Wood work using a metal cutting machine? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,159
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    480
    Likes (Received)
    662

    Default

    There are no hard and fast rules (commandments on a stone table), you cuts what you wants on your own machines. But the dust is real, as are the nasty metal chips from cutting aluminum on woodworking machines.

    I wouldn't cut wood on that Makino or a prisine 10ee if I owned one. But an old Bridgeport, Southbend, whatever... for sure!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,557
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    319
    Likes (Received)
    2069

    Default

    Last week I was turning lignum vitae on my Clausing 10”, what a dream, great finish,etc.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    236
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    50

    Default

    Well, rivett608, I thought you were stealing my thunder for a second!...

    Here is the latest video from Lignum, one of my favorite YouTube channels:



    He uses robots in most of his videos for building structural wood elements, furniture, art pieces, and even music instruments. Fun to watch and somewhat related to the subject at hand.

    Jacques

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    North East
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Toot Uncommon;3573513[...
    used mill and lathe [...]cutting wood using a metal cutting cnc like a Haas or Makino. I find hardly an info on it. There must be a reason, no?
    I use my vertical knee mill for woodwork. I have to be careful of the silica rich dust. It's like any other abrasive.
    I intend to make get an arbor for wood shaper cutters and , mount a large wood torsion box on the table to use the thing as a shaper to make doors and windows and chairs.

    You can also use a metal lathe as a profiling moulder.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    975
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    161
    Likes (Received)
    147

    Default

    One consideration when machining wood on a metal cutting machine is that the wood chips absorbs the way oil and can cause the slides to run dry over the ways. NSK used wood chips to test their self lubing linear rail system for this reason, as it was the worst material to have on the rails. Have a brush to sweep the chips off and an oil can to squirt extra way oil keeps a lathe bed and carriage happy when cutting wood.

    John

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    5,180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    897

    Default

    In my shop we made metal parts for most of the big guys in the stringed musical instrument business on the west coast.

    The reason you see so many Fadal's in the shops was explained to me. The machines are readily available used in the under $10K range. Another $10K or so to upgrade to a high speed spindle, etc. Taylor started using Fadal's, so other makers not being intimately familiar with CNC followed.

    AFAIK, new machine builders, Haas and others, have no problem warranting their machines for woodworking.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    589
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    166
    Likes (Received)
    187

    Default

    CNC routers use linear bearings just like metal working machines. Most of them don't have way covers.

    I ran a few black walnut parts on my VMC recently. I postulated that I could run it in flood coolant, and the coolant wouldn't discolor the wood much and you wouldn't notice the different in the finished part. I was really excited, thought it was going to be a whole new thing: no. Terrible idea. Turned my coolant brown within a few minutes. Then the pump started having difficulty, and that was the end of that experiment. I think it could work well with a good dust collection setup.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sacramento County, California
    Posts
    4,178
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2651
    Likes (Received)
    1557

    Default

    On occasion I've used my milling machine for wood-working projects. Once my son needed to bed an air rifle barrel into a new laminated sporter stock. The barrel was exactly 1" in diameter all along its length. We made a fixture to hold the barrel in position and I used a 1" ball mill to travel the length of the barrel to bed the air rifle barrel. It worked nicely.

    Other times, I've use a 14" end mill to travel the length of a new guitar neck to seat an adjustable truss rod.

    There was no harm to the mill at all, Just a bit of vacuuming during and after the jobs were finished.

    I think it's perfectly appropriate to use a mill in this way. It worked for me.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •