Why are wood cnc machines so cheesy? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 26 of 26
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    5,109
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    827

    Default

    At one time or another the big guys in the stringed musical instrument business on the west coast were customers (Warmoth, Taylor, Tacoma, Dusty Strings, etc)


    With one exception they all use machine tools rather than wood routers. Since they don't use sheet goods the travels of a 40-20 mill are more than adequate. Fadals are popular. You can buy one used for a reasonable price, have the Fadal guy from Idaho come over and do what repairs may be needed, and upgrade the spindle to 10K RPM. Not that Fadals are the ultimate, more that one of them went that way and others followed.

    Some of the reasons for machine tools are reliability, accuracy and readily available service. And the price is right.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    392
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    80
    Likes (Received)
    96

    Default

    If this video doesn't get someone excited about manufacturing... Guitar String on YouTube

    About 2:10 shows a pretty cool machine


    Quote Originally Posted by kenton View Post
    Haas gantry mills ..... operators said they held .010" corner to corner but I wouldn't swear it.
    Right, and hence there are bountiful options at 1/3 the price that can hold that if you can tolerate a PC control, etc. OP wants .005 across a sheet which will be hard to do.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    West Virginia
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    31

    Default

    Wood isn’t going to let you have .005”. Solid wood will move more than that from thermal expansion across the machine. Machines that exceed the mechanical limitations of its intended material by several orders of magnitude are going to be hard to find since there’s a market of approximately one person.

    Regarding the quality and pricing in your question, woodworking equipment caters to three primary markets, contractors/carpenters, industrial manufacturers and everybody else. The first two markets have their own needs which don’t include affordable CNC. The everybody else group is notorious for using their tools twice then going off to buy fly fishing gear or whatever else catches their eye; it’s big business. It’s also packed with garbage because most people will never know. A lot of companies specialize in delivering that garbage, so when you go shopping it’s the majority of what you see.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    You can certainly get better than .005" in wood. Unless the environment has hourly humidity swings then you won't see any kind of expansion on a daily basis, wood expands with change in Relative humidity which is typically progressive.

    Yes, the wood won't be the same size when you come back to it three months later, but that is not what you need with a machine. You need repeatable tolerance and accurate sizing to make parts fit, let those parts move together as an assembly later on.

    Accurate mortise and tenon work is better than .005" typically.

    I check my machinery with inspection tools and check my squareness tolerances with the same tools because I often mill up wood then use a Bridgeport mill to pocket out mortises in the center of wide panels. If they're through mortises the board must be very accurate in squareness and parallelism for me to pocket out from both sides in toward center and have them match.

    When I mortise on a mill, I'm within .001" between mortise and tenon, cut, checked and verified. When I use woodworking machinery of high quality I'm typically .001"-.003" depending on the machine.

  5. Likes Comatose liked this post
  6. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    barcelona, spain
    Posts
    2,369
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    525
    Likes (Received)
    1422

    Default

    Lots of good posts.
    Afaik the haas gr router series is mostly discontinued.

    Any sw controller or old hw controller is more than good enough.
    The ones who need more, can easily state it and pay accordingly.

    E.
    It is trivial to make any commercial router more stiff via added material.
    Fast, less than one week, cheap.
    E.
    Faster toolchangers via servos, etc.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    West Virginia
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    31

    Default

    I highly recommend this volume as required reading for anyone working with natural (non-engineered) wood at .01” or finer. Although some of it is dense reading the limitations imposed by the mechanical properties of the materials should be understood by anyone wanting to work at the jagged, splintery edge of wood.
    https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/f...fpl_gtr190.pdf


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •