Daewoo A20 20x60 Lathe Repair or Scrap
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    Default Daewoo A20 20x60 Lathe Repair or Scrap

    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    For better for for worse, it's in my driveway... Tomorrow is washing and unloading day.



    Continued from this thread here: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...on-tips-388604

    I'm not sure yet whether I'll keep it or scrap it. Seems to have a lot of problems in the tailstock, apron, and a few in the feedbox. Gonna need new belts, etc. It all depends on how good the ballscrew and ways are. If those are good. I'll fix the rest. Compound definitely has issues. I'll make my money back on the accessories if I scrap it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    Continued from this thread here: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...on-tips-388604

    I'm not sure yet whether I'll keep it or scrap it. Seems to have a lot of problems in the tailstock, apron, and a few in the feedbox. Gonna need new belts, etc. It all depends on how good the ballscrew and ways are. If those are good. I'll fix the rest. Compound definitely has issues. I'll make my money back on the accessories if I scrap it.
    I don't understand the issue with the belts? My old employer used to order 6" wide poly-vee belts from Gates rubber for a 40-hp impact mill.
    Is that the kind of belt you mean? I'm sure Gates has a suitable replacement.

    I'll bet problems in the apron and feed box are due to untrained gorillas trying to shift while still running... I've seem ppl do that. Had one guy that engaged the spindle with the key still in the chuck, *bang!* new chuck time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    I don't understand the issue with the belts? My old employer used to order 6" wide poly-vee belts from Gates rubber for a 40-hp impact mill.
    Is that the kind of belt you mean? I'm sure Gates has a suitable replacement.

    I'll bet problems in the apron and feed box are due to untrained gorillas trying to shift while still running... I've seem ppl do that. Had one guy that engaged the spindle with the key still in the chuck, *bang!* new chuck time.
    The B belts from the sub gearbox to the headstock are probably ok. One needs to be tossed, the others can most likely stay. The A belts from the motor to the subgearbox are chooched. Very loose.

    There is a third flatbelt that may be hard to get, but may be ok. But in general I'm trying not to dump too much money into a potential pig in a poke, which was what I was getting at.

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    I am regularly astonished at the revenue I generate using machines that were discarded as scrap by previous owners.

    Does the lathe work? Are the spindle bearings, headstock and feed gears OK?

    One of my big lathes has a fucked tailstock. It ain't such a bad deal when I'm using it to straighten out a 5" 1810 dumptruck driveline with a rosebud and 50 ton enerpac. I have turned a 5MT dead center into a pretzel. You would cringe, but I made $1200 in a few hours.

    I have hit and held size in a 2.5"ish bore to a tenth over 10" with the same lathe. It was a bitch, but it did it.

    That lathe cost me $3500 and it makes about $10k cash annually. If I had got it for only a few hundred bucks I'd be ever more happy with it. And if that sounds like a lot more than scrap price it is. The lathe was free. The $3500 paid for the brand new Newall DRO with a 120" scale and a truckload of tooling.

    If you don't have time to fix it's problems now patch it up good enough and fix the shit that's busted as you need to use it.

    Most of my machines were that way. I bought them busted up for cheap and fixed them as I needed them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I am regularly astonished at the revenue I generate using machines that were discarded as scrap by previous owners.

    Does the lathe work? Are the spindle bearings, headstock and feed gears OK?

    One of my big lathes has a fucked tailstock. It ain't such a bad deal when I'm using it to straighten out a 5" 1810 dumptruck driveline with a rosebud and 50 ton enerpac. I have turned a 5MT dead center into a pretzel. You would cringe, but I made $1200 in a few hours.

    I have hit and held size in a 2.5"ish bore to a tenth over 10" with the same lathe. It was a bitch, but it did it.

    That lathe cost me $3500 and it makes about $10k cash annually. If I had got it for only a few hundred bucks I'd be ever more happy with it. And if that sounds like a lot more than scrap price it is. The lathe was free. The $3500 paid for the brand new Newall DRO with a 120" scale and a truckload of tooling.

    If you don't have time to fix it's problems now patch it up good enough and fix the shit that's busted as you need to use it.

    Most of my machines were that way. I bought them busted up for cheap and fixed them as I needed them.

    No, Yes (I think), maybe, and maybe. It does not feed atm.

    The tailstock is tight in the bore, but the shifter and retracter mechanism is stiff. They also broke the gated shifter. Nothing I can't fix. It spins fine though.

    I've done some decent work on my very worn Sidney, but taking a cut is like rolling a die as to how much it takes. Cuts pretty straight once you get it to the number you want.

    I actually agree with my employer on this one. It's basically useless to my workplace.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    There is a third flatbelt that may be hard to get, but may be ok. But in general I'm trying not to dump too much money into a potential pig in a poke, which was what I was getting at.
    Right, clean it up a bit first and see what ya got. I know you're capable to fix the gear and feed issues. And all the mechanicla issues. Will be happy to bet you can find the belts at a farm supply for less than $300. And have one hell of of lathe for the next 30 years. Making $$$ off it like Garwood says.

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    Well, she's put down in my garage. Not quite on the ground, but as close to it as it well ever be in my possession.

    I started by washing it. I think I did 3.5 cycles of purple power and pressure wash, basically until I stopped seeing any progress. It is by no means clean, but it's a start. Ironically, the dirtiest part, the chippan, is almost clean enough to paint as is, if I wanted to. It has some old, dried up cutting oil that was reactivated by the water, so I'll have to deal with that. The purple power I used was essential. No carbon came off without it basically. With it, some things cleaned up in one pass. I forgot to grab Dad's venturi sprayer, so I borrowed my roommate's HVLP gun. That of course meant that it was very aerosolized, and my respirators were at dad's, so I wore an old Israeli gas mask lol. Hopefully I don't have mesothelioma now...

    After washing, it was quite clearly green, and the paint is good. I don't like the color, but I won't be repainting it. Other than some areas where the bondo is chipped out and a few normal scratches, it's fine. Very well adhered, I didn't blow any off washing it. So that is a huge time saver.

    Moving it in was actually pretty easy. A big component of that is that @Fjsapper came over and lent me a hand, chain, etc. We popped it up with my floor jack, stuffed a ton of 3/4" Plumbing pipes under it, and cranked it down with a comealong, anchoring to the trailer and some posts in my garage. Went according to plan and there wasn't any iffy moments really. I am very happy with the move overall. A lot of machines get dropped or damaged. The only damage sustained in the entire move is some small sheetmetal bends when it was being dragged by a forklift (before we removed the sheetmetal), and some etched aluminum from the cleaning process. The former I can straighten in five minutes with an adjustable wrench, the latter can be polished right out. The guys at work were really good to work with, they we're careful and respected my knowledge on moving machines, which I much appreciate them for. So that's a big win already.

    So here's some photos. The lighting is poor and it's just cell cam. I'm too tired to take some proper photos today. All in due time.







    So here's what I've learned:


    • The ballscrew doesn't look worn. It definitely does not turn, and isn't supposed to. That's a new one on me.
    • Feeds won't stay engaged. I might be missing a handle on the left side of the apron. The Ikegai maybe slightly different, and I don't have great photos. There is definitely some issues in there. I will have to do a full strip of the apron and saddle anyway to fix the oiling, so eh, nothing unexpected.
    • The one shot oiler even oils the taper attachment. Holy shite. They were serious about wear reduction. 8 wipers on the saddle. 4 on the tailstock. I prefer an oil pump, but oneshots aren't bad if they are pulled frequently. The graphite jams up oil ports so bad that even if they work one day, they might not the next. It's all gonna have to be blasted out.
    • I need 12 new belts.
    • A $140 trailer is a damn good investment.


    Speaking of feeds, look at this impressive arrangement:



    An incredible range of feeds. From 0.0015" to 0.5"!? 0.022 to 0.031 for normal turning operations which is all I ever normally do. And note the interesting method they use to achieve them. The extended feed ranges somehow use the inherent reduction in the spindle to amplify the gear ratios. So the finest feeds use the highest range, and the coarsest feeds use the low range. That's brilliant.

    English threads look fine except for 11.5, 13, and 27. I don't have change gears. Bummer since having a T/A and big bore is well suited for pipe work. I'll find or make the gears I need though if it comes to that. One is a phenolic gear, which I bet quiets the system a lot. It threads English down to an incredibly coarse 9/16th TPI. Metric threads seem to have a good range except 0.8. That's pretty small though. I can't envision cutting an M3 fastener on it. So yeah, feeds are much simpler now than they seemed before.

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    Wow, it cleans up nice! Didn't some other poster say that the ball screw does not turn, but the nut does? I have to confess I like it, I like it a lot. That's an impressive range on the gearbox. I bet you find some "interesting" designs inside that and the apron. Believe it or not, I even like the color because I spent the last couple decades looking at "machine grey". I think the green is easier on the eyes. Hope those belts don't cost too much $$$. But if all the other mechanicals check out or can be fixed, then I think it would be worth it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by clappedoutbport View Post
    well, she's put down in my garage. Not quite on the ground, but as close to it as it well ever be in my possession.

    I started by washing it. I think i did 3.5 cycles of purple power and pressure wash, basically until i stopped seeing any progress. It is by no means clean, but it's a start. Ironically, the dirtiest part, the chippan, is almost clean enough to paint as is, if i wanted to. It has some old, dried up cutting oil that was reactivated by the water, so i'll have to deal with that. The purple power i used was essential. No carbon came off without it basically. With it, some things cleaned up in one pass. I forgot to grab dad's venturi sprayer, so i borrowed my roommate's hvlp gun. That of course meant that it was very aerosolized, and my respirators were at dad's, so i wore an old israeli gas mask lol. Hopefully i don't have mesothelioma now...

    after washing, it was quite clearly green, and the paint is good. I don't like the color, but i won't be repainting it. Other than some areas where the bondo is chipped out and a few normal scratches, it's fine. Very well adhered, i didn't blow any off washing it. So that is a huge time saver.

    Moving it in was actually pretty easy. A big component of that is that @fjsapper came over and lent me a hand, chain, etc. We popped it up with my floor jack, stuffed a ton of 3/4" plumbing pipes under it, and cranked it down with a comealong, anchoring to the trailer and some posts in my garage. Went according to plan and there wasn't any iffy moments really. I am very happy with the move overall. A lot of machines get dropped or damaged. The only damage sustained in the entire move is some small sheetmetal bends when it was being dragged by a forklift (before we removed the sheetmetal), and some etched aluminum from the cleaning process. The former i can straighten in five minutes with an adjustable wrench, the latter can be polished right out. The guys at work were really good to work with, they we're careful and respected my knowledge on moving machines, which i much appreciate them for. So that's a big win already.

    So here's some photos. The lighting is poor and it's just cell cam. I'm too tired to take some proper photos today. All in due time.







    so here's what i've learned:


    • the ballscrew doesn't look worn. It definitely does not turn, and isn't supposed to. That's a new one on me.
    • feeds won't stay engaged. I might be missing a handle on the left side of the apron. The ikegai maybe slightly different, and i don't have great photos. There is definitely some issues in there. I will have to do a full strip of the apron and saddle anyway to fix the oiling, so eh, nothing unexpected.
    • the one shot oiler even oils the taper attachment. Holy shite. They were serious about wear reduction. 8 wipers on the saddle. 4 on the tailstock. I prefer an oil pump, but oneshots aren't bad if they are pulled frequently. The graphite jams up oil ports so bad that even if they work one day, they might not the next. It's all gonna have to be blasted out.
    • i need 12 new belts.
    • a $140 trailer is a damn good investment.


    speaking of feeds, look at this impressive arrangement:



    an incredible range of feeds. From 0.0015" to 0.5"!? 0.022 to 0.031 for normal turning operations which is all i ever normally do. And note the interesting method they use to achieve them. The extended feed ranges somehow use the inherent reduction in the spindle to amplify the gear ratios. So the finest feeds use the highest range, and the coarsest feeds use the low range. That's brilliant.

    English threads look fine except for 11.5, 13, and 27. I don't have change gears. Bummer since having a t/a and big bore is well suited for pipe work. I'll find or make the gears i need though if it comes to that. One is a phenolic gear, which i bet quiets the system a lot. It threads english down to an incredibly coarse 9/16th tpi. Metric threads seem to have a good range except 0.8. That's pretty small though. I can't envision cutting an m3 fastener on it. So yeah, feeds are much simpler now than they seemed before.
    used cars . Make it run like new use no new parts .

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    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    Wow, it cleans up nice! Didn't some other poster say that the ball screw does not turn, but the nut does? I have to confess I like it, I like it a lot. That's an impressive range on the gearbox. I bet you find some "interesting" designs inside that and the apron. Believe it or not, I even like the color because I spent the last couple decades looking at "machine grey". I think the green is easier on the eyes. Hope those belts don't cost too much $$$. But if all the other mechanicals check out or can be fixed, then I think it would be worth it.
    Yeah, it cleaned up a lot. My driveway is black.

    I think I may have said that, I was just confirming it. I'm kind of liking it too. The controls seemed weird to me at first, but now they seem quick, logical.

    Yeah green is alright.

    I'll keep the belts that aren't destroyed until I know for sure it's gonna be a good runner. Then I'll shotgun them all. It its what it is. The money is a drop in the bucket compared to the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1yesca View Post
    used cars . Make it run like new use no new parts .
    Yeah. Not my first rodeo. Try not to quote the whole post if you can avoid it, the threads get long.

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    Alright, well I'm done with college now (graduate in 3 days), so I'm gonna be starting in on this. My roommate has it packed in with bike shit and stuff, so I can't even move, so I won't be doing much til he moves out. Considering he has nowhere he is intending to go... that'll be fun. Ugh.

    But yeah, I was gonna take some pictures, but I didn't feel like fing with a manual lens, camera, and flash just to have PM nuke my photo quality anyway. So I made a long, rambly, shakey video. Watch it. Or don't. But it's the only video I can find on YT of a Daewoo A20.



    I also describe (most) of the problems I've found thus far. They are pretty extensive.

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    Is it that lathe supposed to have some kinda “way covers” on the front behind the apron?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Is it that lathe supposed to have some kinda “way covers” on the front behind the apron?

    Yeah. They're intact. I pulled the rod covers back to inspect and clean behind there.

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    Great video! That is the best way to look the machine over.
    Interesting machine, thanks for showing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    Great video! That is the best way to look the machine over.
    Interesting machine, thanks for showing it.
    Thanks Donie! I appreciate you stopping by. I know if it was yours it would look like a million bucks in short order!

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    If you need a new high speed flat belt you can get them from Al Bino belts in Penn. I had him make one for my Ikegai A20. Pretty good price. Yours is slightly longer due to the larger diameter spindle hole.

    Mine was pretty clean but I had some rusted through areas in the coolant tank I had to braze up. Amazing machine!

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    No rust on it is a plus!!!!
    I have seen those machines for sale from time to time, they were not cheap. The cylindrical slot shifters, and lead screw curtain are "George Jetson", or pretty cool, in my opinion!

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    Quote Originally Posted by markp View Post
    If you need a new high speed flat belt you can get them from Al Bino belts in Penn. I had him make one for my Ikegai A20. Pretty good price. Yours is slightly longer due to the larger diameter spindle hole.

    Mine was pretty clean but I had some rusted through areas in the coolant tank I had to braze up. Amazing machine!
    Awesome, thanks for the heads up. I haven't cracked the lid loose yet. Is it on the left or right end of the headstock? It turns over in high gear, so it's at least "intact". May be decent actually. I'll be asking you Ikegai owners some questions as I dig in.

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    No rust on it is a plus!!!!
    I have seen those machines for sale from time to time, they were not cheap. The cylindrical slot shifters, and lead screw curtain are "George Jetson", or pretty cool, in my opinion!
    There is some rust on my machine, dark, smooth rust. It is from years of being in an environment around molten salt baths. It actually makes a very smooth, resistant surface, sort of like cold blue. I won't go to any effort to remove it, just let it wear away.

    It is very modern for a 40 year old lathe. In fact, I haven't really seen a manual lathe that is built more modern. Maybe some of the late European machines.

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    I am trying wrap up my fixing up machine tools, and get back to making things, but I would probably fall for one of those because of the departure from the sometimes boring normal design.
    I will watch, if you want to show it, it looks like fun to me.

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    Normally I wouldn't comment, but I think that is a machine definitely worth saving. Unless you find something that is a huge deal breaker, it is worthy of a restoration. So many interesting features... I like it. I see the condition of the threading plaques, etc are very good, which usually is a indicator in how much use or abuse it has suffered, and the prognosis is good.


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