and civilian rifles were stocked "predominantlly" with any of several clans of the Walnut tribe - and a few of the Maple tribe.

    Custom sporters have been done in no wood, all known woods remotely strong enough, even if they had to be laminated - plus a few "woods" that never really existed in the wild, but not all that many other woods were used for the "government" ones in anywhere near the unit volume, very dawn of bang-stick age to present-day.

    Rust they can do but the wood, even in directly bedded contact - has not been the worst of offenders in active service nor active reserve training armory storage, either one.

    Cosmoline & sputniks for long-term storage are wot they is, of course.


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