Rebuilding a Griggio sc3200b sliding table saw
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    Default Rebuilding a Griggio sc3200b sliding table saw

    I recently acquired a used Griggio sc3200b sliding table saw for a very good price. Only thing is that it was used hard and could use some tuning up and perhaps some new parts. This is my first slider so I am still getting used to it. The first thing that I would like to do is to get the sliding carriage squared up, flat and tuned to perfection. The sliding carriage has some play so I would like to replace the internal and external rollers under the sliding table. I have adjusted them as much as I can and it still doesn’t fix the play. The hardened rubber (or what ever the material is) ways on the top and bottom of the frame are all good. Getting the rollers and pads replaced and getting the sliding carriage tuned and squared up is my first priority.

    Has anyone ever replaced the rollers on a slider? How difficult of a task is this? I have rebuilt a hand full of table saws, jointers and planers but never a slider. I know that I am capable of it, I just need a little guidance from you guys. Are there any other components inside the sliding carriage that I should consider replacing while I have it apart? Also, last thing. If anyone knows of a good source for these rollers that won’t cost an arm and a leg please let me know! This saw was also produced for Holtzher and I am waiting on them to send me a quote for the rollers which I assume will cost an arm and a leg.

  2. #2
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    Has anyone ever replaced the rollers on a slider?
    Yes. Including making/hardening/grinding the ball bearing races, documented on here.
    Usually it is much simpler than that.

    We'd love to help but you need to post pictures and parts diagrams for meaningful advice relating to a particular saw.

    smt

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    Yes. Including making/hardening/grinding the ball bearing races, documented on here.
    Usually it is much simpler than that.

    We'd love to help but you need to post pictures and parts diagrams for meaningful advice relating to a particular saw.

    smt
    Will post pics shortly.

    Someone on another board explained to me how to go about adjusting the rollers on the sliding table carriage and now that I have adjusted them I am getting no play in either full extension, in the middle stationary, or at full pull back on the sliding carriage. With that being said, since I am tearing down the saw to replace a lot of other parts, would you recommend going ahead and replacing the rollers too?

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    would you recommend going ahead and replacing the rollers too?
    Not if they work.
    I personally might try to clean & lube them while out of the saw, though. Most bearings around woodworking equipment seem to fail from packing up with dust until they start skidding. If every individual roller is smooth and silky, it may be better not to mess with them. There's lots of opinions about how and what to use for lube.

    If the saw is used in business and you can find a spare set, it might not be bad insurance long-term.
    Apparently Griggio is out of business?

    smt

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    Not if they work.
    I personally might try to clean & lube them while out of the saw, though. Most bearings around woodworking equipment seem to fail from packing up with dust until they start skidding. If every individual roller is smooth and silky, it may be better not to mess with them. There's lots of opinions about how and what to use for lube.

    If the saw is used in business and you can find a spare set, it might not be bad insurance long-term.
    Apparently Griggio is out of business?

    smt
    Not sure if Griggio is out of business. I believe they went under and where bought and merged into another organization but don’t quote me on that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    Yes. Including making/hardening/grinding the ball bearing races, documented on here.
    Usually it is much simpler than that.

    We'd love to help but you need to post pictures and parts diagrams for meaningful advice relating to a particular saw.

    smt
    One thing that I need to figure out on this saw is why the saw blade becomes noticeably wobbly when turned on? It does fine once it comes up to speed but when it first turns on while coming up to speed it appears to have some wobble. The tilt mechanism is also broken in some way that I haven’t discovered yet. I have it held up 90 degrees to the table top with a large stick of wood and some straps and bracing to keep it from falling down on me during testing.

    I spoke with a former Griggio technician and he said the curved racks that control the tilt are made of cast iron and the shaft/worm gear is made from steel. He suspects that the curved rack needs replaced. It took some research but I found a company with a new old stock curved rack for $475. I would also like to replace the arbor which is another $330 on top of that. I do plan to replace the arbor bearings when I pull the old arbor out. New belts too.

    Do you guys think I should go ahead and replace the arbor or just the arbor bearings? Would blade wobble be more likely due to a bad arbor, or bearings? Wish I could find a cheaper curved rack for the tilt.

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    need to figure out on this saw is why the saw blade becomes noticeably wobbly when turned on? It does fine once it comes up to speed but when it first turns on while coming up to speed it appears to have some wobble
    Is that a 16" saw? Larger blades often are floppy below design speed. They are hammered/tensioned to run straight as the rim stretches at speed.

    That said, if the saw under 12", it might be anything from worn bearings, to bearings loose in their bore or on the shaft (arbor) to resonant frequencies that find an equilibrium at higher speeds (until deflected).

    Use a dial or dial test indicator to check the arbor & inner collar with the power disconnected. Including end float. If the inner collar is not fixed to the shaft, put a "good" spacer against it and tighten the nut or end bold on the arbor to tension it while inspecting the face. Sometimes truer readings can be attained more easily with belts off.

    Collars sometimes need reground, but if the saw runs straight at speed, that is not the primary issue.

    smt

  8. #8
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    The tilt mechanism is also broken in some way that I haven’t discovered yet. I have it held up 90 degrees to the table top with a large stick of wood and some straps and bracing to keep it from falling down on me during testing.
    You are asking people to diagnose your saw with no clear pictures and possibly no in-depth inspection yourself?

    It feels like a waste of time to speculate, but have you verified that it is not something as simple as a sheared pin or key somewhere in the worm drive? Have you looked to see if there are broken or worn off teeth on the sector?

    smt


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