Induma vertical mill
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  1. #1
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    Default Induma vertical mill

    I looked at this mill several months ago, and had read everything I could find on Induma before going to se it. So, based on the non existent parts support, and relative scarcity I offered about scrap value and was turned away. Got a phone call yesterday and it was mine, delivered, for $300.
    It runs, and the table moves very nicely with no backlash on the handles. I am completely unfamiliar with the various levers on the head, as my south bend mill is completely different. I am hoping to find a copy of the manual without spending $20 for a pdf, in the meantime if anyone cares to point out any details it would be a huge help. I do have a few odd R8 collets and a spare VFD to get it under power in a few days..
    Really, I don't need a second mill, but for the price I couldn't go wrong. I figure I'll keep whichever suits my needs best and sell the other. I do like the 30 taper and rigidity of the round ram south bend mill, but the overall tightness of this Induma, and the head nod feature make me wonder if it is more capable.
    My business is welding/ custom fabrication/ repair, and machine shop tools are a relatively recent addition to my stable. I'm pretty much self taught, reading, watching and asking before I jump into anything. Any advice or thoughts appreciated.
    SD
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0217.jpg   img_0218.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by badwithusernames View Post
    I looked at this mill several months ago, and had read everything I could find on Induma before going to se it. So, based on the non existent parts support, and relative scarcity I offered about scrap value and was turned away. Got a phone call yesterday and it was mine, delivered, for $300.
    It runs, and the table moves very nicely with no backlash on the handles. I am completely unfamiliar with the various levers on the head, as my south bend mill is completely different. I am hoping to find a copy of the manual without spending $20 for a pdf, in the meantime if anyone cares to point out any details it would be a huge help. I do have a few odd R8 collets and a spare VFD to get it under power in a few days..
    Really, I don't need a second mill, but for the price I couldn't go wrong. I figure I'll keep whichever suits my needs best and sell the other. I do like the 30 taper and rigidity of the round ram south bend mill, but the overall tightness of this Induma, and the head nod feature make me wonder if it is more capable.
    My business is welding/ custom fabrication/ repair, and machine shop tools are a relatively recent addition to my stable. I'm pretty much self taught, reading, watching and asking before I jump into anything. Any advice or thoughts appreciated.
    SD
    And it is the rare wall mounted version!

  3. #3
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    Didn't you read his post moonlight? He already has a vertical.

  4. #4
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    I bought an Induma about 15 years ago for a song. A friend talked me out of it before I even got to use it. It was a great machine. About the same footprint as a Bridgeport, but heavier and more rigid in the knee.

  5. #5
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    You got a great deal, I'd say. I don't know the Idumas first hand, but it looks like one of a million BP clones, so you should get some good information on the controls from a BP manual. Lots of copies on the internet; here is the first that popped up on Google: http://www.truetex.com/bridgeport-manual.pdf

  6. #6
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    The gentleman I worked for bought one new in the late 60's. It was a great machine. There should be very few parts necessary since it is a step pulley machine. Wonderful deal, I'll give you your money back plus some.

  7. #7
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    induma was italian . this page could probably be translated :

    Bloc-notes - 19 janvier 29

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnmgcarbide View Post
    induma was italian . this page could probably be translated :

    Bloc-notes - 19 janvier 29
    FYI: those pages are in French.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    FYI: those pages are in French.
    Bill D
    i don't speak french either....might just as well be sanskrit or tamil.

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    Default

    e74ced58-1105-4360-a27f-bfa3136d28e2.jpg

    Corrected with an iphone
    879707be-0891-46d8-8d15-fe90611bf932.jpg

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the links and humor.. I swear the pics are oriented correctly when I open them on my laptop, not sure how they were rotated when uploaded. I've spent some time with it today. Discovered a few things and of course a few more questions..
    It is VERY tight in all operation, the table travel in all axis has the least wear of anything I've ever measured or used, and that makes me happy. There is a coolant pump and tank mounted in the base of the machine, and it shows signs of wanting to work. Everything else seems to work, except the "reverse knob" that is in the center of the fine quill feed wheel. It's maybe stuck, but more likely that I'm an idiot and was doing something wrong.. I'll brush up on my French and look at that manual. There is also what appears to be a pump for way oil mounted inside the left end of the table. See the sight glass to show oil level? The silver lever to the left of it might operate a pump, as there is a small (4mm) hard line running from it up under the table. However it works I haven't figured yet, but will. Head nod and rotate work well, and the arm (for lack of proper term, round ram on my South Bend) swings side to side, and slides in and out. If it had a 30 taper spindle, I would definitely keep it. Might anyway..

  12. #12
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    Hi there, I have an Induma with the optional 30 Int taper, which I ''went right through (mainly cleaning and new bearings) about 9 years back'', ....IMHO a good machine of it's type - heavier and a in some ways better than the Bridgeport (but not a lot in it) with the added advantage of not attracting BP prices.

    Mine had a hard life before it came my way, but after some minor TLC still does a fair job.


    The quill power feed centre reversing buttons do stick, seems to be a trait, perseverance and maybe a clean out.

    That is the oil pump. pull handle tight out and hold until it's full of oil, and leave to oil under spring pressure , .the oil lines can DO? get blocked - removal of the table is needed to get to the manifold and metering units.

    Watch the Y axis lock, it's not easy to use and isn't that good at it's job.

    FWIW on my machine (I can't vouch for others) the Bridgeport toothed belt fits the low speed back gear drive - it's a tad narrower but don't worry. ...........Oh and the back gear drum cam on top of the spindle will stick if dust builds up.

    P.S. Yours has the table power feed - you jammy bugger

  13. #13
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    Manuals are available on ebay for some models: induma mill manual | eBay

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    Google translate seems to work pretty good for this. but you have to cut and paste just the words.
    Bill

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    hjer eis what google trnaslate has to say
    The Induma 1-S (American market) or "Testa Veloce" (Italian market) is an Italian version of the famous American Bridgeport Series I. But compared to the latter, the construction has been simplified and weighed down. It has the reputation of being more robust and rigid than the original, including from Americans; it's saying everything.

    The Bridgeport Series I is the milling machine that can be seen in all Discovery Channel TV shows dedicated to mechanics: Bikers Duels, American Chopper, American Hot Rod, etc.

    The Induma table is exactly the same size (9 "x 42", ie 230 mm x 1070 mm), and can be used to install a cylinder head. However, the X run is quite low: 480 mm; this is due to a wider cross slide, offering better guidance and greater rigidity. It is possible to easily extend this race to reach the displacement offered by the Bridgeport (about 750 mm): it is enough to make spacers and extensions of the worm.

    The head looks identical, at least in its controls and positions.

    A Bridgeport Series I weighs a ton:

    head: 90 kg
    pivot: 40 kg
    ram: 99 kg
    turret: 97 kg
    base: 324 kg
    console: 117 kg
    transversal: 64 kg
    table (long version: 48 "): 166 kg
    Total: 997 kg

    It is equipped with a standard electrical cabinet. Unfortunately everything is in 24 V AC. It may be redone for various reasons 24 V continuous. The spindle motor will be powered by the centralized installation based on a frequency converter.

    The console offers a slider longer than a standard 1-S: 360 mm Y travel, or a little more if a slight overhang is tolerated. A Bridgeport allows a displacement of only 250 mm.

    No play, no noticeable wear of the slides (the bacon - conical - do not go anywhere).

    The worms have a 0.2 mm clearance over their entire length, which seems to be the original value from a discussion with the owner of a machine of the same model.

    The controls are soft, very pleasant on all axes. The vertical displacement is only 1.25 mm per revolution of the crank: a fast approach motor will undoubtedly be considered!

    Such a machine makes it possible to machine heavy parts. A Bridgeport Series I can support 325 kg on the table. This Induma certainly allows more. A cast iron engine block can be installed.

    Opening of the advance box. Nothing complicated. A sliding pinion recovers the movement on one of the 6 top gears. The bottom ones are used to select between normal advance and fast forward. The gables are in excellent condition.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Google translate seems to work pretty good for this. but you have to cut and paste just the words.
    Bill
    Use Chrome for this. It can handle whole web pages, so no cut and paste needed.

  17. #17
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    not sure what the translated "Console" means. I would think control panel or table? Why would you want to switch from ac control voltages to DC?
    I have no idea what the "bacon" is referring to
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    not sure what the translated "Console" means. I would think control panel or table? Why would you want to switch from ac control voltages to DC?

    Bill D
    Console would more than likely be control panel or electrical enclosure, .......as for DC I THINK ???? the factory table feed motors were variable speed DC.

  19. #19
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    We have a Induma "Supermill" Horizontal mill (dunno the specific model as the tag is missing). Well built but has some critical damages that have me on the fence of saving or selling/scraping it. It also has the overarm stabilizer and a complete vertical attachment. Parts don't seem to be available on this continent however and I have a feeling that I'll be getting into custom gear making if I try to save it...

  20. #20
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    I have had an Induma for almost 50 years now. I picked up three of them and had no intention of keeping them. I sold one straight away but kept two for a while. I found they had a little more capacity than my B-ports. I traded one for a K&T 205 a few years back. I still have one, I have a 4 axis Newall DRO on that one. The only complaint is the Z axis only moves half as much on a turn as a B-port. Martin


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