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Thread: The Tenon Jig

  1. #1
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    Default The Tenon Jig

    Hello all,
    As promised in another thread I am posting a few pics and some dimensions of my custom tenon jig that uses a plunge router and a template to cut very accurate tenons.
    Not only is it accurate and easily adjusted but it is super fast as well which is a real bonus.
    Another great feature is the ability to move the template in relation to the clamped workpiece in order to position the tenon exactly where you need. This is done very quickly with a small inexpensive x-y drill press vice that clamps the template and allows adjustment in two axis.

    The construction is all very simple joinery and I used Baltic birch plywood for the main cabinet and some Jatoba solid wood for the face frames. I took some extra care when cutting to ensure a very square and parallel centre space as the workpiece clamp swings outward so you can do angled tenons as well as compound angled tenons if you add an extra angled fence. Any mis-alignment here would cause problems with the tenon accuracy.

    The basic premise is that the pin on the right side of the router plate rides in a close fitting groove which constrains the movement of the router and acts as a pivot point so the template guide pin can move around the template easily.

    Some may have noticed that this is quite similar to the Leigh MFT and it is, with a few key differences. The main difference is that the guide pin is tapered and the template has the matching 30° angle. The tapered pin allows a very fine adjustment of the tenon thickness and easily compensates for a sharpened cutter.

    So I will post the pics and continue with the commentary in the next post. 93a5e9c7-9b11-47d1-ac35-28540a027487.jpgfa23d108-26ac-4b7c-ad37-fb9cb4a3506e.jpg08ad6fde-4c42-47db-9a3c-c8d30d07bfd8.jpge9af81b7-e242-4268-802b-84e7d583c9ea.jpgdf9218dd-b795-4340-a3d5-22bae2680e09.jpg

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    Some dimensions for the curious and for anyone that wants to build their own. It is well worth it and changes the way you think about joinery.

    Overall dimensions are 16” tall, 33.5” wide and about 12” deep. None of the dimensions are critical and you could scale it any way you like. The vice needs enough room for adjustment and that is the smallest one I could find at the time.
    The left side with xy vice is about 11.25” wide, the middle is 10.25” and the right side is 12”. The workpiece clamp assembly is a nice sliding fit and is clamped in place with two T nuts in a block and a knob through the side gable with corresponding curved slot.

    I will post more pics of that assembly after I take it apart. You may have noticed the wooden dowels that are used as the hinge pins and that is to save the router bit if you get too close to the edge.

    The router is only constrained by the pin and slot so it can travel a large area and you can actually destroy your own jig if you are not careful but you will never ruin a tenon!
    I can cut 100 tenons and put the first tenon back in the jig, recut and it won’t remove any material. I think that is pretty good for a jig made mostly of wood.

    The templates are a critical part of the jig and while there is a lot of adjustment for tenon thickness with the stylus guide pin I made several common sizes of templates to make it easier to adjust for the final size. One thing that happens when adjusting the stylus is that the length of the tenon also changes so minimizing that adjustment is helpful and I cut template stock for 1/4”, 5/16 and 3/8” tenons so I can just cut a piece to the required tenon length as needed. The goal was to have each template sized so that there was minimal adjustment of the stylus when swapping out templates and cutting a different tenon thickness.

    The stylus has a fine thread and a quarter turn of adjustment takes off or adds about 3-5 thou iirc. It is very easy to get a perfect piston fit of tenon into mortice if your mortices are consistently sized.

    This jig was made for a specific job many moons ago, 14 arts and crafts dining chairs with compound angled tenons and lots of rails. I think it was in the range of 280 tenons that needed to be cut. After three days of jig making it took 2 days of cutting to get the job done!

    I never had to adjust a single tenon by hand after cutting, they all fit perfectly. Not only that but I had made quite a few chairs up to this point and these were so easy to assemble and clamp as the joints were perfect and the assembly was square and level after clamping.

    That was version 1.0 and this jig pictured is version 3.0. The main difference was the addition of the xy vice which made it easier to adjust the template.

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    Thanks for the detailed information. Looking forward to the next installment! Is there a way to make the photos any bigger?

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    I, too, can't really make out what the pictures are showing. But if it works the way i think i've imagined, it is quite clever. The router pivots at one end? and basically works like a linear profiler? (only on the end, instead of the side, of a work piece).

    Do you climb cut to prevent blow-out at the shoulders?

    How the heck do you add copes or miters?

    Have you ever tooled, set up, & used a regular tenoner?

    It's fascinating enough i could be intrigued to make one out of steel.
    But then i think simply making an all-tilting, micro-adjustable Y-Z axis stock holder for the tenoner table might be more productive. OTOH for chairs primarily, your set up easily allows a shoulder all the way around a tenon without a secondary op, albeit so long as only a square shoulder is required.

    I found with the new photo regime that the best size for photos seems to come from dialing the quality down to about 25% (On my Nikon photo editor) and then adjusting the size by setting the long dimension (pixels) and letting the program set the short dimension to match. I iteratively bump the long dimension until the total package yields somewhere between 90 - 97 KB. Within a family of photos, those settings can then generally be used unless one or more were originally cropped considerably differently from the others. Per John O's advise and coaching, the best results for me seem to come from loading the photos to albums in my personal file, and then linking them [IMG] address [/IMG] to the text. That format also makes it easier (IME) to position photos in the text rather than using the clickable minis at the end of a post.

    All that said, this forum has become the worst of any of the 6 or 7 that i post to. (2 or 3 aviation, couple antique chainsaw, another wood site, and AZBilliards) PM has become the least intuitive, most cumbersome and time consuming, least quality, and poorest reproduction values. "It didn't useta be that way" either. Wonder what the decision to complicate and degrade the photo system was because it really tamps down participation. Maybe that was the intent?

    Thank you for making the effort - your jig has a lot of potential apps for end work besides just tenons, and could even be commercially viable.

    smt

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    Sorry about the small photos, the system just resizes them automatically.
    If anyone wants larger images to inspect just PM me your email and I will send you the photos.
    I am also going to take a video of it making a tenon and link that through Vimeo.

    Next instalment later today and answers to questions, got to get to work now...

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    I will try and post the pics as Stephen has outlined, for now I will answer some questions.

    “ used a regular tenoner? “
    Yes, a long time ago I bought and restored on of the smallest size tenoners. I set it all up and it worked but it was fussy to adjust and for chair work it was too difficult to make offset tenons and it didn’t cut the shoulder so that was a second op. It worked ok for some cabinet door setups where the tenon was the same size as the dado in the door stock. I also found it quite difficult to sharpen the curved cutters, not to mention the slight danger of working so closely to large exposed cutterheads.

    I sold it and made tenons on the tablesaw for quite a few years until I made this jig. Which dovetails nicely with your question about copes or mitres. It doesn’t do either but there might be a way, I have never had the need so didn’t put any thought into how it could be done.

    ” do you climb cut?”
    Yes, the majority of the cutting is easily done by climb cutting as you have full control of the cutting action and if the cutter starts to pull it also moves away from the workpiece reducing the effect. I almost always take a conventional pass as a finish pass just to make sure I haven’t missed a spot. I also use a solid carbide upcut spiral bit which works very well.

    ”the router pivots at one end?”
    Yes and the round guide pin slides in the groove which allows it to cut up to an 8” wide tenon.
    The geometry that occurs with this setup is quite interesting and not intuitive, well at least for me anyway.

    I made up my first template with square ends and promptly cut a tenon with angled ends. This was actually helpful as I just measured the angle created and then cut a new template at that angle. The long front and back of the template are parallel with the pin groove as one would expect. Dialling in the template holder so it is parallel with the work clamp surface is an important step and I am sure I could do a better job now that I have more experience with machining setups and dial indicators.

    The capacity of the jig or max size of the tenon is limited and that is mainly due to the plunge depth of the router and the available length of router bits. To get a bit more length out of a 2” cut length router bit I ground the shank a few thou under so I can take two or three passes and increase my tenon length without rubbing the shank on the tenon.
    I would have to check my stash of chair parts but from memory I think the longest tenon I have cut is 2.5 inches. It was actually for a bridle joint where a chair leg joins to the crest rail. You can see those chairs on my website and they are my favourite chairs.
    Most tenons for chair work, general furniture or cabinet doors will be easily accommodated with a tenon length of 2” or less. I happen to have a very nice chisel morticer so square ended tenons are the desired output of my jig but round ended tenons are possible and the jig could be used to cut mortices as well.

    I have made and sold four or five of these jigs to local cabinetmakers and one owner wanted to make round end tenons and the problem is how to cut the template. The solution was to mount a router where the stylus is located and cut the template in a reverse action setup. A round end tenon of the desired size was mounted in the jig and a 1/2” smooth steel dowel mounted in the router, then the template was cut with the second router to create the unusual shape of the template. A round dowel template could also be created this way which might be a very useful shape to have.

    Stay tuned for more info tomorrow and hopefully better photos.

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    Great looking jig Michael! I really like the idea of using the taper on the template and pin for fine adjustments. I think I understand how it works, but just to be sure, here are few questions:

    Looks like the ratio of template size to tenon size is 2:1, yes?

    Could you make your round end tenon templates by turning and splitting a tapered dowel and attaching it to the ends of a rectangular template?

    How much clearance do you allow for glue? I found that with that kind of accuracy, what feels like a loose fit can be way too tight with glue on the surfaces.

    When I made furniture I cut my mortises & tenons on my Bridgeport with a horizontal head attachement. Not fast, but ever so accurate, and I loved being able to take controlled climb cuts to eliminate any breakout. I see that your jig can do that also. These days I only use tenons for shop fixtures, cut the cheeks on the bandsaw and shoulders on a Hammond Glider.

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    Richard,

    "template size to tenon size 2-1? "

    Not exactly, there is a ratio but I never calculated what it is as I just cut the templates as needed. It would be great if you wanted a 1/4" thick x 1" wide tenon and your template was 1/2" x 2", but it is not. A lot has to do with the size of the tapered stylus or guide pin and where it is located on the template. In order to have some adjustment in both directions you have to start somewhere in the middle so you can go up or down from there. I will have to check the measurements on the actual jig to confirm but I think the stylus is about 1/2" long and I chose to have it fully exposed below the movable router plate. I then made the templates so that there is about 3/4" of taper above where the template clamps into the vice. In practice I don't need much adjustment as I explained earlier I made sets of templates for the different sizes of common tenons. So I can swap out a 3/8" x 1.5" long template for a 3/8" x 2" template and I don't have to change the stylus as the fit will be the same.
    If I do have to adjust for fit then it is usually just a quarter or half turn of the stylus to make a snug or loose fit.

    "turn and split a tapered dowel...?"
    That sounds appealing but the shape on the end of the template to make a round ended tenon is not circular, you would be surprised at the shape. Because the router moves horizontally while it is moving foreward or back the shape is quite odd and doesn't look like what you would expect. It has to do with the geometry of the distance between the template stylus, the guide pin and the router bit. The router bit is offset from the centre line of the guide pins as well which adds to the quirkiness of the setup. In order to have the guide pin and the stylus located behind or in back of the workpiece so that the front of the jig was a flat plane I had to offset the router so it was not in line with the guide pins. If all three lined up then the workpiece would have to be inset into the jig and I wanted to be able to cut a mortice if I ever needed that feature. I also added two other positions for the stylus by drilling and tapping two more holes just in case I needed to cut a larger workpiece and needed more offset. In practice I have never had to move the stylus from its middle position, well maybe once.
    You can see the offset in the photo showing the bottom of the router plate that shows the stylus on the left and guide pin on the right.

    "how much clearance?"
    Now you have opened a can of worms with that question and I think that might be a good topic for a whole new thread! With a good mortice you can get piston fits with this jig but that might be too tight for the glue as you mentioned. The glue can grab quite easily if the tenon is too tight and then you are really stuck, can't get it to go in and definitely can't get it out. I think your question calls for a bit of testing with the digital calipers and some test fits to find out just how many thou make a difference to the fit. I like to have just a bit of resistance as I slide the tenon in by hand and it won't fall out on its own. If I have to tap it in it is probably too tight. It also depends on the size of the tenon as smaller tenons need to fit a bit tighter IMHO.
    When I am setting up and cutting the first tenon of a batch I make a mortice first and then fit the tenon to the mortice. I always prep the mortice as I would do for each mortice after cutting on the chisel morticer which can leave a slightly rough surface so a quick cleanup gives me a good benchmark for all the rest. I then make a test tenon and adjust to fit the mortice, I actually don't usually measure the tenon at this point I just adjust until the fit is correct.
    This reminded me of an old saying that I was told many years ago, not sure if I remember it right but it goes something like this in relation to the fit of a tenon...."If you need a hammer it is too tight, if you can use a feather it is too lose, if you can use your hat it is about right."

    Cutting tenons on a bridgeport would definitely be accurate but it sure would be slow! I had very little metal work equipment when I made this jig and did not have access to a milling machine of any kind. How things have changed in 20 years. I did mention earlier how fast this jig can cut tenons but until I show it in a video I think most woodworkers don't actually believe the speed when I say it is fast. Even if it is not set up I can walk over, select a template, set the stock in the clamp, adjust the template position to the required offset (or centred) and make a cut in less the 2 minutes. Then I may have to adjust to fit the mortice and once set I can cut a complete tenon in 30 seconds or less. Perfect shoulders, perfect fit, eight tenons or 100, angled or compound angled the cutting time is the same, setup time a bit longer.

    I often need offset shoulders for chair making, top shoulder (or cosmetic shoulder) is 3/8" and bottom shoulder is 1/4", so I need to cut always with one face against the machine for consistency and also the front and back shoulders (structural shoulders) could be offset as well. So then I need to adjust the template after rotating the workpiece which is quite easy and fast, just dial the template over the right amount and good to go. It takes longer to type this than to do it on the machine.
    When I am test cutting I usually just cut down only 1/16" or less to see where I am at and then adjust and check again. I will often do this on finished workpieces as the tiny little cut will not make any difference once glued together and I am usually so close that it all disappears anyway.

    Looks like I could write a book about this jig, usually I am not so talkative.....by for now.

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    Thank you Michael for such a detailed reply, it's much more complicated than I thought. I'm going to have to do some sketching to understand what's going on, but clearly you've got it well figured out. Looking forward to seeing larger pix and maybe a video if you have more time to invest.

    As for me, I suspect I could cut all the mortises and tenons I'm going to need for the rest of my career (such as it is) on the Bridgeport in way less time than it would take me to even begin such an engineering project. That's the sad thing about old age, hard to justify investing in jigs and gizmos, except maybe for the joy of building them.

    Oh, and about clearance for glue - I did some testing on that for splines we used in joints between solid wood lippings and lumber core veneered panels for table tops. Somewhere I probably have the magic numbers, but I recall the we got maximum strength with a pretty loose joint - maybe .006" to .008", which feels really sloppy. I also recall when I taught at RIT 40 yrs ago, a student did similar tests for his thesis, with dowel joints. Again the strongest joints were surprisingly loose.

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    The method got me thinking about pantographs and Thomson tables.
    Then i checked eBay and suddenly they are asking high $$$.
    Oh, well, when mine were acquired, each for around $150 it would have made sense.

    Thomson table for direct 1:1 copy and proportion. Cut off one wing, bolt an extension sub-plate to the T-slot table, and let the router poke through the sub-plate off to one side. Mount unit onto tilting table with stock vise/hold downs.

    Gorton pantograph for any ratio desired between about 1.5:1 & 12:1.
    Mount CI knee to table with tilt/swivel stock vise hanging over end.

    Gorton (or other panto) would be the most flexible set up and adjustment option. But it would require a spindle change for tenons much longer than 1" due to small collets.

    There is a Deckel on ebay starting under $100 though....

    smt

    PS, no criticism of OP. Nice solid design.
    Just musing out loud what could be rigged up quickly tinker-toy style for "instant gratification"
    Won't reconfigure mine unless a job comes in that suggests it - I use them for metal work too often.

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    Richard,
    How old is old? I feel really old some days.....

    It took me about a few days to design and build the prototype but it is all worked out now and the main part could be done in an afternoon. The guide pin and stylus are very simple. A piece of 1/4” or 3/16 AL plate should be easy to source and a cheap xy table can be had at Harbour Freight I would imagine.
    There is some pleasure in the making but the real joy is in the using, every time I cut a tenon I smile inside and feel lucky to have a jig that makes woodworking enjoyable and profitable.

    My guess is that with PVA glue a tight fitting joint will wipe off most of the glue and possibly starve the joint. With mortice and tenon assemblies I always put glue on the tenon and in the mortice, more in the mortice than on the tenon, I really hate having glue squeezing out everywhere. The trick is to put just enough on that it covers well and just barely oozes out in a few spots.
    On a few entry door tenons I have had the glue hydraulically squeeze out of cracks or worm holes which is also a great technique if you need to get glue into an impossible location. As long as there is room to drill for a dowel you can push glue into a crack and then apply the clamps.

    Stephen,
    I remember thinking about a linear way carriage for the tenon machine as that was before I knew about Thompson tables, now I have three of them. The weight and a bit of drag created by the AL plate is quite helpful in guiding the router around the template and in freehand cutting of the tenon. Most of the cutting is done freehand until you remove enough material so the stylus can ride on the template.
    The main benefit of the stylus and bevelled template is the fine adjustment of the fit of the tenon, no other machine has this capability. ( I think) Also the fast and easy adjustment of the position of the template in relation to the workpiece is hard to replicate with other designs or adapted machines.

    Just imagine a tenon with the back shoulder 3/8” and the front shoulder 1/4” and setting that up to cut on the tablesaw with a tablesaw tenon jig. Not too big a deal, now angle the tenons and make lefts and rights, now we have a problem. Not so easy on the tablesaw! Cutting a complete shoulder in one setup regardless of the workpiece angle or tenon location is quite magical.

    The only machine that I can think of that does something similar is a Ballestrini tenon cutting machine. These are quite large and expensive but are made for production so I am sure they work well however I have never used one or even seen one in person.
    I also think that they only cut round ended tenons but I may be wrong about that.

    Hmm, lunch is almost over, time to get back to work......

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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Moore View Post
    Richard,
    How old is old? I feel really old some days.....
    74 Michael... and you?

    It isn't just about how age affects your body, it's mostly the realization that your time left on the planet is so short. The question is how you want to spend it, old habits just don't serve anymore. A lot of formerly important stuff can seem pretty pointless from this perspective. Not a bad thing, actually it's kind of a relief, like finally getting off a bucking horse.

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    Richard,
    Just a kid at 54 and already I am thinking about the time left and not wasting it.....

    Does a woodworker ever retire, no they just keep finishing!

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    Does a woodworker ever retire, no they just keep finishing!
    Some days it does feel like i took a shellacing.

    smt <-----much older than Michael, not as much younger than Richard as i'd like to be.

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    Hi,
    Nice work on the tenon jig.


    You are correct about the Balestrini machines; I had a set of mortise and tenon machines for many years, I got them about 30 years ago. Excellent machines. Made for high production, but with a little tweaking you can turn out excellent joints. The models the I had were the 2CAP mortiser and the 2/TAO tenoner. the design of these two machines has changed considerably in the newer versions. The model that I had only cut round end tenons.
    The tenoner was a brilliant design, that utilized a conical tracer in a variable jig similar concept to what you have done. The tracer was on the same shaft as the cutterhead, Tracer on one end cutterhead on the other. the shaft was mounted in a spring loaded pivot arm, so that it was always pressed against the template guide. the template had adjustable radiused ends. This setup gave you the ability to adjust your tenon from a perfectly round dowel to any length up to maybe 4" long, by the the adjusting the depth of the conical tracer into the template you have an infinite adjustment to the tenon thickness and radius From 1/8" up to 1- 1/4" and depth to a little over 3" The template is adjustable through ninety degrees from horizontal to vertical, giving you the ability to have tenons cut at any angle in between.. The tenon position is set by the table height and mitre fence.. The tables are also tiltable and have a mitre fence giving you the ability for complex compound angles. The cutterhead has adjustable scribing knives for super clean shoulders, and adjustable chamfer cutters for the tenon ends. These machines are twin table machines so you can work continuosly, loading one piece while one is being cut. Brilliant machines! The mortisers are also great machines. You cut the mortises first as they are governed by the mortise bit size, then you adjust the tenons to fit perfectly to the mortise. The model 2/TAO tenon machines had moving tables; that is the tables moved into position for the head to cut the tenon, the newer versions have fixed tables and the head moves from one table to the other to cut the tenon. The newer machines have made a lot of changes to the design, I am not familiar with the newer models, so I don't know anything about them. I recently got one of the newer models, the model TO it was the one that followed the 2/TAO, I haven't hooked it up yet, so it should be interesting to see what hey have done.

    tenoner.jpg

    094.jpg
    bal_2tao_80.jpg

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    Hennebury,
    Thanks for the write-up on the Ballestrini machines. I had seen a video or the manufacturers info on these but wondered how they achieved the magic. I am curious how the spindle is able to travel around the template and how the spring pressure works all the way around the template. Obviously they solved both problems.

    Very cool that you now have the newer model. When you get it set up can you post some pics and or a video of it running? Can the new machines cut square ended tenons? You must need to cut a lot of tenons if you have a Ballestrini!

    I will hopefully get a video done soon of my machine and post it here.

    Michael

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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Moore View Post
    Hennebury,
    Thanks for the write-up on the Ballestrini machines. I had seen a video or the manufacturers info on these but wondered how they achieved the magic. I am curious how the spindle is able to travel around the template and how the spring pressure works all the way around the template. Obviously they solved both problems.

    Very cool that you now have the newer model. When you get it set up can you post some pics and or a video of it running? Can the new machines cut square ended tenons? You must need to cut a lot of tenons if you have a Ballestrini!

    I will hopefully get a video done soon of my machine and post it here.

    Michael
    Hi Michael, the Older 2/TAO tenoners really are magical; A brilliant design! The spindle is mounted on a pivot arm inside a large drum/ cylinder which rotates inside another cylinder, It is quite amazing. I found a couple of photos online; not the best but you can see a bit of what it looks like.

    In the first photo;
    In the upper left you can see the large outer cylinder with the yellow grease cup. inside that is the spindle, which protrudes down into the template that I did the drawing of. You may be able to see the conical tracer on the spindle end that engages with the template. just above that you can see the green pivot arm. then just above that you can see the Vee-belt that rotates the inside cylinder. At the top left you can see the cutterhead end of the spindle and the Vee-belt that drives the cutterhead.

    My rational for having them is quite simple; I wanted to do the best work in the most efficient way.
    The are industrial machines capable of doing 900 tenons an hour, and 600 mortises and hour. So they are rock solid machines. They are built for speed, I don't need that output, and wanted a higher quality finish on the joints. But when you tune these machines, slow the feed rates down, increase the spindle speeds etc you can turn them into high precision machines that do 200 or more joints an hour with perfect accuracy and precision and super quality joints. Still amazingly fast for a studio craftsman. I gives you unlimited design potential when the number of joints is not a concern and the quality is guaranteed to be the best you can do.
    When you consider the return on your investment of getting used industrial machines and fixing them up, it's a no-brainer.
    Other then that they are they are fun to use; nothing beats stacking up a bunch of parts for a set of chairs and and cutting precise joints as efficiently as these machines do, what a fun way to spend your day.

    As far as i know, the newer tenoner is also only for round end tenons. I had considered at one time getting some square end template for the old tenoner as i believed that it would work fine considering the way the machine functioned. But it would have been a big job to change them over, and I needed it for round tenons. I will update you when i get the newer tenoner going.
    I don't really have a lot of mortise and tenons to make as I am semi-retired, but I want to make a few things, and kind of got used to having nice equipment to work on.

    511601014_w640_h640_511601014-1-.jpg

    511601023_w640_h640_511601023-1-.jpg

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    Henneb,

    Excellent info all around with good photos.
    I knew the Ballestrinis would have an interesting mechanism to do the cutting but it is way better than I thought.
    Interesting that you can cut a 3” long tenon, for some reason I thought these were limited to 2.25” or 2.5”.

    Maybe more will come up for sale now that CNC has taken over and who needs a Ballestrini anymore?

    You are spot on about fixing up old machines. I am pretty much done upgrading my wood shop but still upgrading machines in the metal shop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Moore View Post
    Henneb,

    Excellent info all around with good photos.
    I knew the Ballestrinis would have an interesting mechanism to do the cutting but it is way better than I thought.
    Interesting that you can cut a 3” long tenon, for some reason I thought these were limited to 2.25” or 2.5”.

    Maybe more will come up for sale now that CNC has taken over and who needs a Ballestrini anymore?

    You are spot on about fixing up old machines. I am pretty much done upgrading my wood shop but still upgrading machines in the metal shop.
    Michael, The old machine had a 3" depth of cut the newer ones only have a 2" or so like you said; Sometimes the newer machines drop some of the features that are important to a few, for the newer features which appeal to the majority of users, so i am a little nervous about the newer tenoner that i have just got, as i really liked the features of the old one. So it will be interesting to see what changes they have made.

    I would certainly recommend that you keep an eye out for a set of these machines. if you do chairs especially; But you can find many ways to use them in all sorts of furniture. You won't regret owning a set and will soon realize how nice it is to have them at your disposal whether, you need to do a couple of dozen joints or a couple of thousand, either way they are efficient. I did all of the joinery for 300 bunkbeds sets for a company, piece of cake for me , almost impossible for them to do. The machines paid for themselves in a couple of days. Lots of possibilities when you have the equipment.

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    Hey Guys,
    Finally got a video done of the tenon jig in action. Lets just say I am not a Utube star and leave it at that.
    My editing skills are zero so I made two videos to show off the features.
    I kept things very brief so I am sure there will be questions, fire away!
    In the second video I show some chair parts and you can see the finished chairs on my website. MichaelMooreFineWoodwork.ca
    It is my favourite chair and was the most challenging of almost all of my designs. The tenon jig was a star player in the success of that chair.



    part one

    part two


    Michael


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