What are your favorite "go-to" planes
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    1,838
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    367
    Likes (Received)
    509

    Default What are your favorite "go-to" planes

    Starting a new thread for this after the comments on the Industrial Design Art thread

    The planes I use most often are all Stanleys - old 3, 4, & 5 bench planes, and 65 and 60-1/2 low angle block planes. A long time ago I put in a lot of effort on the 3, 4, & 5 - I re-machined the frogs and their seats to fit perfectly, surface ground the soles and sides flat and perpendicular (for shooting). Trued the edge of the cap irons for perfect fit to the blades. I use older Stanley irons, Hock, a laminated Japanese, and a laminated M-42 I made. They all seem to work fine. The block planes were hand scraped or lapped flat.

    I've had these planes for 40-50 yrs, if I were starting now I'd probably go for Bedrocks or maybe Lie-Nielsen if I had excess $$. I also have Stanley 6,7 & 8, but don't use them anywhere near as much these days. And I have my dad's old #1, which was the plane I grew up using. Don't ever use that, too valuable now.

  2. Likes lucky7 liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    the Netherlands
    Posts
    205
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    13

    Default

    I have a couple older stanley nos 3 and 4, well used and properly tuned. A no. 4 remains the most used together with a smaller stanley block plane. Bought a new stanley no.6 a few years back. The sole looked like it had been finished by a dull beaver and the edge curled over, even when properly ground. After lapping and with an aftermarket blade it worked fine. I avoid stanley since this one.
    I also have a few old dutch/german style wooden planes. If properly adjusted thes work fine and since they weigh considerably less than a steel equivalent they are easier whenworking with them for a longer period.
    Veritas(lee valley tools) of canada makes really nice planes but expensive. I just got a spokeshave I ordered and it works beautifully out of the box. Kunz of Germany introduced their plus range a while back. Also well made and properly finished.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    130
    Likes (Received)
    1162

    Default

    An older Stanley #5 is my go-to. It's narrow enough to be easy to push, and long enough to give decent flatness. I also use a low angle block plane, a Record, I think. Though I own a number of shorter and wider planes, I don't find them useful for much of anything. I will use a bigger and longer plane for larger boards because the added mass smooths things out a lot. I also have installed Hock blades in the ones I use the most. Bedrocks are nice, but I don't own any. Oh, and those ubiquitous little green 2" long things are sometimes useful.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    834
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    322
    Likes (Received)
    291

    Default

    Any plane made by these guys :-)


    https://youtu.be/Sn8KJlPX674


    Lucky7

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    158
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    I were starting now I'd probably go for Bedrocks or maybe Lie-Nielsen if I had excess $$. I also have Stanley 6,7 & 8, but don't use them anywhere near as much these days. And I have my dad's old #1, which was the plane I grew up using. Don't ever use that, too valuable now.
    I would agree with your sentiments. I find that, in my area of the nation, the bedrocks go for similar amounts of money as a Lie-Nielsen. I find the Lie-Nielsen to be very good quality. Of course, you can spend as much as you want to on planes...there are a lot of top notch planemakers out there. But I find that L-N is a good compromise that gives a lot of value. I, too, reach for the good ole standard Stanley/Bailey 3, 5 and 8 bench planes using the Moxon rule of three. I think I have a #4 that I keep set up for figured woods in place of the 3 but I can't remember.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,531
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    312
    Likes (Received)
    247

    Default

    I'll go with three favorites:
    Most used and oldest is a Stanley 60 1/2 low angle block plane - its small and light and a good fit in my hand. Probably had it about 35-40 years. Second favorite is a Veritas Scrub Plane. Amazing how fast it will rough level a board and its fun to use until I get tired! Last is a Lie Nielsen 140 Skew block plane with a fence in bronze. Not used a lot but sometimes nothing else will do. Not the most hand friendly for me as its kind of heavy and slick.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Interior British Columbia
    Posts
    2,162
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    224
    Likes (Received)
    651

    Default

    I started out interested more in metalwork, came to woodwork of almost any form, more by accident than design.

    I retired out of the Military, and moved back to the family home, a farm here in the interior of BC, and am now the fourth generation here since great Grandfather bought the place.

    Such were times, nothing much ever really got thrown away, so many of my Grandfather's old tools, were still floating around, including a couple planes, one a wood bodied smoother with a pretty good split in it, and a couple Stanley units of somewhat ill repute, if you go by the looks.
    There were also a couple hand crank drills, a box of auger bits and a brace, a saw vise, and a couple sketchy looking hand saws, among the rubble and assorted other rusty items, not all of which I have come to recognize the use of.
    But it did start me down the path to enjoying actually being able to do some work around here, without being blessed by high pitched noises, or the need to do everything within reach of electrical power.

    Some few years back, I was blessed by the gift of a plethora of Veritas planes, bench and specialty, which had been gathered together by their former owner, I suspect, mostly because he was fairly enamored of them being both 'nice things', as well as their being Canadian made. In any case, I seem to have skipped rather a huge step in my process here, as I am rather well equipped, if under-skilled in their use.

    Cancer being the sonofabitch that it is, he never really got the chance to use them, if that was indeed his plan.

    In any case, I was blessed with a large storage tote of Veritas planes ranging from a Number 5 on down, as well as several other implements of wood destruction, almost entirely a Veritas wood shop worth. I really need to build an appropriate cabinet for them, if only because the deserve better than to be tucked away out of sight in their boxes. I think it fair that I should include a space for his picture in the case, too. I owe him a lot for his gift.

    So far, my go-to plane for use has been the Skew Block Plane. It has been of great utility to me in the jobs I have needed it for, mostly trim carpentry and the like around the house.

    Since I already have a bunch, I have since added a Veritas scrub plane, and recently ordered a Apron Plane and a pocket plane from Lee valley.

    While looking about at the various offerings, I concluded that the Lie Nelson Block plane just did not appeal to my eye, and having a Stanly Low angle Block plane already, I was looking for something that would look good sitting on a shelf, as much as a using tool, which is what drew me to the design and looks of the polished up Veritas NX-60, sadly unavailable.

    So, that's my add to this, from a fella that is thoroughly under-qualified to hold much more of an opinion beyond that the tools are nice, attractive, and feel good in hand.

    Thanks Robert!

    Cheers
    Trev

  9. Likes lucky7 liked this post
  10. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    126
    Likes (Received)
    145

    Default

    Oh! This an easy one for me:

    Stanley Junior Jack (5 1/4)

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    126
    Likes (Received)
    145

    Default

    Just noticed the post said: planes (plural)

    So I must add the Lie-Nielsen Miter Plane

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,415
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    108
    Likes (Received)
    800

    Default

    Jet Blue Mint Class. Hell yeah and not going to crumple myself in steerage any more.
    Or is this the wrong plane?

  13. Likes fusker liked this post
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    126
    Likes (Received)
    145

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy887 View Post
    Jet Blue Mint Class. Hell yeah and not going to crumple myself in steerage any more.
    Or is this the wrong plane?
    Jet Blue out of Long Beach for sure!

  15. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,714
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    44
    Likes (Received)
    174

    Default

    #62 Lie-Neilsen Low angle jack, just so nice to use.
    Also an old, very short, infill plane that I restored and made a new handle, works well, tap, tap, tap.

  16. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    2,992
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1758
    Likes (Received)
    1989

    Default

    Just about the only hand plane I ever use.
    My trusty Stanley 102

    9f166b81-e503-47ed-83f5-320183425c31.jpg

    These days I break a edge or scrub down a high spot with this little guy- more than that and the work goes to a joiner/planer.

  17. Likes fusker liked this post
  18. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    1,191
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    263
    Likes (Received)
    614

    Default

    I am not a woodworker, but like to work in wood. Most of the time I use the Stanley bailey No 3 corrugated, the Millers Falls No 85 and the small E.C.E block plane.
    planes.jpg

  19. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    A Stanley #3 has been my workhorse for a couple years. Flatten, joint, shoot ends... it does it all.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •