Threading wood
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Threading wood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default Threading wood

    Since some of us were talking about grinding and this is a woodworking forum, here's some of each.

    I mess around building cue sticks sometimes.
    Some internal parts are threaded together on modern cues, but since i only make traditional full splices, have not needed to do much wood threading that cannot be accomplished with a regular lathe stick bit. However, some materials are better threaded, because they don't bond all that well with glue. Delrin is a common material for butt caps, and should be threaded as well as glued.

    Recently i made a cue that required threading bloodwood for a Delrin cap. Not only was it difficult to accomplish but it was also quite a mess. Needing to do a similar task on an ebony cue with a walnut dowel extension, i decided to make a threading tool that could come straight in from the side for working close to the TS center.

    dsc_0009.jpg

    dsc_0013.jpg

    dsc_0014.jpg

    dsc_0017.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default

    Cutter was made last night, had to try it out today.

    First need was a mount for the Dremel to toolpost.
    Dremel has a weird .748 - 13 thread (not metric, either)

    dsc_0030.jpg

    dsc_0031.jpg

    thread was cut about 50% depth, then saturated with thin superglue to consolidate the wood.

    dsc_0033.jpg

    After the glue set, i packed the threads with Trewax to prevent the cyanoacrylic from possibly melting and sticking to the bit. This might not have been necessary.

    dsc_0034.jpg

    After threading to depth, the wax was cleaned up with naptha & acetone.

    dsc_0040.jpg.

    smt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    628
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    961
    Likes (Received)
    362

    Default

    Awesome Dremel mount! I have a new neighbor that has a pool table. What is the going rate for a SMT reject pool cue? Finally finished my long planned work bench but can’t afford a Loopy. However I might be able to own a sweet pool cue!
    Joe

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,234
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    517
    Likes (Received)
    681

    Default

    Great work Stephen!

    I've been using a little pencil die grinder as an alternative to the dremel. I got fed up with it's plastic construction and flexing. The die grinder is all metal, has better concentricity, goes WAY faster, and is easy fixture, has a 5/8" body. And the cheap ones (HF) seem just fine.

  5. Likes michiganbuck liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    6,626
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5726
    Likes (Received)
    6157

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Great work Stephen!

    I've been using a little pencil die grinder as an alternative to the dremel. I got fed up with it's plastic construction and flexing. The die grinder is all metal, has better concentricity, goes WAY faster, and is easy fixture, has a 5/8" body. And the cheap ones (HF) seem just fine.
    I wondered about that too. Most Dremels (and clones) seem to have a lot of flex that can cause chatter when in a router base or tool post mount. I have one of the slim high-speed air die grinders but I'm thinking of buying one of the Proxxon tools that has a 20mm metal nose.

    https://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-38481.../dp/B001FWXEO6

    Anybody used one of the Proxxon tools in such a mount and can offer an opinion on how rigid they are vs a Dremel?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Redwood City, CA USA
    Posts
    5,198
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    221
    Likes (Received)
    1063

    Default

    I did similar once upon a time by mounting a plunge router vertically on the carriage of my dad's 9" South Bend. I used a 60° V router bit from Sears, back when Sears actually sold stuff like that. It worked great. The screws were made of maple and were about 1-1/2" - 4tpi.

  8. Likes michiganbuck liked this post
  9. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,522
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5222
    Likes (Received)
    2064

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Anybody used one of the Proxxon tools in such a mount and can offer an opinion on how rigid they are vs a Dremel?
    I have not used a Proxxon, but I have used a Foredom shaft-driven handpiece, and a Foredom handpiece is incomparably stiffer than a Dremel. I've done (very) light milling of steel with a Foredom mounted over my Hardinge DSM-59.

  10. Likes cyanidekid liked this post
  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    1,843
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    171

    Default

    Come on guys. I was going to write you can't polish a turd but SMT as usual seems to have accomplished that with the Dremel.

    But this is the real deal 45,000 rpm all metal with cast iron mount one sweet tool.

    Super 30

    Andy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_5688.jpg  

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    1,843
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    171

    Default

    Stephen

    What glue do you use for Delrin?

    Great work as always

    Andy

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default

    Andy -

    Love those all metal cast case grinders!

    To other advisors - I actually have an air die grinder & considered it. It even already has a lathe mount because among other apps, I use it to sharpen the end of the rotary broach punches i make from time to time. For this app, the Dremel was a better choice for several reasons including where it fit in the tight corner of my poor little SB 10K. It is plenty rigid for threads up to 6 or 5 pitch, which is the limit of the cutter's overall diameter.

    Delrin/acetal was popularized for butt caps about the time custom cue making took off during the 60's. As Andy alludes, there are no common glues that adhere it. Hence the threads. If the threads are then notched internally, it won't be easy to unwind it after the glue sets. Epoxy is what i use. With threads, other stick-um products are viable. The nice thing about threads is that the other components can be clocked if necessary to a pattern, and then the cap screwed on as the clamp.

    As it turns out (no pun intended) the black rod of acetal i thought was in supplies, had been used up to make sleeves and collets. So the internally threaded cap in the photo above is actually linen phenolic tube, which glues well with epoxy or super glue.

    smt

  14. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default

    dsc_0052.jpg

    dsc_0060.jpg

  15. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,234
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    517
    Likes (Received)
    681

    Default

    Stephen, that seems like a dangerous place to keep your cues. Some cold desperate nite they might wind up in the stove...

  16. Likes Scottl, stephen thomas liked this post
  17. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default



    sounds like stories from my parents during depression.
    "and then they had to burn your uncle Bill's piano one piece at a time to stay warm and that's why he always played in honky tonks and road houses after he got back from the war"
    smt

  18. Likes Joe Rogers liked this post
  19. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,676
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    434
    Likes (Received)
    356

    Default

    Thanks for showing us this really nice work.

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,932
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    1151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    dsc_0052.jpg

    dsc_0060.jpg
    Are you any good at the game? Or do you just like looking at the sticks?

    In the days before the Dremel the operator used a thread forming tool and moved it by hand on a lathe tool rest. I witnessed a demonstration of that manual method.

  21. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default

    Are you any good at the game? Or do you just like looking at the sticks?
    ?"do you walk to work or carry your lunch?"

    They're not mutually exclusive. Can you clarify your question?
    Also real name so i can check your Fargorate.

    I witnessed a demonstration of that manual method.
    Do you do woodworking yourself, or just watch it?
    I have a box of chasers and have used them for fun, but the ones on hand are too fine for these threads and don't work well in stringy wood like the walnut dowel in the ebony handle. Most guys making cues today use wing cutters in a mini-router, and come in axially rather than radially. This is possible when the cue fits through the headstock, or runs in a steady.

    smt
    Last edited by stephen thomas; 05-03-2020 at 02:43 PM.

  22. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,234
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    517
    Likes (Received)
    681

    Default

    Yeah, I wondered about using a wing cutter, or even better a saw blade reground to 60 degree angle. Might be a reasonable investment if one were doing a bunch of threading. Not much cutting going on at the very tip of that router cutter...

  23. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,932
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    1151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    Do you do woodworking yourself, or just watch it?
    I do woodworking, and then like to watch the results.
    I already posted pictures of a kitchen I built from scratch, a dining room table, storage cabinet, hand cut dovetail joints (part of a bedroom set with about 200 dovetail joints in all).
    If you can find em in this forum mess then have fun.

    Made some tools too, here is a scraping plane for a dining room table.

    plane1.jpg

    A mortising machine.

    tool4.jpg

    Enjoy your pool cues, they like nice.
    Last edited by rons; 05-04-2020 at 03:48 PM.

  24. Likes rustytool liked this post
  25. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    1,978
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1420
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    beautiful work, thanks for sharing.

    seems like a micro angle grinder is a good option. can use a circumferential cutter, it's compact enough to mount on just about any lathe, reasonably priced versions are available, and enough power for finer wood threads

  26. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4171
    Likes (Received)
    3973

    Default

    Cyanide-

    Thanks! Per your post & Richard's, maybe something like a 60deg dovetail cutter, on a diagonal, would do the trick. I might try that, though it could require the more rigid motor options that have been mentioned.

    RonS - nice work. I can't tell if the plane is all plates, or part plates and part casting - as from a donor plane?
    Per cue sports: You started the woofing - so talk about your game?

    Are you any good at the game? Or do you just like looking at the sticks?
    During the late 70's and early 80's i played a lot of barbox pool. Also made tooling, metal and wood parts, and some machinery like mortise machines & shaper sliding cope tables for other shops including a guy who built pool tables on the side. At that time, with the break in 8 ball/barbox, i was about even odds to run out. Occasionally even a 2 or rarely 3 pack. Solo 9 ball game was not nearly as strong but i made money in cheap ring games. Then got into aviation, met my life partner, had a kid, moved, and didn't play for some 25 years. In the early 20-teens with eye troubles and nothing else to do for a while, i picked up pool again to torture myself. It's not like riding a bicycle. You remember what you could do, and fail miserably. Part of my problem is also that due to the retina and cataract surgeries and scar tissue, i've finally come to realize that i don't exactly see the ball quite where it is. Like trying to grab a fish in water.

    If i play a lot, which is seldom possible, the mind compensates. But at my age, it also goes away quickly without constant practice. So no, I'm not very good. Still have fun with the group i shoot with. Great guys including a couple Fargorate low 600's. People like that keep you humble with how good you are not. Getting back in, sticks had suddenly become expensive. I'm a cheapskate. So got scrap wood out of the loft and built a couple for myself. Then kept on doing it, though sporadically. Mostly ideas to try out. Sometimes people like them and i've sold a few. Not into highly decorated sticks, but have ideas about how one should feel. Like many people who make them, I sort of feel that a BBC 360 style could be an interesting challenge.

    Mostly i like machining and gluing up blanks. Sort of the instant gratification level.

    dsc_0008.jpg

    dsc_0022.jpg

    dsc_0024.jpg

    In the last photo, it's probably obvious - table legs on the right, cue blanks on the left.

    dsc_0040.jpg

    smt


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •