Sump pump electric motor to power lathe?
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    Default Sump pump electric motor to power lathe?

    Recently I acquired a new submersible sump pump. Had already been planning on building a lathe.

    Would it be safe to modify the old sump pump, incorporate a speed control and use the electric motor to power a lathe?

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    This is exactly the kind of thread and the kind of user that should not be allowed on this forum anywhere. This is a professional forum. I class this thread the same way I class the "What color should I paint my clapped out BP or SB?"

    To the OP, your question is stupid, please go away.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    This is exactly the kind of thread and the kind of user that should not be allowed on this forum anywhere. This is a professional forum. I class this thread the same way I class the "What color should I paint my clapped out BP or SB?"

    To the OP, your question is stupid, please go away.
    You sir are an a-hole. I'm sure you started somewhere as an amateur and eventually evolved your abilities.

    I figured asking here might be wise in case I missed something in my thought process.

    I plan on eliminating the propellers and turning that into a head stock and welding the cast iron body together to make it solid for use.

    Main thing I'm milling over is how I want to keep it from overheating during use since it's originally intended to be submerged.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratisse View Post
    You sir are an a-hole. I'm sure you started somewhere as an amateur and eventually evolved your abilities.

    I figured asking here might be wise in case I missed something in my thought process.

    I plan on eliminating the propellers and turning that into a head stock and welding the cast iron body together to make it solid for use.

    Main thing I'm milling over is how I want to keep it from overheating during use since it's originally intended to be submerged.
    It doesn't matter what you think, the site owner has spelled it out pretty clearly.

    FWIW a submersible pump needs water for cooling, and a "speed control" is usually just a SCR in a chopper circuit, thereby dropping the average voltage.
    Only to be used on brush equipped universal motors.

    If you would have taken qty (5) minutes to look around before posting, you would have seen your question has been asked & answered several times before in the electrical section.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    It doesn't matter what you think, the site owner has spelled it out pretty clearly.

    FWIW a submersible pump needs water for cooling, and a "speed control" is usually just a SCR in a chopper circuit, thereby dropping the average voltage.
    Only to be used on brush equipped universal motors.

    If you would have taken qty (5) minutes to look around before posting, you would have seen your question has been asked & answered several times before in the electrical section.
    I get everything you said. I was asking before designing an enclosure to cool the unit.

    As for searching, I had popped in "sump pump lathe" and roughly 250 threads came up. I went through 25 of them before I decided to post my question.

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    Ratisse I admire your fortitude and matter-of-fact non-confrontational response.

    Q does belong in the Electric motor section.

    If you are doing woodworking, we'd be glad to have you.

    FWIW, i make purpose built contraptions out of scrap, surplus, and stupid parts sometimes to effect high end millwork.
    If you make good woodwork with it, please check back with pix.


    smt

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    Delighted to see you posting, Stephen.

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    How about a hermatic pump from the beer cooler. with the right seal and a JB welded on shaft you could turn stuff and cool the beer in one step? Maybe make a vertical lathe, leave the pump in the hole and run a shaft up. you need to be thinking about dual purpose use.

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    Thanks, Pete.
    Enough of your inspection tooling here that i give you a thought from time to time.
    Hope the health continues well.


    smt

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    Safe ..perhaps but not the best idea.
    QT: [a new submersible sump pump motor is a special purpose motor and so best to be kept or sold for that use. Likely a common motor would be best for building a lathe.

    Also good to have a ground wire in an electrical device so a three prong plug.

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    Trade the sump pump for a treadmill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratisse View Post
    I get everything you said. I was asking before designing an enclosure to cool the unit.

    As for searching, I had popped in "sump pump lathe" and roughly 250 threads came up. I went through 25 of them before I decided to post my question.
    I did a quick search on that and saw nothing about using one to POWER a lathe. I did see threads about using one to pump coolant.

    I agree with those who have suggested it may overheat if run in air instead of submerged. If you are building a DIY wood lathe there are far better choices for motors. Years ago I built a lot of stuff using repurposed motors from old washing machines.

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    To the OP: Build the lathe, do some "interesting" work on it, come back for show 'n tell.
    That's enough for now on the sump pump motor.

    smt


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