Small table saw that is worth the trouble? - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Bought used 50 yrs ago, came by railway freight, anyone remember those days?
    REA, Railway Express Agency, logo was a green diamond laid over on its side (or fatter than tall, diamond is a diamond I guess) ... there was some red in the logo too, I think.

    No, didn't look it up. They had an office in San Rafael, tracks on the back side, loading dock on the front. Very nineteenth-century, cool.

    The other one that was really useful, fast and cheap was Greyhound. They'd toss the freight in the baggage compartment, went just about anywhere in the US, did I mention cheap ? Limit was 200 lbs I think ?

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    REA, Railway Express Agency, logo was a green diamond laid over on its side (or fatter than tall, diamond is a diamond I guess) ... there was some red in the logo too, I think.

    No, didn't look it up. They had an office in San Rafael, tracks on the back side, loading dock on the front. Very nineteenth-century, cool.

    The other one that was really useful, fast and cheap was Greyhound. They'd toss the freight in the baggage compartment, went just about anywhere in the US, did I mention cheap ? Limit was 200 lbs I think ?
    I’ve used both Railway (Amtrak) and Greyhound for shipping within the last decade. For large objects that are relatively low in weight, like a tuba in a case, their shipping costs are about the lowest out there.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    Of course you are absolutely right, I just hoped someone would have a line on a lighter saw with a decent bearing assembly and a decent fence.

    Would it be heresy to drill a router mount in a Unisaw table?[or Powermatic, as mentioned they are probably better] I have no understanding of the silliness that is my router table fence

    Unisaws can be had for 500 bucks if you keep an eye out, and after I finish with this series of projects I may do that

    I guess I will either design a bench that the saw slides under, or figure out how to integrate the RAS and Unisaw into one space
    Someone already suggested it, but it bears repeating. An 8” Delta Homecraft saw will do everything you mentioned. They have the same design as the later 9 and 10” contractors saw, but they are light and easy to move around. I have one that I use a lot. More than my Unisaw in fact. I put a 1.5hp Baldor motor on it and bought a light weight Shop Fox fence for it (I had to adapt it, because the table on the 8” saw is smaller than the Unisaw or 10” contractors saw). The fence really makes the saw, and very few stock fences have the features that a modern replacement fence have (slot for hold-downs, magnifier & accurate scale, easy adjustment for parallel to blade and perpendicular to table top), rollers, three point clamping for consistent accuracy...). It also has a Forrest blade stabilizer (which virtually eliminates blade vibration) and uses a link belt (which eliminates motor vibration). Another thing I like better about the 8” Homecraft saw is cleanup. It leaves a pile of sawdust below the saw, so cleanup is easy. The unisaw by comparison collects sawdust inside and cleanup is more of a pita, probably because it usually collects until it becomes a problem and you have to deal with it. Yes you can add dust collection, but I hate dealing with dust collectors, I would prefer to work outside and sweep up at the end of the day.

    My Unisaw by comparison has long rails, an outfeed roller table, a three-phase motor and is built into a cabinet which stores all the table saw tooling. The entire saw and cabinet are on a long HTC mobile base, so when I use it I roll it out of the shop onto the driveway, where I have enough workspace to handle sheet goods and do cabinet work.

    Regarding putting a router mount on a Unisaw table, yes, there are lots of possibilities. If you remove one of the cast iron wings, you can buy a replacement cast iron wing that is already set up with a hole for a router and a miter slot. It comes with a purpose-built fence with a dust chute. Or you can make your own out of plywood. That is what I did originally. Now I have a Delta HD shaper which I installed the cast iron router table on, so I can have a setup with two cutters.

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  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Some of the new miter saws (Bosch, for example) now have a parallelogram sort of guide, rather than bars extending out the back. You can get a 12-14" cross cut (and up to 28" flipped) while sitting on a pretty shallow bench - on rollers if needed.

    If buying today, I'd consider (and as a friend just bought) something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-120-Vol...hi&sr=1-3&th=1

    Add a track type saw and that combination would do most stuff. Even the ones that ride on an aluminum angle with a roller-bearing platform for a circular saw are capable of breaking down ply for most home-level cabinet work.
    I have the bosch glide parallelogram saw. I use it quite a bit, but it isn't as solid as a slider with bars, and a slider with bars isn't as solid as a chop saw without them. It"s pretty easy to get 1/32 of drift at the end of a long cut.

    To me, that's worth it for the space savings, but then again I have a CNC router for breaking down sheet doing cabinetry and sheet goods. The Bosch is too heavy to drag to a jobsite and too flexible to do really precise work on. It's great on a bench in a garage for all-purpose work, though.

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