Re-conditioning a big European shaper-spindle molder - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin Rapids WI
    Posts
    578
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    154

    Default

    The smaller bearing can be a sealed due to the higher rpm limit but generally running C3 bearings in a spindle is a cost cutting measure to avoid either an oil distribution system or expensive bearings. A stamped steel cage bearing will seldom be higher precision than ABEC 3 because the cage becomes the limiting factor. The proper top bearing if you can find one is a phenolic or brass cage ABEC 5 or 7 with normal or C2 clearance. Since a large shaper seldom runs over 6000-7000 rpm an ABEC 3 SKF Explorer type bearing in C3 is cheaper unless you find a deal on ebay for the precision one. When running a C3 in a shaper, I'd run the spindle a few minutes before cutting anything to tighten up the runout. I think you will find that warming up the bearings by running them will reduce the runout as the clearance is reduced by the temperature increase. Not ideal but that is why newer shapers cost less than the old ones with large high load bearings in an oil drip system. Dave

  2. Likes stephen thomas liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    1,121
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    236

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beckerkumm View Post
    The smaller bearing can be a sealed due to the higher rpm limit but generally running C3 bearings in a spindle is a cost cutting measure to avoid either an oil distribution system or expensive bearings. A stamped steel cage bearing will seldom be higher precision than ABEC 3 because the cage becomes the limiting factor. The proper top bearing if you can find one is a phenolic or brass cage ABEC 5 or 7 with normal or C2 clearance. Since a large shaper seldom runs over 6000-7000 rpm an ABEC 3 SKF Explorer type bearing in C3 is cheaper unless you find a deal on ebay for the precision one. When running a C3 in a shaper, I'd run the spindle a few minutes before cutting anything to tighten up the runout. I think you will find that warming up the bearings by running them will reduce the runout as the clearance is reduced by the temperature increase. Not ideal but that is why newer shapers cost less than the old ones with large high load bearings in an oil drip system. Dave

    Very informative- thank you!

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    2,118
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    50
    Likes (Received)
    289

    Default

    Becker, (Dave)
    That is excellent relevant info. I have never checked the runout on my spindle but I am going to do some tests.
    Stone,
    Did you get your electrical problem sorted? When I bought my machine many years ago it would not start at all except for a little “burp” of movement. It took me hours to track down the broken link inside the mag switch. It had just enough contact to allow the motor to burp and then nothing, it also had enough contact to show as continuous when tested with a meter. I don’t recall how I fixed it but the machine has been working well ever since.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    1,121
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    236

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M. Moore View Post
    Becker, (Dave)
    That is excellent relevant info. I have never checked the runout on my spindle but I am going to do some tests.
    Stone,
    Did you get your electrical problem sorted? When I bought my machine many years ago it would not start at all except for a little “burp” of movement. It took me hours to track down the broken link inside the mag switch. It had just enough contact to allow the motor to burp and then nothing, it also had enough contact to show as continuous when tested with a meter. I don’t recall how I fixed it but the machine has been working well ever since.
    Not yet- I was poking around in the motor connections and crumbled some old cooked motor lead insulation, so I brought it to a electrical motor repair shop. hopefully they can crimp the leads without having to go all the way back to the windings and then re-dip the thing. They will call with an estimate in a week or two- backlogged like everyone these days.

    I did ask the phase converter guys, who were sure the converter was under powered, which it is- a 10hp rating (to start 5hp) and a 9hp motor.

    However they could offer no explanation why the motor would start and run OK in one direction, or the other, but not reverse. My guess at this point is maybe there is some switching weirdness in the mag brake wiring, and it is not unlatching - it does have two wires going to the terminals, as if the brake was having power applied through two different sources, depending on whether fwd or reverse was switched on.
    I'll figure it out, I sure wish they had spend 10$ more to put a actual door on the electrical panel, instead of having to unscrew a bunch of screws and switches to get into it.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    1,121
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    236

    Default

    Got the motor back with new leads and bearings , all installed. A 30 hp phase converter showed up today so soon there will be enough power to run this thing. then the fun starts- full back fence.

    BTW- anyone have an old large shaper fence? Probably rare, but one never knows. The one with this machine went missing somewhere. I don't strictly need it , but the dust hood would be helpful , as well as a place to mount some pressure rolls.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    2,422
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    191
    Likes (Received)
    1351

    Default

    What you need for any big shaper is a power feed. Keeps your fingers attached to your hands. Better finish on stock as well. If your machine came to you without a fence it may have lived its production life with a rub collar. But proper fence is a really good thing.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    1,121
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    236

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy887 View Post
    What you need for any big shaper is a power feed. Keeps your fingers attached to your hands. Better finish on stock as well. If your machine came to you without a fence it may have lived its production life with a rub collar. But proper fence is a really good thing.
    Heh- Trust me, I have no intention of using a hand feed!

    Debating whether a belt feed or rollers will be best for long linear stock feeding against an outboard fence. Found out there are 5,6, 7 roller feeders out there. Might be good to keep the stock up tight to the fence.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •